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What is the carbon footprint of rock climbing????
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Mar 5, 2010
Does anyone know of the carbon footprint of gear in climbing??

Theree is organicclimber.com that is trying the grean route and the mags are recyled material.

What is the footprint of a cam???
Rocking Rick
From Silver City
Joined Sep 25, 2009
5 points
Mar 5, 2010
I know Aluminum takes a lot of energy to produce. You can be pretty certain that the more kick-ass the material, the more heinous it is to the environment: Carbon fiber, spectra, dyneema...I have no clue what the carbon footprint is, but they all require nasty chemicals to produce. Composite layup is a very wasteful process with a large amount of material ending up in the trash. Mike Anderson
From Colorado Springs, CO
Joined Nov 15, 2004
3,199 points
Mar 5, 2010
Bouldering at right side of Sun Deck
Carpool to the crag! YDPL8S
From Santa Monica, Ca.
Joined Aug 7, 2003
933 points
Mar 5, 2010
This is a novel auto blocking belay device.  I thi...
Mike Anderson wrote:
I know Aluminum takes a lot of energy to produce. You can be pretty certain that the more kick-ass the material, the more heinous it is to the environment: Carbon fiber, spectra, dyneema...I have no clue what the carbon footprint is, but they all require nasty chemicals to produce. Composite layup is a very wasteful process with a large amount of material ending up in the trash.


Egads!!!!

I recommend, to alleviate your conscience, you stop climbing. I'll buy your best gear at a heavy discount, then you won't have to worry about me going and buying it myself, thus perpetuating your carbon footprint. I live in Denver so please deliver it by bicycle.
Rick Blair
From Denver
Joined Oct 16, 2007
286 points
Mar 5, 2010
Contact a few gear companies and ask if they have produced a corporate social responsibility report. If no, ask if they've done any environmental analysis on their production operations. If no, tel them you would very much like to see that kind of thing published.

Then do some research into the environmental impact of shipping. There should be some rules of thumb that give a rough impact-per-mile in units of carbon equivalent.

Next, consider the end of cycle use of the gear in question. Can it be recycled? Is it recycled? What are the impacts of that process?

Once your done with all that, remember that the non-GHG impacts are also potentially significant. What about particulate emissions? Economic considerations (e.g. job creation, living wage, etc)? Social considerations (e.g. employee quality-of-life issues at manufacturers, etc)?

I guess what I'm saying is that it's real complicated and if would be flipping awesome if you're seriously trying to look into it. If you just want someone to give you an answer, ask an easier question. Like, are Master Cams better than Aliens.
Lanky
From Tired
Joined Jun 20, 2008
407 points
Mar 5, 2010
ice park
I'd say it's low enough that for Climbing Magazine to put out a "Green Issue" they had to focus on running it out above trad gear rather than clipping bolts. What do you think the carbon footprint would be of ending up in the ER being held together by pins and plates? Will Butler
From Boulder, CO
Joined Sep 6, 2005
53 points
Mar 5, 2010
n cascades
I don't have a dog so my offset there allows me to climb guilt free. If you have a dog, and you climb? You might as well go burn down the amazon. Jesse Davidson
From san diego, ca
Joined May 30, 2007
71 points
Mar 5, 2010
Me in the 70's
Climbers have a big carbon footprint. With all of the driving to climbing areas, the gym and weekend road trips, most climbers use more gas than a typical non-climbing family carpooling their kids to school in an SUV.

I'd say climbers are big supporters of Exxon, Chevron and Saudi Aramco. Most companies that produce the raw materials for climbing gear such as Alcan Aluminum, Dupot & 3M etc. are all big polluters.

The impact on the crags is significant too...I could go on and on.
bsmoot
Joined Aug 21, 2006
1,882 points
Mar 5, 2010
What a waste of time this discussion is. JML
Joined May 3, 2009
37 points
Mar 5, 2010
Stabby
The climbing related carbon footprint generated by every American climber is probably less than 10 seconds of China's annual output.
How anal can you get?

And John, you do know what the worst part of driving a scooter is, don't you?
Mike Lane
From Centennial, CO
Joined Jan 21, 2006
839 points
Mar 5, 2010
Jim at the Boneyard TRing a route
...and just think how much beer (we) climbers drink...hardly a carbon-neutral process!! Jim Matt
From Indianapolis, IN
Joined Sep 4, 2003
302 points
Mar 5, 2010
Mens Crisis Center .12a
Mike Lane wrote:
The climbing related carbon footprint generated by every American climber is probably less than 10 seconds of China's annual output. How anal can you get? And John, you do know what the worst part of driving a scooter is, don't you?


Is it the same as the hardest part about rollerblading?
Ian G.
From PDX, OR
Joined Apr 13, 2009
346 points
Mar 5, 2010
bsmoot wrote:
Climbers have a big carbon footprint. With all of the driving to climbing areas, the gym and weekend road trips, most climbers use more gas than a typical non-climbing family carpooling their kids to school in an SUV. I'd say climbers are big supporters of Exxon, Chevron and Saudi Aramco. Most companies that produce the raw materials for climbing gear such as Alcan Aluminum, Dupot & 3M etc. are all big polluters. The impact on the crags is significant too...I could go on and on.



Totally bsmoot! Man, you nailed it. Climbers are jacking this planet of ours, and to be frank, it's unconscionable. I'm sooo damn sick of this "me first" climber attitude. Do you all not know what you're doing to the Manatee or the Prebles or, fer chris' sake, the POLAR BEARS!
And how about your support of corporate America and the capitalist pigs of the world who own Exxon and Chevron!
Eeewwww!!
Now, this is just one weak mans opinion: stop climbing! Take all of your climbing gear and give it to me. . . I have no conscience. That's right, you can clear up your Karma and do your part (damnit!) in saving this planet of ours.

