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By Chimi
Jan 11, 2014
MJMobes wrote:
Chimi- Coming from someone who deals with permits and inspection on a regular basis I have to say DO NOT LET THEM PUSH YOU AROUND!!! Sometimes you just have to tell them to talk to your lawyer even if you dont have one. Unless you live in a podunk town where the building officials need something to pass their time they will go away. Hearing you talk about having to calculate wind load for the permit is one of the funniest things I have heard in a while. I get they dont want sheets of plywood flying around the neighborhood during storms but at the same time you dont want panels coming off on you while you climb. Many a time I have been harassed for doing work to my own home when I knew I did not need a permit. They sometimes overstep their authority and in your case I'm sure they have. Not once have I been fined or had a stop work order issued. Its still worth it to be civil when dealing with them, even if you have to "lawyer up", offer them a cup of coffee and a donut if they come by again, coffee and donuts make govt workers very happy.


Hey, thanks for the feedback.

Worst case, I'll just shorten it and turn it into a 'tool shed' -- and maybe go for a completely enclosed type of design compared to how it stands right now.

In my communication with them, I am civil and polite; I am merely probing them with more questions as to why they are saying things are a certain way without backing other than "It's just what we decided." Arbitrary decisions do not belong in building permit and building code enforcement. I think people have a natural tendency to disagree with or even fear things they are unfamiliar with. It's not everyday someone builds a climbing wall -- maybe a tool shed or playground, sure.

The best part about those calculations is that I can run them easily myself. I am currently a practicing engineer -- granted not in civil structures -- but static force analysis on trusses, beams, etc with loading is pretty trivial. Let's say it collapses and I hurt myself, so what? It should be my problem for not being careful, but eh, it is what it is.

I think this case differs from your home projects. I certainly see a climbing wall as a part of a play structure, and apparently, so do many playground manufacturers as evidenced by commercially available playground sets or outdoor parks having rock climbing walls in their designs. It seems to me that they're just unwilling to yield and call it a play structure because somebody lodged a complaint.

Anyway, I'll keep this thread updated with whatever happens -- maybe I'll have to teardown and rebuild as a 'tool shed', or maybe I'll get to keep it.

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By MJMobes
From The land of steady habits
Jan 11, 2014
modern man
Honestly its none of their business to start with, thats why you tell them to scram if they hound you too much.

A lot of places do want a permit for any shed with over a 100sq ft footprint. I'd tell them its a sculpture next time.

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By csass
Jan 14, 2014
Hey all! I started out with figuring out the room I had to work with so I can still park 2 cars in my garage. I screwed straight into the studs in the garage wall for the headers and footers, added the framing and bracing, and made the final cuts!The wall ended up being 10'x8.5'. Ill put up finished photos this weekend.

With the Header and 2 Footers
With the Header and 2 Footers


With the Framing
With the Framing


Bracing added to the framing
Bracing added to the framing


Plywood up to snap chalk lines and figure out final cuts
Plywood up to snap chalk lines and figure out final cuts

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By Legion
Jan 14, 2014
Chimi wrote:
This is not legal advice in anyway, but it seems like you have two options depending on where you live. 1. Build it and hope nobody complains. 2. Try and get it permitted beforehand (and hope they don't try to screw you with permit prices).


You should start a new thread keeping us updated about your permitting journey. I think it would be helpful and I suspect lots of related topics would come out. Good luck.

I opted for #1 and have been lucky for a couple years despite being in a major big SoCal city. I think neighbor complaints is the biggest risk but mine have turned a blind eye. I also intentionally tried to blend it in with my house by making it into a cave and keep it from becoming an eyesore.

One thing I would do differently is set it back further from the property line. Right now there's only a foot so it would be non-compliant regardless what it's classified as. General idea is to adhere to code wherever possible and stay friendly with neighbors. Even then, my worry would be when ownership of neighboring homes change hands.

