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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Nov 9, 2008
rockerwaves
Andrew, the fly fishing sounds like good fun. I know some places here on the north shore that might be fun to try it. We do have some beach brake but due to the os reef most surf is nocked down by the time it gets to the beach. I called Adam and left a message about his beach property in Nniqueraga. I really haven't heard of them having any problems other than tieing up money for a beach spot when there is a big world out there with great surfing. That is a super photo that you posted.WOW,What a right hander, 4ever down the line!

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By Andrew Gram
Administrator
From Salt Lake City, UT
Nov 10, 2008
Andrew Gram
That wave is in Troncones Mexico. I love that area - a friendly scene and miles of surf like that. It can get huge too. A few of the days I was there it looked like Zicatela in Puerto Escondido, but with nobody(especially me - yikes!) on it.

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By kirra
Nov 10, 2008
Credits: Marty TwoBulls m2bulls.com  indiancountry...
can you also include a little sound-bite-link of ocean background sounds too please thank you

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By Buff Johnson
Nov 10, 2008
smiley face
hey nice avatard, the squirt & scram

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By PNUT
From San Diego CA
Nov 10, 2008
Captian Zero is a great book!!

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By kirra
Nov 10, 2008
Credits: Marty TwoBulls m2bulls.com  indiancountry...
Mark Nelson wrote:
Here's one to tickle yer fancy or better yet, a melody hey nice avatard, the squirt & scram

thanks mark.... hmmm these 2 links just blew-up my desktop

anyone else got a sound bite

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By Rick Witting
Nov 10, 2008
The Needle, Prospect Mtn (not RMNP)Photo by Jay Eg...
Olaf Mitchell wrote:
Rick, from that impressive list of spots that you have paddled out at, I would say that you have considerable surf experience. I feel that just paddling out with the intent to catch a wave while observing the universal rights of way (locals have all the rights), is surfing! Catching a wave is a bonus. Riding it? Well, that's the prize. We are all Kooks in the ocean. If you want to be humbled, watch the dolphins surf. The good surfers that I know live near the ocean and surf the same breaks often. The GREAT surfers that I know grew up at the beach and ditched a lot of classes in their youth. There are so many ever changing elements involved in surfing, tides, currents, bottom configuration, swell size,interval,and direction. Just to name a few. For years I traveled to surf destinations and found that unless I stayed for at least a month, my skills really didnít improve. I also have used the assistance of area locals. They are respected and know the area.They will usually put you in the right spot and run interference so that you get some waves too. A while back I made the decision and moved to Hawaii so I could surf and wave sail all the time. I donít regret that decision. Since I have been injured Iím spending a lot of time reminiscing my climbing days and following MP and Super Taco. Thanks for posting.


Olaf, thanks for the encouragement. I respect the rights of way of the locals and I have found most to be really supportive. They have probably saved my bacon a few times! I have seen dolphins riding the waves of my dive boat until they get bored. Pretty amazing. There is a lot to process while surfing, reading the wave, timing, balance. I'm comfortable in the water, but I've come close to puking from the exertion of paddling through the surf just to get beyond the break. My best to you on your recovery. That's always tough.

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By J. Thompson
From denver, co
Nov 10, 2008
Trundling a death block. Photo by Dan Gambino.
PNUT wrote:
Captian Zero is a great book!!



You should read Cosmic bandito's!! Very little surfing...but holy shit is it good!

Also His newest book....Can't you get along with anyone....is good but has issue's with publisher's.

I happen to have an orginal copy...with my name in it since I pre-ordered(yeah i'm a goof)....but they ran into legal issue's and the publisher quit!

Weisbecker has his own publishing Co. now and will be releasing the controversial book on his own.

josh

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By kurt smith
Nov 11, 2008
good post. I started surfing the year before i started climbing-Maui 1978. I have surfed on and off over the years and 2 years ago got back into it full bore. My wife and i have 3 boards and our closest surf to the New River Gorge (home) is Va. Beach. We also get to OBX twice a year as well as FL. I surfed LBI NJ last month and that was fun. I want to go to Mex in March for my 45th b day and surf a week or so...

