Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
soft catch
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
Page 1 of 3.  1  2  3   Next>   Last>>
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
Nov 26, 2012
Summit of Mt. Langley
What is the technique that enables you to soft catch someone? Justin Tomlinson
From Monrovia, CA
Joined Apr 4, 2010
334 points
Nov 26, 2012
ukclimbing.com/articles/page.p... bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
1,876 points
Nov 26, 2012
me
My climbing partner's girlfriend that weighs 50 lbs less than me ccerling
From Boulder, CO
Joined Mar 29, 2010
56 points
Nov 26, 2012
"Euro-slack", Google it. Tradoholic
Joined Apr 17, 2004
12,440 points
Nov 26, 2012
It has a lot to do with the action you take when you feel the weight of the climber come onto the rope, not the amount of slack in the system. Having said that, the three most popular methods are stepping in, small jump, or remaining neutral. It will mostly depend on the weight difference between climber and belayer. The main goal is always keeping the climber from hitting the ground an/or any obstacles. PAS
Joined Jul 19, 2009
25 points
Nov 26, 2012
Mathematical!


That article gives a fair explanation. Remember, you don't need a lot of slack in the system to give a dynamic belay.
Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Joined Jul 11, 2008
123 points
Nov 26, 2012
Red Rock, Cannibal crag
i'm a little heavy and was taught to generally stay close to the wall and jump to soften the catch. So far partners - some much lighter - have been happy with the softness. The idea about standing away from the wall and moving quickly towards is seems a little more risky for the belayer than being below the first bolt.

but hey, opinions are like assholes.
OldManRiver
From Cottonwood Heights, UT
Joined Jul 18, 2012
75 points
Nov 27, 2012
OldManRiver wrote:
i'm a little heavy and was taught to generally stay close to the wall and jump to soften the catch. So far partners - some much lighter - have been happy with the softness. The idea about standing away from the wall and moving quickly towards is seems a little more risky for the belayer than being below the first bolt. but hey, opinions are like assholes.


on steep overhang starts, jumping up may not be the best option ... if you do, wear a helmet ;)

on trad, standing far away may not be the best option if a zipper is possible ...

use that thing between yr ears =P
bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
1,876 points
Nov 27, 2012
Cut! Sadly my flash attempt met with dismal pump-f...
Andrew Bisharat's book, Sport Climbing, has an excellent overview. Something that helps me time the jump is keeping a slight bow of slack out with my guide hand, and when I feel it go taut, jump.

A really great way to practice is to have a gym leading session where you are not allowed to clip the anchors, which forces you to take and catch lots of falls. Try experimenting (within reason) with slack, and various degrees of jump.

If there's enough rope drag (I mean A LOT), it might be necessary to give slack as the only way to provide "give" in the system.
Rajiv Ayyangar
From Portland, ME
Joined Jun 22, 2010
234 points
Nov 27, 2012
Use a lot of screamers. divnamite
From New York, NY
Joined Aug 1, 2007
228 points
Nov 27, 2012
Summit of Mt. Langley
cool, thanks everyone.

@ divnamite, isn't that called "no-catch"?
Justin Tomlinson
From Monrovia, CA
Joined Apr 4, 2010
334 points
Nov 27, 2012
Summit of Wolf's Head with Pingora in the backgrou...
Introducing extra slack in the rope before the fall is NOT the way to do it. This increases the force (for FF<1) instead of reducing it. csproul
From Davis, CA
Joined Dec 3, 2009
109 points
Nov 27, 2012
csproul wrote:
Introducing extra slack in the rope before the fall is NOT the way to do it. This increases the force (for FF<1) instead of reducing it.


Precisely. A longer unchecked fall is not a softer catch. It's what you do to decellerate the climber that softens the catch. I don't think I'd want to climb with anyone who doesn't know the difference.
Gunkiemike
Joined Jul 29, 2009
1,666 points
Nov 27, 2012
My cool Elly....
csproul wrote:
Introducing extra slack in the rope before the fall is NOT the way to do it. This increases the force (for FF<1) instead of reducing it.