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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Jan 14, 2014
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after a day of cragging.
Nice wall csass. One thing though- you should pop some lines where your studs are, and then take your panels back off to mark and drill holes and then install Tnuts. It's a hell of a lot easier to work with when it's on a table or a pair of sawhorses. I wish I had your garage.

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By Joe M.
Jan 14, 2014
Right side of garage
Right side of garage


Left side of garage
Left side of garage

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By Woodchuck ATC
Jan 14, 2014
Rock Wars, RRG, 2008
Chimi wrote:
Guys and Gals, Just wanted to remind you to get your permitting stuff done if applicable to where you live. I built my wall without requesting a permit AFTER having read the rules for permit exempt structures and designing it within the allowable constraints of a playground/playset, shed, etc. type of structure and deciding that it was okay to do. The county, at least for now, refuses to classify it as a playset. I have no clue what else it would be classified as it certainly seems in spirit very similar to a playset. Some playsets even have climbing walls on them! Just a few words of caution!


My outdoor structure is classified as an 'out building', a storage shed that could not be more than certain square footage or height. I kept to those restrictions, but have non permanent pop-up sections on roof to add 8 to 12 ft. of climbing height over the years. Of course my 'shed' is 4 sided, some sides far from vertical, and with the growth of my back yard trees has become pretty well hidden. Snooping village inspectors are always coming around homes, driving up and down street LOOKING for violations to spin up money here. Everybody hates them and run when they see their truck coming down the street, or close up garage door to hide construction projects. So far, after almost19 years since I built it, they have not bothered me. (Police here very supportive,most think I'm working for CIA or something secret,,,)
Love some of the newer walls shown here,, some great looking outdoor pary scenes certainly a possibility.

FLAG
By csass
Jan 14, 2014
Jake Jones wrote:
Nice wall csass. One thing though- you should pop some lines where your studs are, and then take your panels back off to mark and drill holes and then install Tnuts. It's a hell of a lot easier to work with when it's on a table or a pair of sawhorses. I wish I had your garage.


Thanks Jake! We tacked the plywood up so we could get our marks for the T nuts. We used a chalk snap line once they were up to make an 8" matrix. The walls are down now, pre-drilled, and ready for T nut installation today. Thanks for the advice! Will post a finished product picture this weekend.

FLAG
 
By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Jan 14, 2014
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after a day of cragging.
csass wrote:
Thanks Jake! We tacked the plywood up so we could get our marks for the T nuts. We used a chalk snap line once they were up to make an 8" matrix. The walls are down now, pre-drilled, and ready for T nut installation today. Thanks for the advice! Will post a finished product picture this weekend.


I figured, but I couldn't tell by the pic whether it was screwed in or just tacked in place- so I thought I'd offer. Good job on the wall!

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By y2kdeuce
Jan 14, 2014
Hey Folks,

Planning to build my first wall. I have a corner in a second floor addition to work with. Should I build over the drywall or remove it to work with the bare studs? This is a picture before the insulation and drywall was added.

wall before drywall
wall before drywall

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By MJMobes
From The land of steady habits
Jan 14, 2014
modern man
y2kdeuce wrote:
Hey Folks, Planning to build my first wall. I have a corner in a second floor addition to work with. Should I build over the drywall or remove it to work with the bare studs? This is a picture before the insulation and drywall was added.


any inspector wants a fire wall, just wait and go over

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By Tony Monbetsu
Jan 14, 2014
Tateita Face at Ayoro Beach
Greetings from Japan. I've been living and teaching English here for over three years now, and I've got something to sort-of climb on-

Woodie version 2
Woodie version 2


The next step is getting a full-size piece of plywood to put in there and actually have something more than a glorified hangboard. That's coming tomorrow. The angle is adjustable by lengthening the cords holding it upright.

I do have plans for a garage cave after this done, but I'm dealing with 8 foot ceilings.

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By jonathan.lipkin
From Brooklyn, NY
Jan 15, 2014
MJMobes wrote:
any inspector wants a fire wall, just wait and go over

MJM is right. Also, if you ever take down the wall, you'll have done the construction already. If I were you, I'd put up sheetrock first. Make sure you use the correct type of insulation so that you don't have moisture issues.

