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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 9, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

1) Post the THREE best climbing photographs you personally have ever taken. We're talking magazine-quality, ooo-and-ahhh worthy photos that spawn road trip plans and buy plane tickets...

Think Jim Thornburg: Stone Mountains or any R&I cover photo

Classy DWS shot
Classy DWS shot


2) What I really want to know: The KIT you used to capture each photo
-If DSLR, what model body with which specific lens?
-If point-and-shoot, what camera?
-Any anecdotes about rigging/ lighting you'd be willing to share? How did you get the shot?

3) Why I'm interested: I am graduating from college in a few weeks. My grandfather has offered to help me invest in a DSLR (he runs Nikon). I want to see what glass you all are looking through and what body is maximizing your results.

I am looking at the D3200 body specifically, but would love to hear other suggestions!

And to beat the clever but cliche internet-poster to the punch: I know the camera that comes out of the pack is the one that takes the best pictures. I'm looking to step it up a notch from point and shoot, and I understand this bulkier/ heavier format's challenges


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 9, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

1) Approaching Zion's east side classic, Led By Sheep

dramatic approach
dramatic approach


Kit: Olympus TG-610 tough series point and shoot
Shooting considerations: Positioning (ran ahead of partner), lighting (clouds did their thing)
What I would do differently: subject engagement: LOOK AT ME! (He's a bit stubborn)

And if you are concerned about "publishing" your images online, put a giant, nasty watermark on them or use a poor resolution like I did

Thanks for any advice!


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 9, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

2) Sending the gap from the tower to the buttress at Maverick Buttress camping

Exposed?
Exposed?


Kit: Olympus TG-610 tough series point and shoot
Shooting considerations: Timing was everything here. Also, my position relative to the jump. Loved getting Moab's "Behind The Rocks" area in the background
What I would do differently: Subject visibility. If I were a bit higher he would have popped against the talus field more visibly than against the wingate wall


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 9, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

3) Pulling pockets and wobbling cobbles above Telluride in fall

Hard to shoot poorly here...
Hard to shoot poorly here...


Kit: Olympus TG-610 tough series point and shoot
Shooting considerations:
-Getting elevated on an adjacent route to adjust background (self belay on TR)
-Timing of climber in the crux sequence
-Fully overcast day resulted in perfect lighting despite wall's north-facing aspect

What I would do differently: again, subject engagement. Climber ideally would face the lens (and not be on TR)


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 9, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

John Marsella wrote:
There's a whole forum dedicated to this:


Thanks for the link. I thought it would get more visibility in "General". (Also I didn't notice that category).

Despite the existing content I would still like to see more info about what setups people are using.

Again, specifically body info and lens suggestions as well as user's .02 on the Nikon/ Canon marriage decision I'll have to commit to


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By Jason Kim
From San Diego, CA
Apr 9, 2013
Descending Cox Col (Bear Creek Spire). Photo by Ryan Slaybaugh. <br />

If your grandfather runs Nikon, you should be able to do better than a Nikon D3200. I kid, I kid.

Keep in mind that it is difficult, if not impossible to assess lens quality by looking at a relatively tiny web-size image. If your ultimate goal is to make big prints, the glass matters a lot more than if your images are primarily destined for web output. Having a clear understanding of your goals is important when deciding what sort of camera system to invest in.

A DSLR like the 3200, coupled with a decent zoom should work great. I use a full frame DSLR for portrait and landscape work, but I find myself climbing with an old Canon Rebel (1st Gen) and a lightweight, inexpensive zoom (or a point and shoot) most of the time. Unless I'm specifically out to target a certain photo, it is usually too much hassle to deal with all the weight and bulk of a "pro" setup (and the very real risk of breaking your expensive gear). That is, unless you're out there as a photographer first, and a climber second. It's all about priorities.

Nearly any modern compact DSLR and lens kit is capable of making publish-quality images. The technology is so good, it's now more true than ever that it's about the person standing (or hanging) behind the camera.


