Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
self-rescue
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
Oct 16, 2012
Photo.
Do you take additional (on top of your standard/minimum) gear for or with self rescue in mind? If so what?

Ever have to use self rescue techniques (tie off belay, raise/lower, tandem rapp, rope solo to injured leader, etc) in a legit self rescue situation? (not 3:1 your second because they couldn't make it on their own)

If you are familiar with self rescue (aka self-reliant) specific techniques what do you know (tie off belay, counter-balance rapp, etc)? Where'd you learn? Are you going to learn more? Do you practice?

These are simple open questions purposely. I want to know what do my peers know, do, seek and like.

Thanks all.
norwegianwanderer
Joined Jun 22, 2012
30 points
Oct 16, 2012
Cold day at Smug's
norwegianwanderer wrote:
Do you take additional (on top of your standard/minimum) gear for or with self rescue in mind? If so what?

No, I don't take anything extra. I should be able to do the trick with things that I normally use on my rack for climbing.

norwegianwanderer wrote:
Ever have to use self rescue techniques (tie off belay, raise/lower, tandem rapp, rope solo to injured leader, etc) in a legit self rescue situation? (not 3:1 your second because they couldn't make it on their own)

In more than 15 years of climbing, I have never had to use any specific self rescue techniques other than lowering an injured climber to the ground and helping them walk out to the trail-head with a broken ankle.

norwegianwanderer wrote:
If you are familiar with self rescue (aka self-reliant) specific techniques what do you know (tie off belay, counter-balance rapp, etc)? Where'd you learn? Are you going to learn more? Do you practice? These are simple open questions purposely. I want to know what do my peers know, do, seek and like. Thanks all.

I'm probably like most climbers. I have taken self rescue classes and crevasse rescue classes. I have learned most of the techniques that would be useful. And like most climbers, I don't practice these techniques often enough. I tell myself that I'll do it every season and I'm lucky if it happens once every 3 years or so. I think that one of the best things I have done to (re)-learn many rescue techniques has been to take up aid climbing and especially solo-aid climbing. Lots of rigging for raising and lowering involved there.
csproul
From Davis, CA
Joined Dec 3, 2009
214 points
Oct 16, 2012
Chillin' at City of Rocks
Knowing how to escape the belay, doing 3:1 or other assist, and jugging a line are all skills that should be known and which require no extra gear.
Never had to use it though.
Princess Mia
From Vail
Joined May 22, 2006
422 points
Oct 16, 2012
First summit of First Flatiron
The only "extra" gear I take is a knife and 2 extra prussiks on the leg loops of my harness (I carry one other that gets used for almost all raps).

I practice regularly and have only had to do a free-hanging pickoff of a stranded partner who had missed the anchor and couldn't ascend.
Derek W
Joined Jun 27, 2008
38 points
Oct 16, 2012
The only thing extra I bring are two prusik loops.
Yes, you can do everything with tied slings, but having the proper diameter loops is easier. Plus you don't have to worry about being in a situation where you've given all the gear to your partner.

I think one of the most useful self rescue skills to have is being able to ascend a fixed rope.
You can free stuck rap lines or ascend a section you are unable to do by normal means (or because you or your partner are injured). I've had all these things happen.

I've also made a rope stretcher to carry an injured partner out. This required at least 4 people to carry him though.
andrewc
Joined Jul 31, 2008
0 points
Oct 16, 2012
High Exposure
Never had to escape the belay in 35 years. Never had to ascend to a fallen leader. I do practice some self rescue things at the beginning of the season

I always carry two short 6mm cord slings. One doubles as a leash for my nut tool. The other is tripled with 2 biners and on my harness. Either can be for Prusik or rappel autoblock. The one with two 'biners sometimes gets used as a draw...

Chalk bag is tied on with a 6mm x 48" DFK loop of cord using a sheet bend around my waist. This can be used to extend the rappel device (doubled), make a leash, a long Prusik, load releasable knot or rap tat. 18-20' of 6mm cord should get you the two short loops and one long loop.

Usually have a knife with me or at least a single edge razor blade taped inside my helmet for cutting rap tat. If climbing sans pack, I always have a small LED light clipped to my chalk bag.