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By WilInBris
Jan 17, 2014
I currently have a little wall under my veranda. With some home renos we are doing the current veranda will move up the back yard and I will have the thing to use. It will remain open. Below is a design I have been toying with on sketchup


first design
first design


Yellow = vert wall
Red = 2.4m wide with 1.2m vert, 1.2m @ 90 deg, 0.6m @ 45 deg, ~0.8 @ 30 deg
Green = 2.4m wide, 40 deg with 0.6m kicker
Blue = 20 deg with 0.6m kicker.

What do you see as the positives and negatives?

What changes would you make?

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By TBlom
Jan 18, 2014
^^^

Maybe add horizontal panels on the ceiling to tie all the walls together. The blue 20 degree wall will probably not get used much. Might as well make the middle wall wider and close to 45 degrees.

in my experience the less steep walls are just not as fun, and end up not seeing much traffic.

(nice sketchup pic too...)


I'm building a wall for a friend of mine in a single car garage. Similar construction to csass's wall, but we built a footer wall to carry the load of the wall to the concrete (doubled the existing wall over the drywall up to a header at 3.5', the header carries all the framing and hangers), and doubled all ceiling joists and studs that we attached to. We used joist hangers in case of code issues, although in the past I have not needed them. Deck screw construction at key points makes the wall stronger, framing nails where screws are overkill. Horizontal sections will get doubled (sistered) joists where the edges of boards will mount (to keep the structure ridgid, and to keep the house from shaking).
garagesketchup
garagesketchup

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By climbnplay
Jan 18, 2014
woody
woody


Standard 1-5-9 (22cm spacing, 15 degree lean), with additional in-between rungs. Secured to the loft.

FLAG
 
By rogerk
Jan 20, 2014
WilInBris wrote:
What do you see as the positives and negatives? What changes would you make?


Not unlike my home wall. I would move the red section into the middle. That will make for some interesting transitions between sections. You will love the red sections multiple angles as it will really work core strength. However, on the red, the high kickplate section with horizontal roof bit will allow you to get into some rest positions that you don't want. To deal with this, I made it closer to a typical kickplate height(~16") and a 60 degree(measured from the wall, not floor) section, and then transitioned into 15 degree. I would have made the top part steeper(20-25) but didn't have the room behind me.

FLAG
By rogerk
Jan 20, 2014
WilInBris wrote:
What do you see as the positives and negatives? What changes would you make?


Not unlike my home wall. I would move the red section into the middle. That will make for some interesting transitions between sections. You will love the red sections multiple angles as it will really work core strength. However, on the red, the high kickplate section with horizontal roof bit will allow you to get into some rest positions that you don't want. To deal with this, I made it closer to a typical kickplate height(~16") and a 60 degree(measured from the wall, not floor) section, and then transitioned into 15 degree. I would have made the top part steeper(20-25) but didn't have the room behind me.

FLAG
By WilInBris
Jan 22, 2014
rogerk wrote:
I would move the red section into the middle. That will make for some interesting transitions between sections. You will love the red sections multiple angles as it will really work core strength. However, on the red, the high kickplate section with horizontal roof bit will allow you to get into some rest positions that you don't want. To deal with this, I made it closer to a typical kickplate height(~16") and a 60 degree(measured from the wall, not floor) section, and then transitioned into 15 degree. I would have made the top part steeper(20-25) but didn't have the room behind me.


Tevis Blom wrote:
Maybe add horizontal panels on the ceiling to tie all the walls together. The blue 20 degree wall will probably not get used much. Might as well make the middle wall wider and close to 45 degrees. in my experience the less steep walls are just not as fun, and end up not seeing much traffic.



Thanks for the input guys. The roof will definitely get covered. It is on my sketchup but you can't see from that angle I posted. So what if I move the blue wall onto the east wall (currently empty) and extend the green. Thoughts?