If you'd hate to see your evil planet-killin' gear go to a self-absorbd asshat, then you could also make a house out of it! Thaz'right! make a rad eco-home out of climbing gear. Mix in some hay bales and adobe; add some old tires and coke bottles and beer cans (only the rigid pulltab cans); toss in some horse manure, dog shit and fine-aggregate. . . well, you get the point.
You'd be the Green King of the World! Great minds, like Al Gore, will visit - and when Obama shows up, there'll be sing-alongs and beer drinkin until the local Conservatives, led by Palin, just go freakin' nutz and light up the place with their sociopathic firearms. And then you'll show 'em! You'll show'em good! "Cause, like, see, I told you the Conservatives were intolerant lead-slingin' redneck psychopathic war-mongers who hate the planet! You see! I was right!"

Ah, but I digress. Well said bsmoot. . . totally. :) <that thing to the left is a "smiley face". It's meaning is, "all in good fun". Or, it could mean that I am a pretentious(JML) sarcastic(Jim Matt) prick (me) who's really mean and hateful. But it doesn't, it means the former. ;)

Cheers, cheerio, caio, & adios!
Umph!
Joined Nov 8, 2004
277 points
Mar 5, 2010
Stabby
Ian G. wrote:
Is it the same as the hardest part about rollerblading?

Bingo.
Mike Lane
From Centennial, CO
Joined Jan 21, 2006
839 points
Mar 6, 2010
Yvon Chouinard had it rigth when he said "we're all polluters."

I'd say our biggest impact is driving cars to the crag.

Another thing to consider in your purchases is that anadizaton(sp?) of aluminum uses some pretty gnarly chemicals. I wish cam companies stopped treating the lobes and just color coded the plastic....Also something to consider when you buy carabiners.

Evan
Evan1984
Joined Aug 15, 2007
77 points
Mar 6, 2010
Stabby
I have the perfect solution:

Biodegradeable Protection!

I'll start whipping up some in my garage this afternoon. Now we'll have something to answer every nancyboy who is fretting over this.

John- you know I was just teasing. I think living in a place where everyone gets around on 2 wheels would be great.
Mike Lane
From Centennial, CO
Joined Jan 21, 2006
839 points
Mar 6, 2010
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Pea...
What do you think the carbon footprint is of generating reports and analysis to give to marketing firms who then design print ads and other collateral materials that tell end consumers how small their products' carbon footprints are?

If I lived in Bermuda I'd bike it, too. I might even get a three-wheeler with a big ice cream cooler on the front.
Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
Joined Jan 1, 2001
1,496 points
Mar 6, 2010
Me on the summit of Devil's Tower
Dung Beetle
Dung Beetle
Eastvillage
From New York, NY
Joined Mar 19, 2006
93 points
Mar 6, 2010
Mexico roadside rocks
For the
aluminum can, considering 50 % recycling rate, the Carbon Footprint has been calculated as 8,96 kg
CO2e per kg. It seems that the Carbon Footprint of the glass bottle is lower than the Carbon Footprint of
the aluminum can.

Climbing Gear = Aluminum
CO_Michael
Joined May 31, 2008
1,022 points
Mar 6, 2010
Mike Lane wrote:
And John, you do know what the worst part of driving a scooter is, don't you?


...having your parent's find out you died in a scooter accident.
Yep
Joined Dec 19, 2005
0 points
Mar 6, 2010
me
Find something else to worry about Kenny Thompson
From Cottage grove oregon
Joined Feb 4, 2010
605 points
Mar 7, 2010
Rock Wars, RRG, 2008
naked free climb bouldering; carry out your poop. Woodchuck ATC
Joined Nov 29, 2007
3,091 points
Mar 9, 2010
Silverton
I believe that we should all do the best we can in any area. But, I don't think I know a climber that would for-go the pleasures of climbing for the environment. We (as climbers) tend to bring heavy foot-traffic and not head warnings(Mushroom Boulder). If these things evade us then I am sure we are doing the same to the environment.

Now as for a world effort to control Global Warming.The simple fact remains that coal power plants still put mercury in the water. We lost that battle already.It is the cheapest form of power, most countries don't have enough $$ to go clean.

Humans won't stop, doubling time isn't a theory. There is only so much habitable land, and resources. We aren't going to kill mother nature. She may however, kill us.

"I'm sick of this art, humanity, bull$#!^.... we're a virus with shoes." -- Bill Hicks.
Power Plant In Mexico
Power Plant In Mexico
Ty Harlacker
From Albuquerque, NM
Joined Mar 2, 2008
211 points
Mar 10, 2010
Discussing the environment at a belay one time, my buddy said, "You had 3 kids, and I had none. You'll spend your entire life recycling, car-pooling and trying to be low-impact. I won't do a thing and I'll be way ahead of you."

Apparently, I am the problem, but I'm good with with that.
rob bauer
From Golden, CO
Joined Dec 2, 2004
1,696 points
May 14, 2010
Mexico roadside rocks
I think I found it. In part.

climatechangewales.org.uk/obje...

Carbon Footprint
Kgs of CO2 produced per kg of metal
Aluminium from bauxite 12
Aluminium recycled 1.7
CO_Michael
Joined May 31, 2008
1,022 points
May 14, 2010
Me on a mixed route Crisco and I did in Rock Canyo...
My carbon footprint is huge. Tristan Higbee
From Cambodia
Joined Mar 9, 2008
3,128 points


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