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Suggestions for climbing jacket
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By Paul-B
Jan 20, 2013
Flakes of Wrath

I have been wanting to get a light/thin jacket for rock climbing. My ideal jacket would be wind resistant, abrasion resistant, breathes very well, stretchy, and at least a little bit of warmth. I like jackets are that are very athletically cut, as I am skinny, and have long arms.

I have been eyeing the Patagonia Simple Guide (really liked it, but the arms are a hair short, and going up a size gets very boxy on me), the Outdoor Research Ferrosi Hooded Jacket (haven't found a place to try it on yet), the First ascent Sandstone Jacket (tried it on and hated it, fabric felt like crap, plus it looked silly), and I saw someone climbing in a Rab Shadow Hoody today. I liked the look of that shadow hoody, but it is a bit expensive for fleece. Any other jackets I should look at? Thoughts on the ones I mentioned?


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By Mostafa
From Las Vegas, NV
Jan 20, 2013
Cujo 5.11d Red Rocks

I've been happy with my Marmot Rom Jacket. marmot.com/products/rom_jacket


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By Sunny-D
From SLC, Utah
Jan 21, 2013
Top of Jah-Man Sister Superior

Look at some of the other Rab offerings they make really nice stuff at a reasonable cost. The Alpine jacket comes to mind or the sawtooth both quite a bit less expensive then the Shadow hoodie. Really great jackets with nice long arms .
Dallen


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By Dane
Jan 21, 2013
Cham '11

Second the RAB idea. They should give a great fit.


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Jan 21, 2013
El Chorro

You can't go wrong with Rab. One company that has not sold out. Many others are more focused on selling cheap jackets to urbanites than they are in innovation and quality. But not Rab. They are legit. Love Marmot as well. The dri-clime jackets are excellent.


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By BHMBen
From The Deeper South
Jan 21, 2013
Post climb snack... <br /> <br />Photo is of Strappo Hughes, taken in the Yosemite Lodge parking lot in 1982 by Russ Walling.

I have worm my OR Ferrosi halfzip (no hood) almost every day since I got it for Christmas. Very abrasion and wind resistant, would satisfy your fit criteria. Not extremely warm, but definately adds more warmth than the thinner windshirts such as Marmot Ion or Trailwind. A bit less warmth than the DriClime, which is also a favorite piece. Like RAB, OR tends to keep it pushing, in my opinion. My new favorite all-conditions combination for upper body warmth is a synthetic tee, Patagonia R1, and OR Ferrosi. During winter, with R1 and softshell bottoms.


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By knowbuddy
Jan 21, 2013
uh huh

Check out the ibex equipo jacket. It's fucking amazing


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By S Denny
From Carbondale, CO
Jan 21, 2013

I've been wearing the Adidas Terrex windstopper softshell and I absolutely love it. Except for the looped waist cords, always clipping them to my harness. lame.


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By Paul-B
Jan 21, 2013
Flakes of Wrath

Thanks for the responses. Tried on that Marmot ROM jacket, it was nice, but I am trying to stay away from windstopper, as I don't think it will be quite as breathable as I want when I am actually climbing Wind Pro/air permeable softshell is more what I am looking for. I think I will wait and find that Ferrosi jacket in stock, try it on and decide between that and the Rab.

That Ibex jacket looks nice, but at $350 dollars I could probably buy one of every other jacket I was considering. My pockets aren't that deep.


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By DannyUncanny
From Vancouver
Jan 21, 2013

Check out the OR Centrifuge. It's billed as a fleece, but it's kind of like a light softshell. Brushed material front, hood (balaclava), and elbows, thumb loops, high hand warmer pockets, more breathable material in the back, inside of arms, and pits.

I have been wearing it with a long sleeve base layer for snow/ice climbing down to about 0 F. When I stop moving, I throw a down jacket over top. The hood fits nicely under a helmet, so I don't need a hat.

The orange that I have is much brighter than the photo here. Enough so that I feel a little awkward wearing it around town.


