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Nov 19, 2012
infinitylist.com/video/high-li...


Hey guys, this is an awesome video about highlining that was filmed, edited, and produced by The Good Line Productions, in collaboration with Josh Beaudoin and myself from Gibbon Slacklines. It was shot in Rock Canyon near Provo, UT. Let me know if you have any questions or comments about highlining or slacklining in general!
Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Nov 19, 2012
super cool video, thanks for sharing. makes me want to go walk a highline! Hardhat n Hexes
From Flagstaff, AZ.
Joined Sep 25, 2011
19 points
Administrator
Nov 22, 2012
infinitylist.com/video/high-li...
>
Although I tend to steer away from anything sponsored by Gibbon Nooblines, I must say it was an interesting video, good work.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Nov 23, 2012
why do you steer away from gibbon lines? their highline and longline gear is really good, and their tricklining gear is not that bad either. The ratchets are, of course, not ideal but provide a super easy, super cheap way to get lines REALLY tight. Gibbon, overall, is a pretty cool company in my opinion. Just trying to spread the stoke of slack :) Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Nov 23, 2012
OTL
Mickey Wilson wrote:
why do you steer away from gibbon lines? their highline and longline gear is really good, and their tricklining gear is not that bad either. The ratchets are, of course, not ideal but provide a super easy, super cheap way to get lines REALLY tight. Gibbon, overall, is a pretty cool company in my opinion. Just trying to spread the stoke of slack :)


Hey, question on the Gibbon ratchets - I bought my nephew a Funline setup for his bday - its only 12m, so if we need a longer line, could we use 1" webbing with the same ratchet for longer setups and when progressing from the starter 2" line? And how hard can I crank on that ratchet for tension, safely? Are they pretty durable? thanks
Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Joined Oct 20, 2010
345 points
Nov 25, 2012
Hey Matt,

I have seen people use the 2" ratchets with 1" but I have never done so myself, but I'd imagine it would be fine so long as you make sure the webbing wraps nicely. Just use common sense when using the ratchets. Crank on them until the webbing wrap becomes too big for the ratchet. I'd say you can trust your ratchets on lines up to 120' or so.
Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Nov 26, 2012
OTL
Cool - thanks for the info. Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Joined Oct 20, 2010
345 points
Nov 26, 2012
when you start to go longer, you really just need pulleys and rope Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Administrator
Dec 1, 2012
Mickey Wilson wrote:
why do you steer away from gibbon lines? their highline and longline gear is really good, and their tricklining gear is not that bad either. The ratchets are, of course, not ideal but provide a super easy, super cheap way to get lines REALLY tight. Gibbon, overall, is a pretty cool company in my opinion. Just trying to spread the stoke of slack :)

Well, I am not a trickliner, I am more into longlining and highlining, so I cannot comment on their tricklines for that application. However, they come across as a cheap, "just get it set up quick" type company. Of course that opinion is heavily based by their implementation of ratchets that are not designed for the application they being used in. Ratchets are garbage for any serious slackline application (outside tricklining) as they can and often do fail. I have never heard of some breaking a legit longline system with proper components.

But I suppose my opinion is ultimately based upon the fact that they heavily tailor to the newbie crowed. If you look at any noob learning to slackline, it is likely they are walking a Gibbon line. If you search "highline failure" on YouTube, most of the lines involved are Gibbons. By contrast, I dont know a single longliner who uses Gibbon lines. I know some use the Proline and Flowline, but honestly, for longlining, their webbing is pretty fair compared to what is available.