Kurt Smith

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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Nov 11, 2008
rockerwaves
"We should give thanks that there are waves, or else all the surfers would be rock climbers" Yvon Chouinard, told to me by Kevin Donald back in 1978

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By Fat Paul
From Central, NJ
Nov 11, 2008
me
Cool discussion Olaf, great to hear that others on MP ride waves. I'm a long-time surfer who started climbing to compensate for summer flat spells on the right coast. I soon found that climbing was as gratifying as surfing, and try to climb whenever there are no waves. I am lucky to have surfed many exceptional breaks throughout the Caribbean, Central America, Fiji,and New Zealand, but many outposts remain on my travel list. We have had a recent good run of swell here in NJ with some clean barreling days. I recently started riding a performance long board and like the challenge of riding it in overhead surf. Looking forward to the cold water of winter since it cuts down on the crowd.

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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Nov 11, 2008
rockerwaves



So we have yet another climber with a surfing problem posting on Mountain Project!
Aloha Fat Paul,
WOW, You have definantly been hitting the destination surf spots.
I'll bet you have a whole bunch of great stories with all that traveling.Feel free to share a few if you get a chance. K?
I have been riding high performance long boards a lot myself since I have been here on Maui. I have three at the present. A lot of the best waves around here in the winter are on the outside reef and they are long (20min each way) paddles. The winter waves get pretty heavy and broken long boards are real common on the out side reef.In fact I have a buckled Dave Mell 9'0""aggro tanker"just waiting for some intensive care. My favorite board is the one that I just got a wave on. They're all soo different and do every thing great but in a different way.
With the stand up paddle craze in full swing. It can be hard to get a wave if there are a several of them out at the same time especially if they are all good surfers and wave hogs.I find that my Walden 9'0" magic model evens the odds quite well.I just have to sit a little deeper and closer to the peak.My other h.p.l.b. is a 8' 6" Doug Houtt and I can't say enough about how crisp and snappy that sporty little board is. It's an epoxy "Surftech" and seems to be the winter long board of choice by a lot of my bros as well.
Get somewaves for me I need a fix.if you check out the wave models for this part of the Pacific you'll notice that we have a substantial NW swell marching across the pacific aimed right at this rock that I live on.
I am on the bench indefinitely, but I'm going to try and be a good sport and take lots of photos of my amigos,RIPPING!


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By Nate Oakes
Nov 13, 2008
~2000' above Boulder.
Be careful out there...

Story here.


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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Nov 13, 2008
rockerwaves
Nate,It sounds like the kite boarder got smacked and that's what he deserved. I hope that the whale didn't get tangled in those kevlar kite lines!
It 's fairly common to be wave sailing around here and have a whale breach right in front of you. It seams to happen to me at least once a year. It is very cool when it happens.
That's one thing that I enjoy about windsurfing,you see so much sea life.
Often I launch at Hookipa Beach Park and wavesail all the breaks along the 7 mile stretch of coast to Kanaha Beach Park. You see a lot of sealife when you get off shore a ways.

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By Fat Paul
From Central, NJ
Nov 14, 2008
me
Hey Olaf, checked out your photo's and saw that shot of Woody's was taken by Buzzy Kerbox - big wave, and islands tow surfing pioneer? You probably have some great stories if your keeping company with that crew. Peace

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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Nov 14, 2008
rockerwaves
FatPaul,yes that is the same Buzzy Kerbox. Buzzy is a friend that lives here on Maui. I have surfed, wavesailed, and worked with Buzzy
Although he is retired from pro surfing after a great and successful career he is still a very active waterman. Buzzy is always out doing whatever is happening, be it, big wave toe in, stand up paddle, wave sailing, or just ripping it up.
My friend Geampaolo shot a great photo of Buzzy at Hookipa this week and posted it on his blogg last wed.It is the last image he posted that day.Check it out I think you will like it.
.mauisurfreport.blogspot.com

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By Matt Nelson
From Pueblo, CO
Nov 23, 2008
Me rappin...
Always good surfing here at North Shore, haven't tried it yet but my neighbor is big into it...
Passing on the knowledge...
Passing on the knowledge...


This is at Chuns Reef North Shore of Oahu

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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Dec 1, 2008
rockerwaves
Although I had a great report from my doc last week I am still sooo very much out of the surf/wave sail game for some time to come. At least I can now swim and train vigorously and with out restrictions!(scary!)
We have a massive N/W swell on hand for the next week here in Hawaii but once again I will be on the side lines rooting my bro's on and taking photos.
You wouldn't be checking this thread if you weren't a surfer or a surfer at heart so I assume your interested, so, Here's how Uncle Pat explains it:"The jet stream has set up a large equatorward loop in the central north Pacific. This is the Aleutian low, a feature seen in climatology based on the persistence of low pressure in a broad area straddling the dateline between 35-50įN latitude. The synoptic, or daily changing large scale pattern, of the coming days shows a family of extratropical cyclones forming off Japan then tracking east to reinforce the mother low pressure area just south of the Aleutians."