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By Jason Kim
From San Diego, CA
Apr 9, 2013
Descending Cox Col (Bear Creek Spire). Photo by Ryan Slaybaugh. <br />

Dylan Weldin wrote:
Again, specifically body info and lens suggestions as well as user's .02 on the Nikon/ Canon marriage decision I'll have to commit to


Don't get caught up in brand hype. That's like asking whether you will climb harder using Petzl vs. BD draws. If your grandfather runs Nikon, I would expect the decision to be a no-brainer, no?


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Apr 9, 2013
...

I don't know about, "Best". But these are my FAVORITES.



Woody Stark
Woody Stark




Woody Stark
Woody Stark





Woody Stark
Woody Stark






Equipment used was the CHEAPEST piece of shit I could buy from Wal Mart. (Paid approx. $75.00, CANON, "point and shoot". JUNK!)


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By kennoyce
From Layton, UT
Apr 9, 2013
Climbing at the Gallery in Red Rocks

Jason Kim wrote:
Don't get caught up in brand hype. That's like asking whether you will climb harder using Petzl vs. BD draws. If your grandfather runs Nikon, I would expect the decision to be a no-brainer, no?


Seriously, I shoot Nikon, but you'd better believe that if I had someone close to me that shot Canon, i'd shoot Canon just to be able to share lenses. Also, as has been mentioned, unless you are making really, really big prints, pretty much any current Nikon or Canon lens will do just fine for climbing shots. For the most part, you're going to want a decent depth of field, so having a fast lens isn't too important (plus they're heavy for taking out climbing), and the crappiest lens made by either company will easily produce a magazine quality print.

Unfortunately, when I'm climbing, I'm climbing, and when I'm photographing, I'm photographing, so I don't have many great climbing shots to contribute to this thread.


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By GhaMby
From Heaven
Apr 9, 2013
Are you Chicken, or fishy?

bishop
bishop


Richard
Richard


Will
Will


Rooster
Rooster


Taken with an Olympus TG-2


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By Ben Brotelho
From Albany, NY
Apr 9, 2013
Epic free solo with a pack on

Walking towards Boott Spur
Walking towards Boott Spur




Some guide belaying at the top of the steep ice on Cascade waterfall, Cascade Pass, ADK
Some guide belaying at the top of the steep ice on Cascade waterfall, Cascade Pass, ADK


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By Jon C. Sullivan
From Fort Collins, CO
Apr 9, 2013
approach to the Grand

One of them is good, I just cant ever decide. Indian Creek. Some 10d dihedral. My attempt to bring the lycra back!

One of the best climbs of the trip! notice the black diamond advertisement?
One of the best climbs of the trip! notice the black diamond advertisement?


and another photo from different slope
and another photo from different slope


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By Ben Brotelho
From Albany, NY
Apr 9, 2013
Epic free solo with a pack on

Jon: is that a BD beer cozy??


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By Jon C. Sullivan
From Fort Collins, CO
Apr 9, 2013
approach to the Grand

Yes sir it is. Also, one more photo. best campsite I have ever had in ten years of regular car and backcountry camping. views of the creek as you can see, were ridiculous and the Bridger Jacks were no more than a few hundred yards behind the camera that took this photo.

Rest day! I need to get better at slack lining.
Rest day! I need to get better at slack lining.


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By Jon C. Sullivan
From Fort Collins, CO
Apr 9, 2013
approach to the Grand

whoops, forgot the camera details. I believe most of these were shot with my new Cannon Rebel T3i but my girlfriend is the photographer ( B.A. in fine arts and photography) so Im sure some of the details were intentional. The camera's glass is the one that comes with the T3i out of the box. Great camera for under 500.00 for sure.


