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By Davis Stevenson
From Flagstaff, Arizona
Apr 21, 2013
Following up a new route out in the Mojave Desert.  Info coming soon maybe?  Fun 5.10 hands and fingers.

Jason Kim wrote:
Once you factor in the cost of film and processing, I'm not so sure that using an old 35 mm body will save any money in the long run.


Once you drop a modern camera or lens and need to replace it, that's about 2,500 images worth of film and processing (if you do it yourself).

I had a high end Fuji P&S I used to use for backpacking and canyoneering (took great pics). I had it double-bagged in dry bags and somehow it got wet and destroyed (now I have a small Pelican case for carrying camera gear whenever there's a lot of water around.). $250+ to replace it. If water got into my Nikkormat, I know I could take the lens apart (on my fixed lenses, haven't tried a zoom yet) and clean it and get it going again, and could scrounge around on Ebay or KEH for a perfectly functioning body for $60-$80. Try that with a DSLR. That's the main reason I got back into film... but I fell back in love with it.

Anyways, if necessary, I could definitely take high quality pictures even with this setup:

photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/cell-phone-lenses/

They're actually pretty sweet, I use that macro lens and the inversion setting on my iPhone to inspect negs. My brother's Droid Razr HD even has exposure compensation and white balance settings on-board. I'm sure you could take magazine quality pictures with that rig, actually...

Anyways, sorry to go all luddite. Photography is an art. Use whatever tools are easy to use and give you what you envision.


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By nadeleets
Apr 21, 2013
Halloween 2011

These are NOT my best photos, but I though it would be interesting to show the crazy capabilities of the iPhone and free editing apps, and what you can do on the fly with a minimalist attitude. These are not R&I magazine-quality but their effectiveness in inspiring friends rely on timing, as I will usually post these photos immediately after a session.

1. Red Rock Canyon - Stratocaster Wall

Camera:  iPhone 5 <br />Editing:  Snapseed
Camera: iPhone 5
Editing: Snapseed


2. Flagstaff Mountain - Hobo Cave
Camera:  iPhone 5 <br />Editing:  Snapseed
Camera: iPhone 5
Editing: Snapseed


3. Shelf Road - Contest Wall
Camera:  iPhone 5 <br />Editing:  Snapseed
Camera: iPhone 5
Editing: Snapseed


4. Carter Lake - Big Kahuna Roof
Camera:  iPhone 5 <br />Editing:  Snapseed
Camera: iPhone 5
Editing: Snapseed


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By Jason Kim
From San Diego, CA
Apr 21, 2013
Descending Cox Col (Bear Creek Spire). Photo by Ryan Slaybaugh. <br />

Davis Stevenson wrote:
Once you drop a modern camera or lens and need to replace it, that's about 2,500 images worth of film and processing (if you do it yourself).


To be fair, the price of the glass would be the same in either case. I suppose we need to compare bodies and then batteries/memory vs. film/processing. I call it a wash!

Davis Stevenson wrote:
Photography is an art. Use whatever tools are easy to use and give you what you envision.


You hit the nail on the head!!


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By Jason Maki
Apr 22, 2013

How about some more point and shoot action? Here are a couple of my favorites.

Camera: Sony DSC-H55

Longs Peak - Notch Couloir
Longs Peak - Notch Couloir



Mount Valhalla - West Ridge
Mount Valhalla - West Ridge



Mount Adams, Sangre De Cristos
Mount Adams, Sangre De Cristos


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By Helldorado
From Boulder, CO
Apr 22, 2013






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By tenesmus
Apr 22, 2013

PHOTOASSAULT!!!





















/END PHOTOASSAULT...


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By Jonathan White
From littleton, co
Apr 22, 2013
Laps in Ouray

Shaking out the pump on Carlsberg Column.
Shaking out the pump on Carlsberg Column.

Doug leading the last pitch of Louise Falls
Doug leading the last pitch of Louise Falls

Doug leading the last pitch of Louise Falls
Doug leading the last pitch of Louise Falls


D70 + Nikkor 12-24mm f4 + RAW

My preference is for a super wide lens. You won't really push the limits of most sensors if you don't have good glass in front.


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By Davis Stevenson
From Flagstaff, Arizona
Apr 22, 2013
Following up a new route out in the Mojave Desert.  Info coming soon maybe?  Fun 5.10 hands and fingers.

Jason Kim wrote:
To be fair, the price of the glass would be the same in either case. I suppose we need to compare bodies and then batteries/memory vs. film/processing. I call it a wash! You hit the nail on the head!!


Not entirely sure about that, I just picked up a 50mm 1.4 (pre-AI... OLD/transitional bodies only without modification) for $80 and modified it myself. Same optics as the new stuff, for a few hundred less.

That's a tip for everyone, though, any of the higher-end prosumer bodies or pro bodies, it will meter and give aperture-priority with any Nikon glass. Check out KEH and eBay, as it takes about 10 minutes and a file to get any Nikon lens from before 1977 to fit a modern body with some auto functionality, and no modification for 85% of the lenses newer than that. It's a great way to get nice glass while you're just getting into it. With careful shopping my whole kit is up to only $350 (28mm, 50mm f/2, 50mm f/1.4, 100mm f/2.8, 135mm f/2.8, old 35mm-105 zoom). I usually cary the 28, 50, and 135, or the zoom and cheap 50 if I might break stuff.