Check the website of the Eddie Aikau event at Waimea, 'cause it may easily be held. Tuesday and Thursday are my best guesses.

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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Dec 5, 2008
rockerwaves
Since I can't surf I think I'll share another ocean memory.

The parking lot isnít empty but there are a lot of vacant spaces.

Walking through the kiavi trees out to the beach I get my first view of the ocean.

Iím wide eyed and I have a lump in my throat as I stare into the winter swell. With my binoculars I watch one wave after another close out completely .

The waves are so big that I question my sanity for even thinking about paddling out!

I am preoccupied and I donít realize that my friend Dave has arrived at the scean.
Dave looks at the conditions and says, ď Olaf, this is dangerous!"
I reply, " It could be Dave, but lets paddle out, we don't have to drop in on any of them!"
Having surfed this spot many times we are fully aware of how the hydraulics work over this section of reef.
The size and direction of this swell has changed the character of everything.
The main peak is much further out than normal and there is a breaking wave in the channel.
There are also occasional sneaker peaks popping up in odd places.

I manage to catch few smaller waves on the inside left and started to calm down a bit. In fact I was having fun.

On the horizon I see this "macker" rolling in and Dave and I both start paddling for our lives, were paddling up a dead vertical wall of water! Our timing was good and we both made it over that one.
That really got my adrenaline pumping!
Dave says, "Humm! Olaf, that one was big!"
I reply, "Yeah Dave it was, but take a look at this one!"
The next wave of the set comes out of nowhere.
It totally creams us!
All that I have time to do is take a deep breath, relax, and hang on to my board.
After tumbling in the torrent for a while I surface and I think, WOW! that one wasnít so bad.
I look to make sure if my board is still in one piece. I find itís still in tact.

Thanks to the long intervals between the larger sets the paddle back out side is casual.

Back in the line up, I notice each surfers face is sporting a serious expression and there is relatively no idle conversation. There isnít a defined line up, the waves are erratic and the current is so strong that itís hard to hold any kind of position.
It's every man for him self.
If some fool wants to role the dice and drop in on one of these waves, every one wishes him well and gets out of the way!

While Iím patiently sitting out side what appears to be a perfect peak comes my way.
I turn and paddle for it.
My timing is late and I am sucked over the falls.
I take a long freefall followed by a violent thrashing!
Next, I get to walk on the reef for a while, and my only thought is that, I need air!
Pulling hand over hand on my leash takes me to the surface. Iím careful not to pull too hard. Once in the past, I actually pulled my board right into my face. That proved to be way more dangerous than the wave.

Iím shaken from the violent pounding of the last wave but paddle back out. I sit the outside the breaking waves for a good long while.
After the last thrashing, Iím not eager to put my life back on the line right away.
.

Itís some time before I able to relax.
Eventually my thoughts turn to idle daydreaming. Thoughts like what I want to be when I grow up or that bonehead thing that I wish I hadnít said last night replace the tension and terror of my last wipeout.

Itís a lot of work to hold my position where I think the wave will peak.

Some of the other surfers are sitting inside and left. Theyíre trying to surf in the safety zone created by the left shoulder section. This strategy often works but today the left channel is closing out.
A very steep board-breaking wave takes its place and is catching the unsuspecting surfers off guard.

Then low and behold the most perfect wave manifests right before my eyes. I really donít have to try to catch it. It is just that perfect.
Two strokes are all that it takes and Iím on it! Iím dropping down the face of this magnificent wonder of nature. It is a perfectly pealing left hand wave with a steep shoulder that goes on forever! It feels like some three star intermediate groomed run at Vail.
With total commitment I set my rail and initiate the bottom turn. I then climb back to the lip and cut back to the peak. With the peak crumbling just inches behind my fin, I smack the lip and then repeat the aforementioned, seemingly interminable drop, rails digging and fins threatening to break loose but still holding their track I glide into the channel!

I hear ďhootsĒ from the other surfers! I know that I have just dropped in on one of the best waves of the day.
I spend another hour getting clobbered without getting another wave.
It Ďs a long paddle in but I have had enough of this brand of fun for one day!

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By Andrew Gram
Administrator
From Salt Lake City, UT
Dec 6, 2008
Andrew Gram
Thanks for that Olaf. Helps the inland folks get their fix for the day. I'll read that kind of story anytime.