Exactly! avoid slack but let some rope slip trough and brake softly!
Pitty
From Marbach
Joined Apr 27, 2011
68 points
Nov 27, 2012
My navigator keeps me from getting lost
a little hop when the rope goes tight will do it in almost all situations. Crag Dweller
From New York, NY
Joined Jul 17, 2006
274 points
Nov 27, 2012
Me and my Fetish I guess.. ;)
Crag Dweller wrote:
a little hop when the rope goes tight will do it in almost all situations.

+1
Adjust 'hop' based on body weight difference, amount of rope between climber & belayer and protection (bolt/gear/iffy gear).
Daryl Allan
From Sierra Vista, AZ
Joined Sep 13, 2006
1,158 points
Nov 27, 2012
if you're a fatty, step in. if they're a fatty, hang on. Leave enough slack off the end of your gri gri so when the climber makes a move they aren't short roped (usually for me this is enough that the gri gri sits just under parallel with the ground). frankstoneline
Joined Apr 23, 2009
22 points
Nov 27, 2012
So when I am hanging off of 2 tied off knife blades equalized with a Snarg and my partner is out of sight whining about the verglas (at least I think that is what those noises are) and it's getting dark and the snow is getting heavier and we're 6 pitches up with 2 to go - should I be hopping up and down constantly in the hopes of softening the inevitable (and with the added bonus of warding off hypothermia)?

Do you think context might occasionally come into play?
Eric Engberg
Joined Apr 28, 2009
2 points
Nov 27, 2012
Eric - strange post, dude. Climb on. Wally Wally
From Denver
Joined Apr 12, 2006
31 points
Nov 27, 2012
.
Eric Engberg wrote:
So when I am hanging off of 2 tied off knife blades equalized with a Snarg and my partner is out of sight whining about the verglas (at least I think that is what those noises are) and it's getting dark and the snow is getting heavier and we're 6 pitches up with 2 to go - should I be hopping up and down constantly in the hopes of softening the inevitable (and with the added bonus of warding off hypothermia)? Do you think context might occasionally come into play?


The real question is why are you still climbing with snargs?
Wade J.
From Boulder, CO
Joined Aug 11, 2011
26 points
Nov 27, 2012
Big Boulder, just a bit downhill from Temple of Ka...
""""use that thing between yr ears =P"""

Best advise yet seen on any web site.







Guy Keesee
From Moorpark, CA
Joined Mar 1, 2008
187 points
Nov 27, 2012
Wade J. wrote:
The real question is why are you still climbing with snargs?


Sometimes they actually are the best option.
Eric Engberg
Joined Apr 28, 2009
2 points
Nov 27, 2012
A hip belay will give pretty soft catch I bet. I personally haven't needed to do a lot of dialing in of my catching system. John Husky
Joined May 10, 2011
3 points
Nov 27, 2012
1. use a gri-gri 2. have alot of slack 3. when they fall run in opposite direction richie
From englewood, tn
Joined May 10, 2010
40 points
Nov 30, 2012
Out of the blue.  Photo by Mike W.
In order to make any impact reducing the peak load you would have to jump at the precise nano second before the peak load. This would be just as the rope is starting to stretch but before it has come completely taught. So you would have to be starring at the leader ready to react with ninja like reflexes and time the precise moment right before the peak load.

To put it in perspective, a free falling body falls 16 feet in one second. So a 16 foot fall from start to finish will only take slightly more than one second because of the deceleration time. If you blink your eyes for a fraction of a second you are too late

I believe rgold has done some testing and found little or no evidence jumping does anything to reduce peak loads. The best thing you could do is use ropes with low impact ratings, use atc's vs grigris, give with your body a little, or climb with skinny chicks.

Jump on!.

Jump on!
Greg D
From Here
Joined Apr 5, 2006
960 points
Nov 30, 2012
Hey Greg, have you ever tried it in real life? It's not that hard and it does make a difference, at least based upon my years of experience. michaeltarne
Joined Jan 2, 2011
114 points


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 3.  1  2  3   Next>   Last>>
Beyond the Guidebook:
The Definitive Climbing Resource
Inspiration & Motivation
to Fuel Your Run
Next Generation Mountain
Bike Trail Maps
Backcountry, Sidecountry
& Secret Stashes
Better Data. Better Tools.
Better Hikes!