Unfortunately the red wall can't go in the middle as that is where the doors are. Not really a fan of getting clocked in the head by a hold.

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By Mile9
From Logan
Jan 27, 2014
kirk
Amazing wall... not mine, but I wish! Belongs to Greg Stokes.

Here is a link to a long article with all the details from planning to construction, plus tons of pics:

Link to the construction article


Greg's Wall
Greg's Wall

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By Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Jan 27, 2014
Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
My friends, I have been dreaming of this for ten years at least and it is finally coming together. Everything you see here was built over the last two weeks. This is a work in progress, more pics to come as more is built :)

the start of something beautiful:

the start of something beautiful <br />
the start of something beautiful


framing the 37

framing the 37
framing the 37


27 and 37

27 and 37
27 and 37


57 connecting to the 27 and the 8 foot roof

the 57 connecting to the 27
the 57 connecting to the 27


the big 45 and the 57

45 and 57
45 and 57

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By TBlom
Jan 28, 2014
^^^ that is going to be an awesome wall!

Cool name by the way...

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By Jamespio
Jan 30, 2014
Need some cocneptual/design help, and this thread seemed like the place. I'm pretty sure I"ll doa lousy job of describing this, and may need pics, but I'll try.

Let's start with there's a swimming pool in the back yard. Not a huge one, but it's in ground, and the deep end is about 9' deep. This of course leads to thoughts of "deep water soloing." The pool is rounded in all its dimensions, and the deep end is approxiamtely 8' away from the side of the one-story garage.

I toyed with building a free-standing structure OVER the deep end, and putting a wall on that. For a vareity of reasons, that doesn't work. I'm thinking more in terms of an 8x12 panel (on appropriate framing for rigidity). The top of the panel has ropes leading back to the garage, so that the angle can be adjusted (it would always be at least somewhat overhanging, say 15*, so that the climber was always over the water, not over the concrete lip of the pool). So far this is all really simple, right?

The hard parts. (1) I need it to be super easy to move. This will keep the love of my life happy when she wants to have a pool party that does NOT involve climbing friends, and make it possible to close the pool each fall and install the safety cover that keeps the pool from being a huge liability risk. (2) I also need to anchor the bottom, so that it doesn't slide out (back towards the garage) when someone is hanging off the top of the wall. I figure three sheets of plywood, framing materials, holds and nuts/bolts is going to weigh a couple hundred pounds, I either need the whole thing on wheels so that I can move it around, or it needs to knock down into smaller pieces pretty easily. I like the on wheels idea, because in the winter there is another spot in the yard where I could move it, throw down some crash pads, and keep climbing.

Ideas appreciated.

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By BCarlson
Jan 30, 2014
James - this sounds like quite the engineering feat.

Do some weight calculations, I think your looking at thousand+ pounds. Plywood alone weighs about 4lbs sqft so that's almost 400 lbs alone, probably a similar amount of weight in framing, then add in the adjustment/pivot hardware and whatever mechanism (wheels, mounts, supports), and you're around 1000 lbs. Add in holds (50-100 lbs), screws fasteners, and I think you'd be over 1000 lbs pretty easily.

Rolling around a 12'x8' (or 8'x12') wall that weights over 1000 lbs would probably need some kind of track system so it doesn't fall over? I don't know what the solution is but it sounds like a lot of effort, time, and money to make your idea feasible.

Modular I imagine the weight/size would be an issue, and then the time it takes to assemble/tear down your wall (2-4 hrs?), sounds like a hassle.

Maybe just build something off the garage and ditch the deep solo idea? If you have the time & resources I think it's possible but its gonna be a bitch.

FLAG
 
By TBlom
Jan 30, 2014
James,
If you have a garage, build your climbing wall there. When you are done climbing, go swimming.
Unless you live someplace very warm, getting wet while climbing will lose its appeal.

Without the cost of wheels, hinges, and engineering feats, you will probably be able to have twice the climbing wall. (and your lady friend will be happier)

FLAG


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