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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Dec 6, 2008
rockerwaves
I'm livin it!!!!

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By Fat Paul
From Central, NJ
Dec 8, 2008
me
Olaf,thanks for sharing that moment. It must had been sizable if the channel was showing. So,how big was it????

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By Olaf Mitchell
From Paia, Maui, Hi,
Dec 9, 2008
rockerwaves
I woke to the sound of rain. I looked over at the clock and then out the open curtains. The whole North Shore was socked in so I drifted back into a contented slumber.
I only allowed myself a brief nap and then rose and headed into the kitchen and started the morning rituals. I brewed fresh French Roast from Anthonyís, checked my e-mail, and then most importantly checked the surf reports.
The three different reports were conflicting and vague in their details since buoy # 1 was out of commission. It appeared that today anything could happen.
A brilliant rainbow manifested stretching from the West Maui Mountains down to Kanaha Beach Park. Clear blue replaced the gray and the view from my deck was of occasional white lines across the length of the entire outside reef.

I attempted to address domestic projects but I was distracted by the dramatic view from my deck. I was constantly picking up the binoculars to check out the surf.
I decided that it was time to go down and take a closer look at the ocean.
I didnít know what the day might bring so I loaded my truck with surfboards and sailboard gear and headed for the beach.

From my house in the upcountry village of Heilimilie I drove down Baldwin Avenue through the pineapple and sugar cane fields, passing the old dilapidated sugar mill, picturesque parks, island estates and immaculately maintained churches towards Paia town.
I could see that the waves on the outside reef were giant. They were often completely closing out from Pawella Point to Pier One.

This was a classic winter swell. My Gut feeling was that there wasnít going be any place on the north shore for a mortal to wind surf or surf. In fact, I wouldnít be surprised if they were towing in at Peahi ďJawsĒ today.

In Paia I took a right on Hana Hi way and drove to Hookipa Beach Park.

The lifeguard tower was closed and the beach was sporting high surf warning flags.
The parking lot was empty except for a few hardcore surfers that were trying to visualize a weakness that would allow access through the massive white water barriers.
There were the usual tourists over at the pavilions overlook. They were probably hoping that some one would risk paddling out in to the giant waves. It would be good entertainment and a good story for when they returned to their lives on the mainland.

My gut feeling was that I should go straight to Kanaha.
With this swell direction, the island of Molokai shadows the waves and the chances of actually getting a session in, is better.

I continued my tour of the possible sailing spots from Hookipa to Kanaha.
I made a right turn off of the Hana Hiway just past Mommaís Fish House and wove my way through the tight little neighborhood behind it.

I found a stealth parking spot close to the narrow public beach access path.
Each step I took down the narrow, palm canopied path, between the concrete wall and rusty chain link fence the air grew thicker with salty spray and the thunderous sound of crashing waves became more intense.
I descended the ancient concrete steps onto the rocky beach and discovered that there were not only giant waves but there was wind. Very light wind!
The conditions appeared sketchy!
More sailors showed up and a few were rigging at this point.
(I n the back of my mind I thought that I should keep heading down the beach and look for another place to sail.)
The peanut gallery had already assembled
ďRagsĒ, was the only one out. He had made it through the impact zone and was getting some great waves.
Torri was rigging and he was wearing his sexy new aloha print bikini.
Peter, Kiwi Tim, Piano Mark, Debby Brown, Frank, and Dale had already had their first session and were buzzing with adrenaline.
Tom Krebs, Rodger, Jake the Snake, and Man Who Screams At Rocks were rigging their sails.
After procrastinating for a while, I went back to my truck and got my gear
I took my time rigging my 5.0m sail on the rocky beach. I tried to visualize the channels and time the sets. There were defiantly periods of less activity. Patience was going to be critical.
My adrenaline was pumping; I had an anxious lump in my throat as I carried my gear across the boulder field of a beach and stepped off of the slippery stones into the water. There was absolutely no wind on the inside. I had to swim with my gear through the rocks.
The current in this narrow channel was flowing like a river. It wanted to push me into the rocks on the other side.
I have made several trips through that bone yard over the years.
It is not a fun ride!
Itís very hard on the gear and dangerous!
I swam as hard as I could!

The wind was very light and it took a long time but I was finally able to get a water start. I then slogged out like a sitting duck in to the impact zone.

With so little power in my sail and no defined channel it was next to impossible to penetrate the first section of 10í white water and I was denied access time after time.

