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Second pair of climbing shoes?
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Jul 2, 2013
Rock Climbing Photo: Dragons Arete, Prison Camp, Mount Lemon
I've been climbing for about 3 months and I'm headed in the right direction (or at least I think) for gear. But I'm looking for a little bit more of an aggressive shoe and I can't seem to find the right pair. I got some 5.10 Coyotes to start out, but on the recent problems and climbs I've been working on, they've just been slipping a lot. I think this is because the toe and arch is more upturned than it is down. I'm thinking the 5.10 Anasazi Moccasyms. I've seen climbers around my gym fly up v8s in these and I'm just starting to climb v4s, but I don't want to buy them without a second opinion. All I know is I love overhangs and roofs on sport climbs and boulders, alike. Any suggestions as to what my second pair of climbing shoes should be? Dominic Amend
Joined Jun 24, 2013
41 points
Jul 2, 2013
Anasazi's are more of a technical climbing shoe, think slabs and flat wall. I personally don't think they're even good at that but I am biased toward liking softer shoes rather than stiff.

If overhangs are really your thing that I would go with something else. Which brand you choose will depend on what type of foot you have. Narrow with a low volume heel? Go with either the "Solution" the "Team" or the "Dragons". Wider foot? I would consider the "Shamans", also the "Miura's" have a wider heel than most La Sportiva shoes.

If you're like me and prefer sensitive shoes I would suggest "futura's", the black "Team", "Speedster's", the "Testarosa's", Or you could wait till August for the new 5.10 VXI Team
josh villeneuve
From Enfield, CT
Joined Oct 4, 2010
205 points
Jul 2, 2013
Not criticism, just my thoughts: If the rubber is good and you slip off footholds, its not the shoe's fault.
Unless you're cranking legendary hard routes (but you aren't as we're in beginners :p ), a "normal" fit is what you're after. The anasazi fits the description "normal" but its on the harder side of it.
My second pair were 5.10 hornets. I didn't climb harder because of them and climbing was less fun cause I experienced more discomfort (wich in fact made me climb worse due to the nuisance).
Joined Dec 22, 2012
0 points
Jul 2, 2013
Rock Climbing Photo: Upper pitches on Crescent Tower, Bugaboos.
Miura's are a great all around shoe. They work great for "techy" slab climbs as well. Jonathan Dull
From Boone, NC
Joined Mar 2, 2012
429 points
Jul 2, 2013
Dominic Amend wrote:
Any suggestions as to what my second pair of climbing shoes should be?

More practice on your footwork.

3 months in newer gear/ shoes is not going to make a difference.

But if you do want a do all shoe, I like Anasazi VCS's.
From San Francisco
Joined Oct 6, 2011
116 points
Jul 2, 2013
Rock Climbing Photo: Split shin after 5.9+ R lead
I got mocc's for my second shoe. Size them down until they hurt a bit, in 15 pitches they'll be perfect. Everyone is envious of the slipper style, so comfy and convenient. I've done a decent amount of slab climbing they are great for smearing. Real sensitive and soft, you can feel crystals with your toes.

But like someone else said, dial your foot technique before your blame the shoes. And don't compare what someone has climbed before in whatever shoe, it's not relevant. It is the Indian not the arrow.
Joined Apr 10, 2013
17 points
Jul 2, 2013
Rock Climbing Photo: Traverse by HWY 41 Cave
Have to echo what everyone else is saying, its not the shoes. I've seen guys crank pretty damn hard in flip flops and vans. Shoes are different for different feet, but if your foot fits the LS Miuras, they are an excellent shoe for all sorts of different climbing. 5.10 Anasazi VCS are good shoes as well, but they're synthetic and smell like death after a month.

  • *Also, many climbers (especially gym climbers) hit a plateau in the V4 range for awhile. Start climbing with stronger climbers and start paying attention to footwork, body positioning and core strength.
William Domhart
From Ventucky, CA
Joined Sep 22, 2011
9 points
Jul 2, 2013
Find a shoe that fits your foot well and has a slight downturn if you want to focus your climbing on overhanging terrain.

Fit is, by far, the single most important factor in a climbing shoe.
John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
Joined Feb 1, 2004
2,390 points
Jul 14, 2013
Rock Climbing Photo: Me climbing in Jamaica, VT. Photo by Rachel Squire...
I LOVE my Moccasyms. They are not very aggressive, but fit comfortably and I can climb in them without wanting to yank them off my feet in the middle of a pitch. Comfort IS important - nothing ruins a climb more than shoes that really really hurt (aside from actually getting hurt or worse).

The Moccasyms are a great shoe that both perform and are comfortable. I've climbed in more aggressive shoes that rip off the wall/rock more than these - probably because they don't fit as well and it's harder for me to feel the rock in them. Aggressive, undersized shoes are really not necessary unless you are climbing very technical climbs and have somehow accustomed your feet to misery and suffering. You will need to buy your Moccasyms a bit small (about a size is recommended) because they are leather and they will stretch. Your feet will also turn red when you first get them and the dye bleeds out. I love them though, and recommend them without hesitation.
Kari Post
From Keene, NH
Joined Sep 13, 2012
103 points

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