Gibbon's widespread appearance in the beginner crowed has labeled them as the Wal-Mart of slacklining, which is why I believe that most serious longliners and highliners do not take Gibbon as a serious and legit company. The most popular advanced grade slackline equipment manufacturer in the USA is likely Balance Community.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Dec 1, 2012
the man was smart
trends are funny to me for some reason T Roper
From VA,NM,UT,CT,MA
Joined Mar 31, 2006
1,055 points
Sep 10, 2013
I am new to the slackline community and have a gibbon red classic line and want to set up a 20 foot high line. I'll be wearing a harness obviously, but is there any other safety precautions I should take? should i look into different types of slacklines for highline walking or will a gibbon classic do the trick? thanks. forlin13
Joined Sep 10, 2013
0 points
Sep 10, 2013
^^^ PS. ill be seting my line up from two trees ^^^ forlin13
Joined Sep 10, 2013
0 points
Sep 10, 2013
Mt. Agassiz
You can back it up with a rope...Or use two lines on top of each other, like in the top video. You want some kind of redundancy. Ryan Nevius
From The Range of Light
Joined Dec 29, 2010
781 points
Sep 10, 2013
The Phoenix
TR purist wrote:
trends are funny to me for some reason


ur a trend...
The Phoenix
Joined Apr 23, 2013
114 points
Sep 10, 2013
In the traverse section, double rainbow in the bac...
forlin13 wrote:
I am new to the slackline community and have a gibbon red classic line and want to set up a 20 foot high line. I'll be wearing a harness obviously, but is there any other safety precautions I should take? should i look into different types of slacklines for highline walking or will a gibbon classic do the trick? thanks.

Absolutely do not rig any sort of highline with a ratchet. Ratchets can and do fail in this application.
Alex McIntyre
From Tucson, AZ
Joined Jan 14, 2011
377 points
Sep 10, 2013
Alex McIntyre wrote:
Absolutely do not rig any sort of highline with a ratchet. Ratchets can and do fail in this application.


What do you recommend to do? Pulley systems work best im guessing? Should I have a back up line rigged as well?
forlin13
Joined Sep 10, 2013
0 points
Sep 10, 2013
Mt. Agassiz
forlin13 wrote:
What do you recommend to do? Pulley systems work best im guessing? Should I have a back up line rigged as well?


You should go with someone who understands redundancy, gear limitations, and failure modes of a system.
Ryan Nevius
From The Range of Light
Joined Dec 29, 2010
781 points
Sep 13, 2013
forlin13 wrote:
What do you recommend to do? Pulley systems work best im guessing? Should I have a back up line rigged as well?


Hey forlin13, trying to set up a line higher than your head with ratchets is kind of frowned upon/not a good idea. So if you are looking at a 20 foot highline, you really can't use ratchets, even if it's a short line. It's possible they can release suddenly when a person falls off the line and their leash catches them, sending a shock to the system. There are a lot of rules to the highline. It even says that in the video at the top of the thread. Josh says it pretty clearly, "The highline has a simple set of rules that you need to follow" It's hard to know what all these rules are the first time you experience highlining but as you go more and more (with experienced people who are willing to teach you) you begin to learn the ropes as it were.

So in summary, please don't go and try to set up a highline with a ratchet because you don't want to take the risk it could break or release, and for that matter, please don't go and try to set up a highline at all before learning how it's done and what gear is appropriate.
Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Sep 13, 2013
20 kN wrote:
Well, I am not a trickliner, I am more into longlining and highlining, so I cannot comment on their tricklines for that application. However, they come across as a cheap, "just get it set up quick" type company. Of course that opinion is heavily based by their implementation of ratchets that are not designed for the application they being used in. Ratchets are garbage for any serious slackline application (outside tricklining) as they can and often do fail. I have never heard of some breaking a legit longline system with proper components. But I suppose my opinion is ultimately based upon the fact that they heavily tailor to the newbie crowed. If you look at any noob learning to slackline, it is likely they are walking a Gibbon line. If you search "highline failure" on YouTube, most of the lines involved are Gibbons. By contrast, I dont know a single longliner who uses Gibbon lines. I know some use the Proline and Flowline, but honestly, for longlining, their webbing is pretty fair compared to what is available. Gibbon's widespread appearance in the beginner crowed has labeled them as the Wal-Mart of slacklining, which is why I believe that most serious longliners and highliners do not take Gibbon as a serious and legit company. The most popular advanced grade slackline equipment manufacturer in the USA is likely Balance Community.