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By CJC
Jan 21, 2013

Westcomb Rebel Hoody

highly recommended


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By Shelton Hatfield
From Austin, Texas
Jan 21, 2013
Photo by Damien

Paul-B wrote:
Thanks for the responses. Tried on that Marmot ROM jacket, it was nice, but I am trying to stay away from windstopper, as I don't think it will be quite as breathable as I want when I am actually climbing Wind Pro/air permeable softshell is more what I am looking for. I think I will wait and find that Ferrosi jacket in stock, try it on and decide between that and the Rab. That Ibex jacket looks nice, but at $350 dollars I could probably buy one of every other jacket I was considering. My pockets aren't that deep.

I wouldn't rule out the ROM as not breathable enough due to being windstopper. The material under the arms is much thinner and stretchier, and allows for heat to vent as long as your arms aren't pinned to your sides (which you may end up doing up on top of a formation if the wind really starts howling). But you have good venting options between the velcro wrist cuffs, elastic waist cuff, and the zipper.

I own the Marmot ROM and have quite liked it for a climbing jacket. It's really comfortable unlike some other softshells I've tried, and when I found it on sale the price was right. I've worn a couple of small holes in it but I think it's actually doing quite well considering I've subjected it to some abuse in wide cracks and a late night run through the Chasm of Doom.


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By Tom Mulholland
From #1 Cheese Producing State!
Jan 21, 2013
Whiskey-a-Go-Go

I really like the Offwidth jacket from Mountain Hardware. It's stretchy and the material seems rather abrasion resistant, although I haven't ever actually used it in an offwidth (usually get plenty warm just thrashing around). It's a great around town jacket too, for me, and has a nice athletic cut - I'm pretty skinny, but not tall (5'10"). It's a pretty light jacket - it probably wouldn't be enough for 45 degrees and under, unless you're constantly moving, but it works well for me as I usually warm up a ton with a little athletic activity.

My only complaint is that it's a little short - sits right at the belt line, which isn't great when biking.

www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%27s-Offwidth%E2%84%A2-Jacket/OM>>>

  • Edit: the current colors don't seem as nice as when I bought it (1 or 2 years ago), so maybe look for past models?


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By M Sprague
Administrator
From New England
Jan 21, 2013
Lichen head. Me, with my usual weatherbeaten, lichen covered look from scrubbing a new route.


Why is it that so many outdoors clothing manufacturers seem to pick the nastiest colors imaginable. I remember reading something about colors and their ranking for attracting mates and that puke orange I think was on the very bottom. They must pick them so you get sick of them quickly and buy another. There are lots of great designs out there ruined by the colors.


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Jan 21, 2013
El Chorro

M Sprague wrote:
Why is it that so many outdoors clothing manufacturers seem to pick the nastiest colors imaginable. I remember reading something about colors and their ranking for attracting mates and that puke orange I think was on the very bottom. They must pick them so you get sick of them quickly and buy another.


They do it to be different. When a company is very confident in a product, they try to make it in colors that no one else is using - the product will build a reputation faster that way because it is easily recognizable. No one is going to coffee that OR hoody with some other crap product.

Two more awesome companies mentioned - Westcomb and Outdoor Research.


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By DannyUncanny
From Vancouver
Jan 21, 2013

That Color is kind of off. It actually looks more like this. I still think its kind of bright but it makes you really easy to see against the snow.


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By fossana
From Boulder, CO
Jan 21, 2013
West Overhang

Ryan Williams wrote:
They do it to be different. When a company is very confident in a product, they try to make it in colors that no one else is using - the product will build a reputation faster that way because it is easily recognizable...

Not true. A fashion committee decides on a set of colors twice a year based on the Pantone palette: www.npr.org/2011/02/10/133636541/the-business-of-color-compa>>> The outdoor industry is not immune from this trend. As hideous as it is a lot of outdoor (and non-outdoor) clothing companies are using orange. Don't believe me, see: https://www.google.com/search?q=orange+jacket]]https://www.g>>>

Paul-B, the Ferrosi jackets are super thin. I returned it, wanting something a little more substantial, but that might be what you want. I do use their line of pants for summer climbing and they hold up well to abrasion. REI had them on clearance a few months ago.