My sail was down in the water. All I could do is try to keep my gear in launch position and drift with the ripping turbulent current and wait for a gust.
Dealing with the strong current and mixed up hidrolics generated by the mast high waves was no easy chore.

Realistically though, it was about normal for this spot thatís called ďthe toilet bowlĒ

Eventually, I found enough wind to get underway.

IĎm rolling the dice, hoping for a break in the 15+í sets long enough to sneak outside.

Timing and luck are very important in wave sailing and this time mine turned out to be bad!
I was underpowered and out of the foot straps. I was determined to force or should I say will my way through this impact zone!
As I was slogging over my first wave, I thought that I had it. I knew that it was going to be close!

The wave broke right when I was at the peak and it pulled me back over the falls!
As I was freefalling backwards I shoved my rig away from me. I really didnít want to be tangled up in my gear while this monster had its way with me.
I was pushed so deep that I was disorientated and confused as to which way the surface was!
If this wasnít bad enough I had to absorb two more waves of equal size before the set subsided.
When I finally reached the surface I was swimming in an ocean of foam and desperate for a breath!

At the launch I thought that this was insane, now I was sure of it!

That set had just clobbered me! Each of the waves had held me under for a very long time and I really needed air!

I also needed to find my gear.

Judging from the force of that set I figured that it had at least broken my mast and who knows what else.

In the distance I could see my red sail occasionally getting pummeled in the white water. It appeared to be in one piece.

I have heard many stories from sailors in this exact spot that have completely lost their entire rig. I swam as hard as I could and finally caught up to it.
After a thorough examination of my equipment I concluded that all was in tact.

My adrenaline level had receded to merely maximum.
I managed to compose myself and realized that I was in a lull between sets. There was just enough wind to get a water start. I pumped my board on to a plane, hooked in, put my feet in the straps, and raced for the out side.

It was obvious that there was only one intelligent thing to do. I had to sail up wind and get my self into posisition to get back to the narrow channel at the launch spot.

If I couldnít make the channel where I launched the alternatives were poor at best and I wonít go into them at the moment.

The wind on the outside was favorable and I made good progress and shortly put myself in position to shoot for the narrow channel

On my first attempt to go in I was presented with a beautiful, giant, perfectly formed mountain of a wave. I thought that if I donít ride this wave, I would forever regret it.

I dropped in and pinched left up the wave. I allowed it to form enough to go down the line. I chose to go a bit early so that I could kick out the back and still make it over the next wave with out being caught in its impact zone. While going down the line it occurred to me just how foolish and dangerous it was to be riding a wave of this magnitude!
I dropped for a seemingly interminable amount of time and distance. My board felt stable and the wind in my sail was just perfect. Actually it was easy to negotiate.
All the stress and fear of the beating that I was dealt earlier was replaced with euphoria! I had a colossal sense of well being!
The wave held up for longer than I can describe but finally I kicked out the back and casually sailed over the next wave of the set.

I told my self ďOK, you got one, So Go In Now!Ē

I had every intention of heading for the beach, but when I did another of those beautiful giants manifested.
There was nothing that I could do after experiencing the last one but take this one as well.

I fully intended to go in. But perfect wave after perfect wave presented itís self and I just had to take them.

Eventually a door of opportunity opened that put me in just the right position to head for the channel. The wave behind me broke, and I was able to stay just far enough ahead of it and use its power to push me through narrow gap all the way through the channel and right up to the beach.

The launch area was charged with the energy of the sailors that had challenged these conditions and through some twist of fate made it back.
Everyone had a dramatic story to tell.
There was broken equipment everywhere on the beach.

Tom, after having a great session, had been caught in side with out any wind and had taken the swim around the point to the back of the bay. He and Tad had gone for a ride down to the Blue Tile House and picked up Frank who had broken down out side. He had to break his gear down and paddle in.
I noticed Justin walking across the rocks with his gear and a broken mast
Mike had twisted his foot in the straps and was limping severely but still joking.
Dale had just destroyed his Sailworks 5.3m sail and came in on the rocks.

With every one accounted for and the day winding down we enjoyed some ice-cold Coronaís and talked story for a while more. We then loaded our gear and headed back home having had another great day at the beach!


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By Buff Johnson
Dec 10, 2008
smiley face
stealth parking spot

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By J. Thompson
From denver, co
Dec 10, 2008
Trundling a death block. Photo by Dan Gambino.
Check this out.....

banditobooks.com/ezine/absolut...


The video is on Weisbecker's site....look around there's plenty of cool stuff.

josh

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