I'm processing the last 2 years of stuff I have had this week... Maybe I'll make some scans to proof to show off here (even though I usually hate to). Don't know if I have too many climbing pictures mixed in there, but I do know I have a couple rolls of canyoneering stuff.

EDIT: Can't wait to get all my old negs out of storage, too. Probably a few hundred I haven't seen in years. I know I definitely have plenty of good stuff in there.


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By frxvced
Apr 25, 2013

Jason Kim wrote:
Questions that really, only you can answer, Dylan. No one knows the conditions you will be shooting in, how you will treat your gear, etc. Since it sounds like you have some fairly legit climbing goals in mind, I'd say that spending the extra money on a lightweight body, weather sealing, etc. will all come in handy, and might be justified if you've got a hookup with Nikon. In my experience, having spent many days in the backcountry in adverse conditions, there are only two things that will keep your camera gear in good operating condition: be as careful as you can and hope for some luck. Water, dust, etc. will eventually find their way into your gear, sealed or not. If it were me, and I was planning to invest in a new rig with the primary goal of making publish-worthy images during climbing trips, I'd buy a used version of a newer compact DSLR and a used zoom that covers something in the range of 22-100 mm (adjust for cropped sensor). Since the likelihood of damaging your gear beyond repair is very real, I wouldn't bother spending the money on new equipment, or an expensive body. Hopefully it will last you a season or two, and it won't be too painful to replace it after you smash your camera against a rock. Kinesis (www.kgear.com/store/) makes some nice accessories, including harness/strap systems that you might find useful. I use some of their stuff on extended backpacking trips when I'm carrying a ton of gear. I appreciate your desire to raise the stoke, and I will happily play along! Here's a shot of the moon and Jupiter over Mt. Hitchcock, as viewed from the west face of Mt. Whitney. Unfortunately, I don't really have any shots that involve bona fide climbing since it seems I'm always doing one or the other (it's damn hard to make nice photos while climbing). I do have some photos that climbers might appreciate, though. Canon 5D2, Canon 24-105L. Shot at very high ISO while bracing the tripod against my body to combat some fierce wind. Canon 5D2, Canon 17-40L. Sunrise from the summit of Haleakala, a standard tourist shot. Canon 5D2, Canon 17-40L. Lying in my tent at sunrise, and everything started to turn pink. I stuck my head outside the fly and saw this scene directly above. I have never moved so fast to get a shot set up. The light was gone less than a minute later.

Pretty good.
I also love the great outdoors. I like photography. But my parents wouldn't let me go to the adventure.


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Dec 6, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

Hi all, thought I'd bring this thread full circle with some shots through the new glass!

I listened hard to the advice provided here and went Nikon to take advantage of family lenses... Chose the D5200 for its glove-approved operation, in-camera features, 60fps HD shooting, and gimmicky fold-out screen that has proved to come in handy.

I've been climbing and playing with the camera in KY, WV, NC, TX, AR, and TN and it's served all my needs with aplomb

Picture is worth...

Austin night climb
Austin night climb


Summer-camper smearing.  <br /> <br />(Face blurred for privacy)
Summer-camper smearing.

(Face blurred for privacy)


Some bridge in West Virginia...
Some bridge in West Virginia...



Gorgeous in North Carolina's gorge
Gorgeous in North Carolina's gorge


Sendin' Seneca's Sevens
Sendin' Seneca's Sevens



Resting in the Red
Resting in the Red




Brrr in Big Bend
Brrr in Big Bend



My senior, smiling. (Enchanted Rock, TX)
My senior, smiling. (Enchanted Rock, TX)



I also had the good fortune of finding time to carry a POS point-and-shoot on a 1000 mile bike tour up the Atlantic coast proving that timing, lighting, luck, and composition still work without needing to schlepp pounds of kit...


Blue Ridge sunrise, point and shoot (from my sleeping bag!)
Blue Ridge sunrise, point and shoot (from my sleeping bag!)


Lincoln Memorial, Olympus point and assassinate, I mean shoot (too far? sorry...)
Lincoln Memorial, Olympus point and assassinate, I mean shoot (too far? sorry...)


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By Josh.H
From Albuquerque, NM
Dec 6, 2013
The cliche profile picture.

Dylan,

It all depends on what type of shooting you want to do,

My current setup is a Nikon D7000 with a Tamron 18-270mm lens.

My Photos

I enjoy the ability to get a range of shots without the need to switch lens in the field, but with that I am by no means an expert, a lot of photography (as it seems you are already aware) is dependent on the photographer themselves.

Don't get me wrong, I love all the options I have on my fancy Nikon, but I am nowhere near utilizing the full potential of that camera yet, I have seen superior photos taken on worse cameras, I have also taken some awesome shots.

Saying that, if you are going to make large prints (someone already addressed this point) then you'll want to watch the megapixels, and a DSLR is probably what you want. Depending on the shot you want, with a DSLR you will likely have to get into position, so if you have a zoom lens you could be on the ground or at the top of a pitch, if you have a wide angle you can get up on the face next to them.

