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Two ways to jug, which way is better?
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By randy88fj62
Mar 22, 2013
Thunderbolt Peak in the Palisades

If you're using a rope 100% for aid then a larger diameter would make sense. If you do a lot of multi-pitch with a little aiding then a 9.8mm would be fine. The larger diameters are heavier but add the extra security.

I have used my 9.8mm new england rope for almost all my climbing in the last 4 years from sport, trad, and aid / big wall. It's all about hom much you want to pay too. I prefer dry ropes with either bi-pattern or bi-color. I don't want to be looking for a middle mark in the dark when trying to get off a route and the extra cash for a bi-pattern is worth it for me.


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By Liberty
Mar 22, 2013
Me

randy88fj62 wrote:
If you're using a rope 100% for aid then a larger diameter would make sense. If you do a lot of multi-pitch with a little aiding then a 9.8mm would be fine. The larger diameters are heavier but add the extra security. I have used my 9.8mm new england rope for almost all my climbing in the last 4 years from sport, trad, and aid / big wall. It's all about hom much you want to pay too. I prefer dry ropes with either bi-pattern or bi-color. I don't want to be looking for a middle mark in the dark when trying to get off a route and the extra cash for a bi-pattern is worth it for me.

My mid mark is fluorescent pink mason cord. Even worn still visible and you feel it passing through hands too. 9.8?
I thought the minimum recommended is 10 due to abrasion factor. I think it will be 50/50 aide/trad. Im inclined to by a dry 60 m sterling for the season and a 9 60 m static haul line.

The cord is stitched through the rope for security.


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By randy88fj62
Mar 22, 2013
Thunderbolt Peak in the Palisades

I'm not sure how much science is behind the recommended 10mm rope for big wall climbing. It makes common sense that a larger diameter rope will have a better chance of not receiving a core shot.

Let say there is a sharp edge that starts to abrade through your sheath. The difference in wall shickness of a 9.8mm and a 10.2 mm rope is .008 inches which is roughly the thickness of three pieces of paper.

So, does that make a large difference in getting a core shot? I don't believe it would make a difference. Both diameters would get a core shot and ruin your day.

So the question goes on, when does the diameter of a rope get too big and heavy or when does a rope diameter get too small and put your life at greater risk? I don't have that answer.


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