And 20 kN, I have to say, I just went back and read the old posts of this thread, and I think you should be more careful with throwing around words like Noob and Newbie because some of the best slackliners in the world ride for Gibbon. Flowline is great for longlines and highlines. The longest highline in Colorado is rigged with doubled flowline on a regular basis. It is also the webbing used in this video even.

The reason the most highline failures are associated with Gibbon ratchets is because Gibbon is by far the biggest slackline company in the world, and also probably holds the record for most converted slackers. It's only natural that the most incidents would be more heavily associated with the biggest company. Gibbon promotes all kinds of slacklining and if you took a second to look around, you'd see the weblocks and linegrips they have which work as good as any gear out there, especially for highlines. Don't be so elitist just because it feels good to jump on the "let's hate on the big company" bandwagon. Gibbon is good for slacklining. elitist dudes like you maybe aren't

and p.s. i see plenty of "noobs" learning on 1" primitive lines as well as gibbon lines and they all seem to be having fun, which is what matters anyways.
Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Oct 2, 2013
Hey, if anybody is going to do this highline and would be willing to teach somebody, I would love to learn! I have been trying to get into highlining, but I currently lack the funds and want to go with someone who knows what they are doing first. I have experience rock climbing and have read about many ways to set up a highline. Let me know, thanks! Kimball Hill
Joined Oct 2, 2013
0 points
Sep 29, 2014
So yet again another beginner here. I have been trying to get into highlineing for some time now and just have not known how to start due to lack of funds and knowledge. I was hoping someone in the area may want to team up and set up a line with me and show me how it is done all nice and proper like. I have plenty of experience slacklineing and rock climbing. I hope to hear from some of you guys! Josh Rovder
From Morrison, CO
Joined Sep 7, 2014
0 points
Sep 30, 2014
Hey Josh,

cool that you wanna get into it! first step, learn to spell it. HIGHLINING ;) haha just kidding.

first step is to get into longlining. buy some pulleys, static rope, a brake like a grigri or a petzl RIG or an Eddy, then buy some shackles, 1/2" and 5/8" should be a good starter size, and get some steel rings (1.5" ID or 2" ID) for your line lockers. also of course you will need longline webbing, polyester is ideal.

once you get the hang of longlining and how all that works, you need to find a person or crew of people who are active highliners and go with them to highliners and learn how to properly rig and secure a highline! don't ever try to go by yourself or figure it out on your own. Most people go to 10 or 20 highlines with others before they ever attempt to do one on their own without guidance. Where are you located? Have you tried searching Facebook for pages dedicated to highlining or slacklining in your particular area????
Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Sep 30, 2014
oh, for your longline rig, you will also want to buy some spansets (polyester slings with burly sheaths) or make some padded rope by threading rope through webbing. Either of these methods should give you some burly anchors for trees :) Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Oct 1, 2014
IDK
Hi guys I'm wanting to get into highlining. Is it cool if I just tie the straps around the trees? mustardtiger
Joined Oct 25, 2011
36 points
Oct 1, 2014
mustard tiger. i hope you are kinda trolling cuz getting into highlining isn't something to be taken lightly or joked about. read the past comments! you should go with experienced highliners before trying to rig highlines yourself. yes, you can use strong trees for highlining but there is way more to it than that. check facebook to meet highliners to take you out Mickey Wilson
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Jul 24, 2012
0 points
Oct 1, 2014
Hookin it
Mickey Wilson wrote:
mustard tiger. i hope you are kinda trolling cuz getting into highlining isn't something to be taken lightly or joked about. read the past comments! you should go with experienced highliners before trying to rig highlines yourself. yes, you can use strong trees for highlining but there is way more to it than that. check facebook to meet highliners to take you out



speaking of facebook, mickey do you belong the facebook group "happy valley highliners"?
Leif E
Joined Jul 9, 2013
283 points


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