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By Jon H
From Boulder
Apr 9, 2013
At the matching crux

Dylan, you're going about this all wrong. If you just want to see some pretty pictures, then fine, you're on the right track, but it's a fools errand to try and pick the best camera based on the images you see in this thread. They won't tell you anything at all.

It's simple: Buy whatever is on sale. Nobody makes a bad camera any more. They are all equally capable, the resolution wars are over, and lens prices have (more or less) achieved parity.

It doesn't make your choice any easier per se, but that's the way it is. I made my living with Canon cameras for years. I'm in an entirely different industry now, but I would have no hesitation buying Nikon or Sony today (but would lean towards Canon or Nikon for reasons of ubiquity alone).


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By LIV
Apr 9, 2013
Kirk Couloir Challenger Peak

Upper Mother
Upper Mother


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By Adam Stackhouse
Administrator
Apr 9, 2013
Courtright Reservoir, September 2013

Jon H wrote:
Dylan, you're going about this all wrong. If you just want to see some pretty pictures, then fine, you're on the right track, but it's a fools errand to try and pick the best camera based on the images you see in this thread. They won't tell you anything at all. It's simple: Buy whatever is on sale. Nobody makes a bad camera any more. They are all equally capable, the resolution wars are over, and lens prices have (more or less) achieved parity. It doesn't make your choice any easier per se, but that's the way it is. I made my living with Canon cameras for years. I'm in an entirely different industry now, but I would have no hesitation buying Nikon or Sony today (but would lean towards Canon or Nikon for reasons of ubiquity alone).

In a nutshell, there you go!


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By Joe Virtanen
From Asheville, NC
Apr 9, 2013
Pit BBQ

Here's a couple of recent shots.

Drew Hayes on Pit Barbecue (V6)
Drew Hayes on Pit Barbecue (V6)


Camera - Canon T3i, with Canon 430 EXII flash
Considerations - relative darkness of the pit from which the problem starts


David Barbour on Too Many Puppies (5.12a)
David Barbour on Too Many Puppies (5.12a)


Camera - same, no flash
Considerations - Sun was at just the wrong spot, I had to frame the shot like this so that I didn't get the shadow of my rope or my own shadow in the shot.


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By Ryan Nevius
From The Range of Light
Apr 9, 2013
Mt. Agassiz

Locker wrote:
I don't know about, "Best". But these are my FAVORITES. Equipment used was the CHEAPEST piece of shit I could buy from Wal Mart. (Paid approx. $75.00, CANON, "point and shoot". JUNK!)


Is that the Tall Wall in the AH, Locker? I feel like I've been on that climb. Nice shot!


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By drmartindell
From Homer, Ak
Apr 9, 2013

Dylan Weldin wrote:
1) What I would do differently: subject engagement: LOOK AT ME! (He's a bit stubborn)


Whaaa? James....stubborn?
I'd go with relentless.


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 9, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

drmartindell wrote:
Whaaa? James....stubborn? I'd go with relentless.


Here's a "relentless" James shot for ya!

"In Alaska..."
"In Alaska..."


The climber pictured in the Led by Sheep pic is Ian from OK. Glad you recognized your fellow Homer-ite though!


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 9, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

Jon H wrote:
Dylan, you're going about this all wrong. If you just want to see some pretty pictures, then fine, you're on the right track, but it's a fools errand to try and pick the best camera based on the images you see in this thread. They won't tell you anything at all. It's simple: Buy whatever is on sale. Nobody makes a bad camera any more. They are all equally capable, the resolution wars are over, and lens prices have (more or less) achieved parity. It doesn't make your choice any easier per se, but that's the way it is. I made my living with Canon cameras for years. I'm in an entirely different industry now, but I would have no hesitation buying Nikon or Sony today (but would lean towards Canon or Nikon for reasons of ubiquity alone).


Thanks for the commentary... and for calling me a fool :)

To clarify, I am NOT looking to purchase a DSLR based on what one amateur enthusiast did one time with a good bit of luck and even more patience... That WOULD make me a fool.

