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Treatment for Shoe Stench
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Jul 5, 2012
My friend uruinates in his shoes when they start to smell. The smell goes away, when stinky again, repeat. Seems to work for him. mitchy
From nunya gotdamn business.
Joined Aug 29, 2009
16 points
Jul 5, 2012
i really enjoyed this drive to the tetons... can't...
mitchy wrote:
My friend uruinates in his shoes when they start to smell. The smell goes away, when stinky again, repeat. Seems to work for him.


Actually i'm pretty sure Mitchy is on to something... you should try it. Seriously.

Another fix that works pretty well - drip the blood of a monkey in a circle around your smelly shoes, crush the bones of children and sprinkle in a spiral pattern around your shoe, then ignite the surrounding earth with gasoline.
dirtbag
From Bellingham, WA
Joined Feb 4, 2007
143 points
Administrator
Jul 5, 2012
Me
I think Dirtbag has the solution: clean your feet well beforehand and dry them out immediately afterward.

Till now I've always worn socks and not had a problem. But that will soon change with the new "performance" shoes I'll be receiving. So I've thought about doing something in addition and wonder if others have tried the following.

Would it help by taking steps to keep your feet dry? For example, spray them with an antiperspirant just before putting in your shoes and perhaps also dusting them with chalk?




Jon Nelson
Joined Sep 17, 2011
4,420 points
Jul 5, 2012
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Pea...
Anti-fungal foot spray is a must for foot stench, especially with synthetic shoes. Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
Joined Jan 1, 2001
1,532 points
Jul 5, 2012
Freezing temperatures don't kill bacteria or fungi, they just slow down their growth. So freezing your shoes won't help. Bacteria and fungi require moisture for growth, so the best thing is to let your shoes dry thoroughly between uses. I leave mine hanging off my pack after climbing, and I've gotten 4-5 resoles out of each pair and no stink.

But if you've let your shoes get funky, there's little you can do about it now. Cat litter and baking soda might help for the short term, but as soon as they get sweaty and moist again, they're going to start smelling.
John Johnson
From Boulder, CO
Joined Jul 30, 2001
5 points
Jul 5, 2012
Try a powder containing 5%+ zinc oxide. You can sometime find it in the baby aisle (used for diaper rash) or the sunscreen aisle.

I've used it on sopping wet trail runners forgotten in a hot car, work boots, etc with excellent results every time.
Mike Collier
Joined Aug 21, 2010
0 points
Jul 5, 2012
John Johnson wrote:
Freezing temperatures don't kill bacteria or fungi, they just slow down their growth. So freezing your shoes won't help.


Agreed. Cant believe how many idiots buy into this. I wonder if they realize freezing stuff just preserves it so when you let it thaw out the bacteria is still there...
BurtMachlan
Joined May 21, 2012
6 points
Jul 5, 2012
Someone musta skipped that day during science class. mitchy
From nunya gotdamn business.
Joined Aug 29, 2009
16 points
Jul 5, 2012
I've used baking soda with good success. dump a bunch in and shake to coat right after use (still sweaty) let them sit until dry and that should kill the odor. only downside is that your feet will be coated in baking soda for a use or two. Dan Bachen
Joined Mar 8, 2010
268 points
Jul 5, 2012
I have another friend that queefs on said shoes and smell is tolerable for awhile. mitchy
From nunya gotdamn business.
Joined Aug 29, 2009
16 points
Jul 5, 2012
John Marsella wrote:
I bet if you have access to an autoclave, that could work too....


I thought about that too -- bacteria can't survive temperatures over 160 or so for very long, so you could try baking them for a while. But if you do that, you run the risk of melting your shoes or the glue that holds them together.

You can also try smoking them, but they're hard to keep lit.
John Johnson
From Boulder, CO
Joined Jul 30, 2001
5 points
Jul 5, 2012
In my experience, the cat litter method doesn't work and simply washing them doesn't work.

Obviously, there is a big difference between pet urine odor and shoe odor. But, both are very difficult to get rid of. A method that works for pet urine odor is to spray the urine spot with vinegar and let it dry. Then, you cover the area with baking soda and wet it with a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and detergent. You let that dry and then vacuum up the baking soda (you could rinse it out with shoes). It works very well, better than the products they sell for it. I've been wondering if it would work for smelly shoes without damaging the shoes, but I don't have any old shoes to try it out on.
diatom
Joined Nov 24, 2010
0 points
Jul 5, 2012
The Dread Pirate Killis wrote:
Can't believe that BurtMachlan is posting negative shithead comments impugning others' intelligence. Oh wait! Yes I can! Evolvs do fine if you Woolite them. Same design, materials as Anasazis. They're not some stink magnet, they're synthetics that are cheap enough that everyone has a pair or three. Wash, let dry, repeat. Clean shoes. Man, everyone is SO much stupider than me. Wait, that's Burt's line.


Well, do you believe that putting your shoes in the freezer will kill the bacteria and make them come out smelling good?
BurtMachlan
Joined May 21, 2012
6 points
Jul 8, 2012
My solution was staying away from evolve... TheChen
From Salem, OR
Joined Apr 19, 2012
2 points
Jul 8, 2012
About half way up the East Arete on Illumination R...
Nobody uses foot powder? Easy fix. Ben Beckerich
From saint helens, oregon
Joined Jun 24, 2011
267 points
Jul 8, 2012
I have the nastiest Evolv defys, or at least I did until I soaked them in 98% rubbing alcohol overnight. Rinsed and dried and they were like a new shoe again, without all the odor. Not something I would try with a leather shoe, but works great on synthetics. JoeR
From Eugene, OR
Joined Aug 22, 2011
26 points
Jul 9, 2012
I have not tried this but I think it makes sense: if you have one of these little UV sticks for water treatment (kills bacteria), I would think that sticking it in each shoe for a few cycles might do the trick... I'd be interested to know if this works. Let me know! Eric and Lucie
From Boulder, CO
Joined Oct 14, 2004
154 points


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