Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
The Road To The Nose
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 2 of 2.  <<First   <Prev   1  2
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
By Kevin Stricker
From Evergreen, CO
Mar 24, 2010
It's good to have goals to live up to, and great to have time to focus on those goals. I think where we get in trouble is when we sacrifice most of the rest of our lives for some big dream, and because of conditions or chance end up not achieving what we set out to do.

I think any climber who sets his mind to it and takes the time to learn the techniques and gain the fitness can get up the Nose. I have heard though that only about 50% of the people who set out to climb the route actually make it to the top. Most of the people I have passed when I have been on the Nose look to be in physical shape to make it up the wall, but I know many of them didn't make it to the top. It's my belief that it is due mostly to lack of skill and fear. Climbing 5.10 and knowing how to aid will not get you to the top of the wall. Knowing how to follow and haul I think are much more important skills. Being "unkillable" will just get you deeper into trouble, and if you go up there planning to spend 6 days in the Summer your chances of success are quite slim. Most important is to feel at ease in that environment, and the only way you do that is with experience.

So back to the original point. Why are you going to give up your whole summer just to climb a rock? Why not just spend a couple weeks a year in the Valley and know that sooner than later you will climb the route in good style? Is getting up El Cap regardless more important than having a good time? Do you even have a partner that shares your dream that you can train with? The Nose is a great climb and worth aspiring to and training for. Just make sure you don't give up your life to do it.

Being a dirt bag is way over rated. Most of the guys hanging out for long stretches in the Valley do more drinking than climbing. Anyways good luck in your journey.

FLAG
By ToTheNose
Mar 25, 2010
Kevin Stricker wrote:
It's good to have goals to live up to, and great to have time to focus on those goals. I think where we get in trouble is when we sacrifice most of the rest of our lives for some big dream, and because of conditions or chance end up not achieving what we set out to do. I think any climber who sets his mind to it and takes the time to learn the techniques and gain the fitness can get up the Nose. I have heard though that only about 50% of the people who set out to climb the route actually make it to the top. Most of the people I have passed when I have been on the Nose look to be in physical shape to make it up the wall, but I know many of them didn't make it to the top. It's my belief that it is due mostly to lack of skill and fear. Climbing 5.10 and knowing how to aid will not get you to the top of the wall. Knowing how to follow and haul I think are much more important skills. Being "unkillable" will just get you deeper into trouble, and if you go up there planning to spend 6 days in the Summer your chances of success are quite slim. Most important is to feel at ease in that environment, and the only way you do that is with experience. So back to the original point. Why are you going to give up your whole summer just to climb a rock? Why not just spend a couple weeks a year in the Valley and know that sooner than later you will climb the route in good style? Is getting up El Cap regardless more important than having a good time? Do you even have a partner that shares your dream that you can train with? The Nose is a great climb and worth aspiring to and training for. Just make sure you don't give up your life to do it. Being a dirt bag is way over rated. Most of the guys hanging out for long stretches in the Valley do more drinking than climbing. Anyways good luck in your journey.

I agree with you on many of your points. I think there is certain misunderstanding on what I'm planning to do. I'm not just gonna keep bouncing off The Nose until I get it. I want to be in the area and climb many other routes. From long free climbs to grade V aid routes before I go do The Nose.
I'm not old old old, but old enough to regret things I should've dedicated myself 100% to it but didn't. I rather fail while trying, rather than fail to try. I'll ask my boss if three months off is possible. If the plan works out, I'll definitely let you guys know.
While we are on the subject of historical routes, how did you guys collect so much info? I would love to build my climbing library involving history of climbing.

FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 2 of 2.  <<First   <Prev   1  2