I wanted to give people the opportunity to share some of their favorite shots and, along with them, provide info about their setup/ why they bought it/ if they're happy with it/ etc. I want to hear what members of our community are really out there shooting with, and why not give them a forum to show off a bit and raise some stoke?

It really isn't as simple as buying what is on sale... What about weather sealing? Auto focusing throughout video modes? Operability of controls while wearing gloves? Performance at temperature extremes? Weight considerations? (Ex: D3200 is close to 50% lighter than similar magnesium-alloy bodied cameras, but is possibly not as durable?/ Waterproof?!??!)

I guess I'm looking for specifics, so I'll aks a specific question; specifically:
When comparing the Nikon D3200 to the D7100 there is a key difference a climber should take note of: durability of the body material/ weather sealing. Does anyone have any experience with a sealed/ vs. unsealed bodies? Blowing Utah dust? Ice dripping in the park? Afternoon surprise storms in the rockies?
Would you recommend weather sealing/ am I going to destroy the cheaper D3200 faster because it is not sealed?

I've effectively answered my own question here, but I'm open to any/ all input...


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By Dylan Weldin
From Austin, Texas
Apr 10, 2013
Summit of my first tower, the Rectory via Fine Jade

Locker, that B&W is fantastic!!! Nice contrast!

Is that Josh? Or the City?


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By Jason Kim
From San Diego, CA
Apr 10, 2013
Descending Cox Col (Bear Creek Spire). Photo by Ryan Slaybaugh. <br />

Questions that really, only you can answer, Dylan. No one knows the conditions you will be shooting in, how you will treat your gear, etc. Since it sounds like you have some fairly legit climbing goals in mind, I'd say that spending the extra money on a lightweight body, weather sealing, etc. will all come in handy, and might be justified if you've got a hookup with Nikon.

In my experience, having spent many days in the backcountry in adverse conditions, there are only two things that will keep your camera gear in good operating condition: be as careful as you can and hope for some luck. Water, dust, etc. will eventually find their way into your gear, sealed or not.

If it were me, and I was planning to invest in a new rig with the primary goal of making publish-worthy images during climbing trips, I'd buy a used version of a newer compact DSLR and a used zoom that covers something in the range of 22-100 mm (adjust for cropped sensor). Since the likelihood of damaging your gear beyond repair is very real, I wouldn't bother spending the money on new equipment, or an expensive body. Hopefully it will last you a season or two, and it won't be too painful to replace it after you smash your camera against a rock.

Kinesis (www.kgear.com/store/) makes some nice accessories, including harness/strap systems that you might find useful. I use some of their stuff on extended backpacking trips when I'm carrying a ton of gear.

I appreciate your desire to raise the stoke, and I will happily play along! Here's a shot of the moon and Jupiter over Mt. Hitchcock, as viewed from the west face of Mt. Whitney. Unfortunately, I don't really have any shots that involve bona fide climbing since it seems I'm always doing one or the other (it's damn hard to make nice photos while climbing). I do have some photos that climbers might appreciate, though.

Moon over Hitchcock
Moon over Hitchcock

Canon 5D2, Canon 24-105L. Shot at very high ISO while bracing the tripod against my body to combat some fierce wind.


Sunrise on Haleakala
Sunrise on Haleakala

Canon 5D2, Canon 17-40L. Sunrise from the summit of Haleakala, a standard tourist shot.


West Temple, Zion Nat'l Park
West Temple, Zion Nat'l Park

Canon 5D2, Canon 17-40L. Lying in my tent at sunrise, and everything started to turn pink. I stuck my head outside the fly and saw this scene directly above. I have never moved so fast to get a shot set up. The light was gone less than a minute later.


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By JacobD
From Flagstaff, AZ
Apr 10, 2013
Me on Half Dome Boulder, Middle Finger of Fury <br /> <br />Awesome problem!






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