If you're looking for getting some great shots to show to friends and family I would recommend one of those heavy duty, waterproof point and shoots.

What I've noticed make the biggest difference is white balance...its easy to overlook, and most cameras do a decent auto setting, but if you want to get those 'amazing shots' then take some time and learn how to do it well.

Also, I'd recommend a UV-0 filter for you lens so when you do accidently ream it into the face your $$ filter is scratched and not your $$$ lens.

Just my two cents.

EDIT: Also, from the initial photo from the cover of Rock and Ice magazine you posted it appears you really want to play with ISO, some smaller cameras have this feature, but watch the diameter of your lens and the aperture (f/stops), the higher the f/stop the less light allowed through the lens.

Again, I only state this because I wish someone had told me when I was starting out, but if you are well accustomed to this then someone else may find it useful.


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By elwood
Dec 6, 2013

old school
old school


moab---good old times
moab---good old times


eldo
eldo


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By Jonathan Dull
From NC High County
Dec 6, 2013
Edge of a Dream

Seneca Rocks, West Virginia
Seneca Rocks, West Virginia


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By Jonathan Dull
From NC High County
Dec 6, 2013
Edge of a Dream

El Cap Meadow
El Cap Meadow


Photo Credit: Paul David Martin of Boone, NC


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By Brassmonkey
Dec 6, 2013
Brass monkey

The Nose
The Nose


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By ScoRo
From Portland, OR
Dec 6, 2013
Ahhhh, remember the hair and pay tribute to it.

My brother Jimmy following a pitch on Serpentine Arete, Dragontail Peak, Enchantments, WA. Colchuck Glacier far below.
My brother Jimmy following a pitch on Serpentine Arete, Dragontail Peak, Enchantments, WA. Colchuck Glacier far below.


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By ScoRo
From Portland, OR
Dec 6, 2013
Ahhhh, remember the hair and pay tribute to it.

Hand Solo, Selfish Wall, Indian Creek <br />
Hand Solo, Selfish Wall, Indian Creek


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By Steve Jones
Dec 8, 2013
on belay

Storm approaching, Chamonix
Storm approaching, Chamonix


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By H..
From Washingtonville NY
Dec 8, 2013

teewinot summit <br />
teewinot summit


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By Clint Valentine
From Boston, MA
Dec 8, 2013
Gearing up for Pinnacle Gully (WI3), Huntington Ravine, Mount Washington, New Hampshire.

Photography is still a hobby for me but I love representing my travels in writing and images. I think it is an effective way to connect with other climbers that have shared similar experiences you are trying to elucidate through an image.

I carry the Panasonic GF1 Micro Four Thirds Camera and 20mm Pancake Kit lense. I love the portability and manual control over the camera, perfect for rock/ice/alpine in my opinion. It tends to get in the way every now and then makes me wish for a slim point and shoot waterproof camera. I swear by Mountainsmith's Soft cases for transporting the camera. I have yet to buy a Pelican case but imagine I will for a longer trip with more exposure.

Here's a sample image from the GF1 (there are much newer and much better versions of this camera now). I attach it to the binocular clips on my alpine pack with small carabiners for easy removal. It doesn't bounce around at all and is always slung around my neck to get a shot whenever I have a hand. I shoot in .raw and have great control over the finished product. Not a bad camera for some of the environments I have taken it in!

Kerlingarfjöll, Iceland
Kerlingarfjöll, Iceland


Gearing up for Pinnacle Gully (WI3), Huntington Ravine, Mount Washington, New Hampshire.
Gearing up for Pinnacle Gully (WI3), Huntington Ravine, Mount Washington, New Hampshire.


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By Dobson
From Butte, MT
Dec 8, 2013

Skyladder, Mount Andromeda

Skyladder
Skyladder


Descending the Lowe Route, Sphinx, Montana
Sphinx
Sphinx


Sunshine, Snowpatch Spire, Bugaboos
Snowpatch
Snowpatch


These were shot with one of two beat up old 20Ds. Lens is 17-40 F4L. Autofocus doesn't work on this lens anymore, but that's not really an issue with a lens this wide.

I almost lost the Skyladder image. I had bumped the dial climbing and ended up several stops overexposed. The Jpeg was solid white. Fortunately, I was able to pull enough data from the RAW file to put an image together.

When I bought my cameras, there wasn't a lighter alternative with satisfactory quality, durability, and handling. That said, I can't see myself buying another SLR. The mirrorless genre combines excellent optics and handling into a camera system less than half the weight of mine. Some are quite well built, too.

Edited to add:
I don't carry a camera case, nor do use any filters in front of my lens. I simply put the camera in my pack for transport and over my shoulder when there's a chance of getting the shot. My kit does take a lot of cosmetic damage (scratches, small dents), but nothing that affects the quality of my photography. The glass is still pristine despite my hatred of lens caps and filters because the hood takes all of the rock bashing. I consider a lens hood to be pretty much a requirement, it protects the lens AND improves image quality. A filter usually creates negative optical characteristics and at best does nothing for the photo.


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