If I'm not leading, the stuff listed above, along with a couple of nylon slings and 'biners, are all I've ever needed.
wivanoff
Joined Mar 3, 2012
121 points
Oct 16, 2012
Toofast
Here is a list of items you may use in a self rescue. As many have said here you might carry these items already:

Cordalettes
Prusik cords (I like 5mm)
Double length sling
Single length slings
Carabiners - assorted non lockers and lockers
Knife
Space blanket
Lighter
Climbing tape

Some have suggested above that a good practice is avoiding getting into a situation that might require a rescue. Good advice.
Geir
From Tucson, AZ
Joined Jun 7, 2006
3,344 points
Oct 16, 2012
City of Rocks
I've heard multiple people talk about carrying their extra cord on their leg loops, would you mind telling us how you attach them? Are they just tied on with no biner?

So far, I've been carrying one or two loops of cord on a locking biner, stowed on a gear loop. Just curious what others are doing...
Hiro
From Colorado
Joined Apr 2, 2012
421 points
Oct 16, 2012
Chillin' at City of Rocks
Just rap the tied prusic around the webbing going from your swami to one leg loop. Start with the knot end and then just loop the remainder over the knot when finished. Very neat and it doesn't take up room on your harness. Princess Mia
From Vail
Joined May 22, 2006
422 points
Oct 16, 2012
learn the kleimheist and just use the sling you normally carry ... it aint that hard ;) bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
2,022 points
Oct 16, 2012
Toofast
Hiro wrote:
I've heard multiple people talk about carrying their extra cord on their leg loops, would you mind telling us how you attach them? Are they just tied on with no biner? So far, I've been carrying one or two loops of cord on a locking biner, stowed on a gear loop. Just curious what others are doing...


My way of doing this is not typical. I prefer to tie my prusik cord the same length as a sling and wear them over my shoulder.
Geir
From Tucson, AZ
Joined Jun 7, 2006
3,344 points
Oct 16, 2012
The only "extra" gear I carry is a small locker holding: a 12" Prusik (6mm), a Tibloc, and a small serrated knife.

Never had to use the Prusik, used the Tibloc twice, use the knife occasionally for cutting tat.

As to self-rescue skills; belay escape (top or bottom), 2:1/3:1 systems, tandem/counterbalanced rappelling, and probably a few other things I can't think of right now.
Allen Corneau
From Houston, TX
Joined May 6, 2008
91 points
Administrator
Oct 16, 2012
Llama Races- Fairplay, Colorado
I carry 600' of staticline with me everywhere, and a whole pack full of toys to go with it. But extra gear to carry as you climb in the case you need to self rescue yourself, as said above, I should be able to make do with what's already on my rack.
Royal Gorge, CO
Royal Gorge, CO
Hank Caylor
From Golden, CO
Joined Dec 9, 2003
594 points
Oct 16, 2012
First summit of First Flatiron
Hiro wrote:
I've heard multiple people talk about carrying their extra cord on their leg loops, would you mind telling us how you attach them? Are they just tied on with no biner? So far, I've been carrying one or two loops of cord on a locking biner, stowed on a gear loop. Just curious what others are doing...

Hard to explain, but between my actual leg loops and my belay loop I just hold the knot and start to wrap tight around the harness. When done I put a few twists in the loop and loop it over the double sheet bend. Never had them fall off, never know they are there but I always have them (used them once).
Derek W
Joined Jun 27, 2008
38 points
Oct 16, 2012
When I was a bum at Frey
Counterbalance rap, tandem rap, escape belay, ascend, lower off guide, haul stuff etc.

Was climbing at night. Walked over to Rapp station with lady friend, loaded (think it was a double rope rappel w 2 60m) rappel. Had my (new) climber start to load when I saw we were on top of an angry copper head.

Hey Megan. I'm going to tie you to me and we're going to go down now.

Her response: snaaaake!!!!

Grabbed a sling I keep girth hitched around hard points of any new climber and did a tandem rap. We were laughing all the way down...
Medic741
From Pittsford, New York
Joined Apr 1, 2012
80 points
Oct 23, 2012
Derek W wrote:
Hard to explain, but between my actual leg loops and my belay loop I just hold the knot and start to wrap tight around the harness. When done I put a few twists in the loop and loop it over the double sheet bend. Never had them fall off, never know they are there but I always have them (used them once).


Your prussik is tied together with a double sheet bend?
kilonot
Joined Jan 25, 2012
1 points
Administrator
Oct 23, 2012
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
Where I go has a lot to do with what I bring. More remote areas require a few more "tools" to manage a situation if the shit hits the fan. Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Joined Jul 30, 2011
1,009 points
Nov 12, 2012
CoR
A double length dyneema sling over my shoulder (so I don't accidentally use and always have it with me). Works great for a releasable knot when escaping the belay and since its double length is the first piece in building your 3-1 or 5-1 mechanical advantage. I also carry a caribeener on a back loop with three prusiks, a tibloc, and a tiny knife. It's all worthless though if you don't practice self rescue with it. Self rescue techniques can be difficult made much more so by the pressure of the situation. rging
From Salt Lake City, Ut
Joined Jul 18, 2011
181 points
Feb 15, 2014
I now tend to think that each second needs to always have:

120 cm sling on carabiner.
60cm sling (also used as a cleaning sling)
short prusik (chalk bag cord)
long prusik
three lockers and a belay plate
two spare carabiners of some kind.