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By Alan Nagel
Jan 21, 2013
On Cube Point, Tetons

Mostafa wrote:
I've been happy with my Marmot Rom Jacket. marmot.com/products/rom_jacket


+1 Love mine, and find sleeves a bit longer than older Patagonia guide.


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By Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Jan 22, 2013
Cleo's Needle

Paul-B wrote:
Thanks for the responses. Tried on that Marmot ROM jacket, it was nice, but I am trying to stay away from windstopper, as I don't think it will be quite as breathable as I want when I am actually climbing Wind Pro/air permeable softshell is more what I am looking for. I think I will wait and find that Ferrosi jacket in stock, try it on and decide between that and the Rab. That Ibex jacket looks nice, but at $350 dollars I could probably buy one of every other jacket I was considering. My pockets aren't that deep.


The ROM is very breathable. I had one and liked the materials. I'm tall and skinny so it fit me rather poorly which is why I no longer have it. The hood is also on the small side so don't expect and face coverage. If the ROM fits you it's a pretty nice jacket.

I have a Ferosi hoody, I have worn it a lot and it's a nice jacket for what it is, a very light weight soft shell. It is in the same league as Arcteryx Squamish or Patagonia Houdini but a little more durable. There is no bells and whistles and hood is pretty tight over a helmet.

I like Rab a lot because their patterns fit me well. I picked up a Sawtooth softshell and LOVE IT! sadly there isn't a hood. The things I like about it for rock climbing aside from its fit is that it is lightweight and durable, has elastic and velcro wrist closures, pockets above the waistline/harness, and a neck cinch. If I was dead set on a hooded version that was a little warmer I'd look at the Scimitar.


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By Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Jan 22, 2013
OTL

Marmot M3 material is way stretchy and breathable. First time I wore it through some flared/sqeeze/almost OW and looked brand new still afterwards. No wear showing so far.


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By T.J. Esposito
From San Diego, CA
Jan 22, 2013
Espresso @ New Jack City

Tom Mulholland wrote:
I really like the Offwidth jacket from Mountain Hardware. It's stretchy and the material seems rather abrasion resistant, although I haven't ever actually used it in an offwidth (usually get plenty warm just thrashing around). It's a great around town jacket too, for me, and has a nice athletic cut - I'm pretty skinny, but not tall (5'10"). It's a pretty light jacket - it probably wouldn't be enough for 45 degrees and under, unless you're constantly moving, but it works well for me as I usually warm up a ton with a little athletic activity.


I've got the MHW Android, which I think is basically a slight step up from the Offwidth (chest pocket, e.g.) I second the above observations; my second time wearing it was for chimney and offwidth thrashing and it has zero signs of wear, super durable and great for climbing in. The shorter cut is nice as you can cinch it above your gear loops without getting a big fabric muffin top. Had it for about a year now, still in great shape. I got mine from The Clymb for about $80.


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Jan 22, 2013
El Chorro

fossana wrote:
Not true. A fashion committee decides on a set of colors twice a year based on the Pantone palette: www.npr.org/2011/02/10/133636541/the-business-of-color-compa>>> The outdoor industry is not immune from this trend. As hideous as it is a lot of outdoor (and non-outdoor) clothing companies are using orange. Don't believe me, see: https://www.google.com/search?q=orange+jacket]]https://www.g>>> Paul-B, the Ferrosi jackets are super thin. I returned it, wanting something a little more substantial, but that might be what you want. I do use their line of pants for summer climbing and they hold up well to abrasion. REI had them on clearance a few months ago.


You are right in saying that colour forcasting goes on - and yes it does affect the outdoor brands as well. But every market is different, and every company approaches their respective markets in a different way.

For example, the most popular reason for an outdoor enthusiast to buy a brightly coloured jacket in the UK is because they think it is safer. They think that they will be seen more easily in the event of a search and rescue situation. Outside of that, I'd say (rough estimate) that 80% of all people buying jackets from outdoor brands here are looking for black or dark blue.

