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Slings- how in the world do you keep them from tangling???
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By Unassigned User
May 29, 2012

So I just did my first multi pitch trad lead this last weekend and I fought with the slings every inch of the way. I was more concerned starting out about my rack and how I would keep that in order, that was no big deal. I never once thought that slings would get to be a annoyance. Everytime I went for my long doubled slings they would be tangled up with another sling. And between pitches I would sort them out again and them they would tangle up. I carry them across my opposite shoulder as my rack and I keep the short ones on top, long ones on bottom. Any ideas as to what I am doing wrong? What do you guys do out there?


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By mugsy
May 29, 2012

Why don't you keep all that crap on your harness instead of slung around your neck?
Seems safer and easier to manage - cams on front loops, slings on rear loops. Never had to deal with tangled slings...


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By S.Stelli
From Colorado Springs, CO
May 29, 2012

I put the majority of my slings on my harness, usually the longer slings towards the back, so I know if I'm getting a double or triple length.

I also like to sling two or three over my shoulder just in case its easier to remove that than grab my my harness for some reason or another.

Practice makes it a lot easier. And practice this stuff when you aren't on lead! It helps! It helped me when I first started to trad lead...

Also there are various methods for doubling over the slings - I'll let others chime in on those methods...


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By Aerili
From Salt Lake City, UT
May 29, 2012
Get down from there! <br /> <br />May 2013 <br />Photo by Duc

I usually clip double length runners to my harness in the form of compact alpine draws (toward the back, as others stated).

When slinging runners over the shoulder, I always put them on one at a time. It greatly reduces tangling.

Occasionally I put a single sling over my shoulder and clip all the rest of my alpine draws to it (vs on my harness). Works well too.


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By Drake Pregnall
From Morehead, KY
May 29, 2012
Leading up Eat Yourself A Pie 5.8+ at Barkeater in the Adirondacks

Going with alpine draws is a real easy way to rack slings. Simply double or triple a sling between two carabiners and rack them on your harness as you would a quickdraw. I assume that's what you're using to clip your sling to the rope. With the alpine draw method, you just clip one end straight to the sling on the piece of gear, then clip the other end to your rope after you extend it to your liking. The carabiner the piece of gear was racked on will just be dangling off the sling on the gear. I usually do keep a few slings around my neck and under an arm though. Just in case.


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By beccs
May 29, 2012

If you want to carry double length runners over the shoulder the best way it to toss it over your shoulder and connect with a biner. You can keep them racked like this under everything else you're carrying around your shoulders (other runners, gear sling) because you can just unclip the biner and pull them out from everything.

I don't like carrying these slings over my shoulder though unless I'm seconding a pitch (easier to throw over your shoulder when you're in the middle of a climb). What I typically do is fold in half, have clipped to a biner, then take the other side and start twisting. When the twists are getting tight clip that end into the biner too and it all coils up into a nice neat package.


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By Unassigned User
May 29, 2012

Thanks for the input. I like the alpine draw style sounds easier and it means I have a biner on the sling already, handy. Practice is what I am going to be doing a lot of, that is why my rack did not give me problems is that I had practiced that a lot, I just never thought that slings would pose a problem.

Thanks y'all.


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By Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
May 29, 2012
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Peak.

I also don't like long slings over the shoulder, but for following I will do that just to keep up the pace.


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By Wannabe
May 29, 2012

Your questions leads me to a question: How many pitches have you seconded? I would normally think of this issue as something you would have seen multiple leaders handle and therefore kinda have sorted out. Reracking at the top of the pitch would have given you a chance to see how they're racking them. I'm kinda confused... Maybe I don't understand your difficulty exactly or your question maybe??


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By Marc H
From Lafayette, CO
May 29, 2012
The Cathedral Spires in RMNP, left to right: Stiletto, Sharkstooth, Forbidden Tower, Petit Grepon, The Saber, The Foil, The Moon & The Jackknife.

With four-foot-long slings, I double them over. Then I clip a single 'biner on it. Now hold the 'biner still and twist the sling with one finger about 12-15 times. You should now have a snug loop where the 'biner and your finger are. Clip the loop on your finger with the 'biner and you're done.

