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v-scale vs. climbing scale
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By Nelson Day
From Joshua Tree, CA
May 25, 2012
me (about to sneeze)
Check out this link:

bouldering vs yds scales

Chart at the bottom. Seems reasonable to me, but I don't boulder much/very well. Published by Rock and Ice magazine.

Cheers,
Nelson

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By boulderbum
From NY
Jul 13, 2012
the major difference being, v-hard stuff looks fun, while 5.14+ just looks miserable

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By Jeremy Jennings
Sep 19, 2012
My question is this: What do you do if you climb a V8 drop off boulder problem that ends on a jug, and then you link up to a low crux 5.10d? With that link up grading by hardest move, you have to call it 5.13b. It is obviously way easier than any other 5.13b, or even some 5.12's possibly, but do you grade it 5.13b with a disclaimer that it is super soft? Or do you just call it V8 and say you topped out on a rope...? If anyone has a suggestion that would be great because I have a particular climb in mind...

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By Will S
From Joshua Tree
Sep 19, 2012
Jeremy Jennings wrote:
It is obviously way easier than any other 5.13b, or even some 5.12's possibly



Uh, what? Nothing obvious about that, and I'd disagree completely with the statement. If it's got a V8 crux, it is at least 13b. If it is easier than some 5.12s then the boulder problem is wildly inflated or your 5.12 benchmark is horribly sandbagged.

I'd also add that that R&I grade chart Nelson links above is completely wacked. Inflated on the low end (V3 = 5.12? WTF?), and sandbagged on the high end (V10 = 14a during early years of adoption of the v-scale). As the scale was developed and for the first probably 15 years after pads appeared, the standard comparison was something like this:
V0 = 10
V1 = 11-
V2 = 11
V3 = 11+
V4 = 12-
V5 = 12
V6 = 12+
V7 = 13-
V8 = 13
v9 = 13+
v10 = 14a
v11 = 14b
v12 = 14c

That's about where it stopped, because that was about the top of the scale at the time. Hardest route in the US in those days was still Necessary Evil or Just Do It.

Now maybe that doesn't quite apply anymore because people rated problems softly and as the bouldering boom took off and more areas and problems were developed there was ratings creep requiring realignment. But even through the heavy development period in Bishop in the late 90s, what I've written above was the widely accepted conversion.

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By Rajiv Ayyangar
From Portland, ME
Sep 19, 2012
Cut! Sadly my flash attempt met with dismal pump-failure two bolts later.
Jeremy Jennings wrote:
My question is this: What do you do if you climb a V8 drop off boulder problem that ends on a jug, and then you link up to a low crux 5.10d? With that link up grading by hardest move, you have to call it 5.13b. It is obviously way easier than any other 5.13b, or even some 5.12's possibly, but do you grade it 5.13b with a disclaimer that it is super soft? Or do you just call it V8 and say you topped out on a rope...? If anyone has a suggestion that would be great because I have a particular climb in mind...


Stone Monkey gets 13b, and it's a V8 to an 11-/10+.
mountainproject.com/v/stone-mo...

It's certainly harder than a V7 into a 2-bolt 5.9/10 (Bottom Feeder, 13a):
mountainproject.com/v/bottom-f...

Based on the few 13b's I've been on at the Red and Rumney, I'd disagree that V8+10d is "way easier" than other 13b's. Given that V7=5.13a, your route certainly is not in the 12 range.

If it seems soft to you, maybe you're a really strong boulderer with more power than endurance. But just because it's easier for you doesn't mean it's easier for everyone.

I made a graph of a bunch of routes that I'm familiar with or that are documented in various climbing media. I posted it earlier in this thread, but since people don't read earlier pages...

Rajiv Ayyangar wrote:
I summarized my thoughts in this blog post: The Landscape: a new look at route grades There are clearly a lot of limitations as to what one can claim of such a correspondence. I'm not trying to comment on how routes should be graded. I'm trying to show a pattern in how they are graded.




V to YDS correspondence
V to YDS correspondence

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By Tyler Garrett
From Dallas, TX
Jun 12, 2013
Tall beta on Green Slime vs. Bag Of Devouring. Really fun climb.
Jay Knower wrote:
JJNS, where did you get this scale? It's different than the one I'm used to seeing. I've always thought it goes like this: V4: 5.12- V5: 5.12 V6: 5.12+ V7: 5.13- V8: 5.13 V9: 5.13+ V10: 5.14- etc...


The comparison appears to be opinionated. I, 6'1 180 to 185pds- depending on dieting and cardio, can crush v0-v7 and v5-v7 1 out of 5 I can onsight/flash. But literally every v8,9,10 i've attempted I either injure my tendon or strain a muscle... I would say 5.13- and 5.13 would be guarded by v8s... I'm thinking a more accurate scale would include the negatives in bouldering problems which are readily available at your more serious bouldering gyms or outdoor areas that are established.

Once you start getting into 5.12- 5.12 5.12+ there should be a difference in the bouldering too.

I will start at 5.11 as being a warm up/flash for anyone reading this.

v5 = 5.11
v6 = 5.11+
v6+ = 5.12-
v7- = 5.12
v7 = 5.12+
v7+ = 5.13-
v8 = 5.13
v8+ = 5.13+

I can't say anything beyond 5.13s or v8+, I simply can't handle it on the hands.

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By slim
Administrator
Jun 12, 2013
tomato, tomotto, kill mike amato.
i think willS list is correct.

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By Crag Dweller
From New York, NY
Jun 12, 2013
My navigator keeps me from getting lost
slim wrote:
i think willS list is correct.


+1

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By ascender30
Jun 12, 2013
The ONLY way the afore-posted comparison charts are useful, is if you intend to climb a V-grade route for 60-100 ft (!) The rating scores the HARDEST move on the climb. A 20 ft boulder route with a V5 crux is NOT the same thing as a 100 ft trad route that is graded 5.11d (!!)

....think about it

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By goingUp
Jun 12, 2013
I THINK THERE IS A NOTHER DIFFERENFCE HERE NO ONE HAS MENTIONED YET,
bouldering problems have a set pattern, and marked holds you can generally see and vizualize the moves for from the ground,. you can also work the moves one at a time, often without having to reclimb the entire route..
on a lot of upper level climbs this isnt possible, and the holds are more difficult to find, and read the way the route goes (especially when considering different climbers varying skillsets.

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By Zach Kling
From Indianapolis, Indiana
Jun 12, 2013
Winter bouldering gets cold.
No one mentioned that because climbs are graded on the easiest way up with good beta, not how hard they are to work.

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By cragrat
Apr 7, 2014
australianbouldering.com/table...

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By R. Moran
From Moab , UT
Apr 7, 2014
REtro
goingUp wrote:
I THINK THERE IS A NOTHER DIFFERENFCE HERE NO ONE HAS MENTIONED YET, bouldering problems have a set pattern, and marked holds you can generally see and vizualize the moves for from the ground,. you can also work the moves one at a time, often without having to reclimb the entire route.. on a lot of upper level climbs this isnt possible, and the holds are more difficult to find, and read the way the route goes (especially when considering different climbers varying skillsets.

Guess you never top roped a project or hung and worked moves.

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By Sean Gould
From McCall, Idaho
Sep 18, 2014
I think that, generally, By going Up is right. I'm also more comfortable bouldering v4-6 than climbing 5.12 since working and re-working the moves, in usual situations, is more convenient. Boulder problems seem more amenable to projecting than do routes.

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