In many parts of east Asia though, the market is the opposite. They love bright colours and have no interest in buying blakcs, browns, blues. They want to stand out and be seen, in the mountains as well as in the city.

I have purchased over $1.5 million worth of product for my store to sell in 2013. I will probably purchase $1.7 million worth of products for 2014. I'd say 3-5% of that is based on display and merchandising alone - meaning that I know for a fact that I probably won't sell it for full price. I'm buying it to brighten up the store and to put together colour palettes. Another 10% of things I buy is strictly because I know that east Asians love shopping in London and they love bright clothing.

If it weren't for that 10 to 15 percent of clothing that I buy for the colours, my store would be all blacks, browns, blues, and beiges. That is the UK market. And there are plenty of other managers out there like myself that are doing the same thing. At the end of the day, the research and sales are what drive design for the overwhelming majority of brands, be it outdoor brands or fashion brands.

Sure there are a group of 10 people who get together twice a year, sit around in a white room and slice up vegetables to figure out what colours are going to be "in" next season, but those decisions affect a pretty small majority of what we all see and buy. If you're into Gucci, Prada, LV like my wife is, then you may have a reason to be interested in those 10 people in the white room. But if you are interested in OR, Rab and Westcombe Mountaineering like myself, then you don't care because they don't affect you.

What is really scary - The North Face and Patagonia probably take those 10 people in the white room a lot more seriously that we'd all like to think. They make a lot more money on the high street than they do in the mountains.


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By bearbreeder
Jan 22, 2013

when i was bumming around yos last year ... that gentlemen who always takes photos was hanging around camp4 ... people who did nose runs would come up to him and ask him if they took some photos of em

the first thing he asked was "what was your colours?" ... if it was grey, brown, black, etc ... you were SOL ... shiny colours got the standout photos

there have been several SARs around here where people have gotten lost, and they have been much harder to find according to the teams because they didnt wear bright colours ...

i like subdued colours myself ... but im starting to bling myself out for the aforementioned reasons ;)


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By Ryan Hill
From Cedar City, UT
Jan 22, 2013

BirminghamBen wrote:
I have worm my OR Ferrosi halfzip (no hood) almost every day since I got it for Christmas. Very abrasion and wind resistant, would satisfy your fit criteria. Not extremely warm, but definately adds more warmth than the thinner windshirts such as Marmot Ion or Trailwind. A bit less warmth than the DriClime, which is also a favorite piece. Like RAB, OR tends to keep it pushing, in my opinion. My new favorite all-conditions combination for upper body warmth is a synthetic tee, Patagonia R1, and OR Ferrosi. During winter, with R1 and softshell bottoms.


Another +1 for the Ferrosi Windshirt. I've had mine for almost two years and it goes just about everywhere with me. Treat it with DWR once a year and it resists light rain, shove it through an offwidth and it comes out looking new, flexible enough to use on my mountain bike, and breathable enough for a run in cooler weather. Protects against wind and wears well with a light fleece underneath. Throw a puffy over the top for cold belays. For the price I don't think I have seen anything I like half as much.


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By Allen Corneau
From Houston, TX
Jan 23, 2013

Marmot DriClime Windshirt!


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By Dave Bn
From Fort Collins, CO
Jan 23, 2013
Dreamweaver

Ray Pinpillage wrote:
The ROM is very breathable....Ferosi hoody...It is in the same league as Arcteryx Squamish or Patagonia Houdini but a little more durable.


I disagree with this.

The ROM is windstopper which is basically stretchy material with goretex laminate. It breathes as well (well poorly) as goretex does it just doesn't have taped seems.

The Ferrosi (which I am a huuuuuge fan of) is a true softshell (i.e. it blocks wind due to the tight nature of the weave) and is quite heavier than the ripstop nylon (poor breathability) Squamish and Houdini (i.e. 17 oz versus 6-7 oz).

The Ferrosi is and always will be my go to jacket for anything short of ice or Fall through Spring alpine climbing. Incredibly durable, blocks wind and breathes like a champ. It probably could handle winterish conditions with a heavy weight base layer underneath and carrying a UL wind shirt like the houdini.


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