This is more than I once would have thought, as I always went with a light-is-right approach, however, most self-rescue situations need the above list.
David Coley
From UK
Joined Oct 26, 2013
50 points
Feb 15, 2014
David Coley wrote:
I now tend to think that each second needs to always have: 120 cm sling on carabiner. 60cm sling (also used as a cleaning sling) short prusik (chalk bag cord) long prusik three lockers and a belay plate two spare carabiners of some kind. This is more than I once would have thought, as I always went with a light-is-right approach, however, most self-rescue situations need the above list.


Sounds like an awful lot of useless crap to lug around.
DannyUncanny
From Vancouver
Joined Aug 27, 2010
78 points
Feb 15, 2014
DannyUncanny wrote:
Sounds like an awful lot of useless crap to lug around.

Really?
Which bits?
The second would always have a belay plate and a locker or two, and a chalk bag cord.

So that leaves a prusik, two 6 mm slings, and a carabiner or two. Doesn't sound like a lot.

I'm also not sure i could escape the system from a non powerpoint trad belay with much less, let alone rescue the leader. How would you do it?
David Coley
From UK
Joined Oct 26, 2013
50 points
Feb 15, 2014
There is never a situation where you NEED to have lockers. They just provide extra safety. Carrying extra gear for extra safety in an SOL situation is kind of like lugging around a SAM splint and an emergency bivy sack. Some people do that, but I prefer to bring the gear I will use to climb, and figure out how to handle problems with the gear I have on me.

I would typically go for 3 lockers split between 2 climbers. Two HMS for belaying and one extra for setting up guide mode. The leader always takes the extra locker for the top belay.

It makes transitions a lot faster because there is no clipping in to the anchor ever. The second comes up on the guide device, hands over their belay device, grabs any extra gear, and then take the guide mode belay device, and the two biners up with them when they leave.

I also don't carry chalk much unless it's sunny micro crimps or slick finger cracks.

As for the slings and carabiners, I've usually got a single wiregate with two prussiks on the back of my harness.
DannyUncanny
From Vancouver
Joined Aug 27, 2010
78 points
Feb 15, 2014
DannyUncanny wrote:
There is never a situation where you NEED to have lockers. They just provide extra safety. Carrying extra gear for extra safety in an SOL situation is kind of like lugging around a SAM splint and an emergency bivy sack. Some people do that, but I prefer to bring the gear I will use to climb, and figure out how to handle problems with the gear I have on me. I would typically go for 3 lockers split between 2 climbers. Two HMS for belaying and one extra for setting up guide mode. The leader always takes the extra locker for the top belay. It makes transitions a lot faster because there is no clipping in to the anchor ever. The second comes up on the guide device, hands over their belay device, grabs any extra gear, and then take the guide mode belay device, and the two biners up with them when they leave. I also don't carry chalk much unless it's sunny micro crimps or slick finger cracks. As for the slings and carabiners, I've usually got a single wiregate with two prussiks on the back of my harness.


That sounds almost the same gear as I was suggesting. Except for two slings and one locker. Hardly a pile of extra useless crap.
David Coley
From UK
Joined Oct 26, 2013
50 points
Feb 23, 2014
Top of Intersection Rock, Joshua Tree NP.
on one locking biner i have a petzl micro trax and 2 sterling hollow blocks which can be used for a prussik or kleimheist (i prefer kleimheist). this is always on the back of my harness and takes up very little space/weight.

gearexpress.com/catalog/produc...

i also always carry my gri gri 2, it's a very versatile self rescue tool. you can use to ascend a rope, rappel, escape the belay, and tie off a fallen climber. i also use it lead belaying so it's a piece of gear i always have on me.
david doucette
Joined Nov 29, 2012
30 points


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.  
Beyond the Guidebook:
The Definitive Climbing Resource
Inspiration & Motivation
to Fuel Your Run
Next Generation Mountain
Bike Trail Maps
Backcountry, Sidecountry
& Secret Stashes
Better Data. Better Tools.
Better Hikes!