Twisted four footer
Twisted four footer


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By kevin deweese
From walnut creek, ca
May 29, 2012
don't throw rocks

I've found that twist-racking my slings is the best way to keep them separated and out of the way. With spectra, you can normally rack 3-4 48" slings on one large locking biner and 4-5 12" slings on a nonlocking biner. (If you know you're going to use one in a cruxy section, take one off the biner and loop a single sling around the head for ease of one-handed placement.)


"One way to rack your cordelette is to fold it in half, then half again, and half once more, or until it's down to a manageable size, then twist it up, as in the steps below:





Step 1: Fold in half, again and again until it's small enough. Don't let go of the tails. Steps 2 & 3: Twist the remaining material a few times until it presents as small a profile as possible. Steps 4 & 5: Clip to a large carabiner and it's ready to go on your rack.

www.chockstone.org/TechTips/Cordelette.htm#Rack Instructions
edit: Ninja'd by Mark.


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By Craig Childre
From Lubbock, Texas
May 29, 2012
Potrero Mexico, Sport Climbing Mecca.

Why I love using alpine triples... (How does anyone safely double????...never mind. edited after Marc H posted). Using only one hand, I can pull the sling from my harness, clip into the gear/bolt, and most importantly... extend the sling... again, using one hand. This comes up often when I have to keep one arm jammed in the crack while placing pro. If you carry slings over your shoulder, you'll find attaching that sling to a desperate placement is a challenge, especially if you have to match hands to be able to lift the sling over your head and shoulder.

I agree with most here... my trend is to rack most pro on a shoulder sling (easy to pass off to your partner), nuts and slings go down on the harness. This facilitates faster belay changes. As a 2nd, you clean gear onto you're harness, as I hate rope drag, I usually deploy most of the slings. Then at the belay change, you take the depleted rack from your partner, and reorganize it for your next pitch, while your partner move's the remaining slings and nuts, as you're move the cams back onto your shoulder sling. Just my 2 cents....


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By Unassigned User
May 29, 2012

Wannabe wrote:
Your questions leads me to a question: How many pitches have you seconded? I would normally think of this issue as something you would have seen multiple leaders handle and therefore kinda have sorted out. Reracking at the top of the pitch would have given you a chance to see how they're racking them. I'm kinda confused... Maybe I don't understand your difficulty exactly or your question maybe??



Seconded??? Who does that? Lead all the climbs!!! No I am kidding, I had a guy that I followed for about 1 and a half years. Climbed a lot of different stuff. Everything I learned I learned from him. Now I am learning for myself that some of the things he did don't work for me, or I was not paying enough attention and so I am doing it wrong.


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By Wannabe
May 29, 2012

JonathanHillis wrote:
Seconded??? Who does that? Lead all the climbs!!! No I am kidding, I had a guy that I followed for about 1 and a half years. Climbed a lot of different stuff. Everything I learned I learned from him. Now I am learning for myself that some of the things he did don't work for me, or I was not paying enough attention and so I am doing it wrong.


Fair enough. Maybe I just "get around" more or aren't as choosey about who's rope I'm riding on. I definitely saw better and worse ways to do this and am still sorting out what I prefer myself. For a minute I thought you might be a ... TROLL ;-)


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By Zappatista
May 29, 2012
Book me, officer.

JH, carry no more than 5 over your shoulder, you'll be fine. Mixing it up between some trad draws (tripled 24" sewn runners+2 biners) and a few sport draws should help keep clusterfucking to a minimum. Also check out Metolius Rabbit Runners, they're the shit, you should buy a couple and be amazed at how much you can do with them.

End helpfulness, back to satire.

NEW-BY!


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By Unassigned User
May 30, 2012

Killis I actually own two of the rabbit runners. They got left in the gear bin for some reason. And yes I agree they are amazing it was not by choice that they were left behind, more forgetfulness.


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By kevin deweese
From walnut creek, ca
May 30, 2012
don't throw rocks

I use Yates rabbit runners. Amazing and the only "cordalette" anchor point I bring with me if I'm not going to be building an anchor out of rope.


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By Brian
From North Kingstown, RI
May 30, 2012

+1 Alpine draws


Alpine draw
Alpine draw


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