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Nov 11, 2012
P3 on the Nutcracker.
Looking for a few different rope recommendations.

1)Big wall rope - something I can jug on, durable, protect over sharp edges, Maybe 9.7-10.2mm
2)Alpine Routes - Maybe around 8.9-9.1mm, Easy climbing, light and fast
3)Half Ropes for Ice Climbing

Thanks in advance. I am just looking for recommendations. Im looking at Blue Water, Sterling, Elderid, New England.
Josh Allred
From Salt Lake City, UT
Joined Mar 10, 2011
135 points
Nov 11, 2012
About half way up the East Arete on Illumination R...
1) Cheapest one on MP
2) Cheapest one on MP
3) Cheapest set on MP

Enjoy!
Ben Beckerich
From saint helens, oregon
Joined Jun 24, 2011
266 points
Nov 11, 2012
Ouray Ice Park Pick o' the Vic?
Not sure you're going to get anything really profound from your question, mainly anecdotal recommendations of owners. The only thing we mostly agree upon here seems to be avoiding Petzl.

Might I advocate for American ropes? We have a bunch of US companies who make great ropes, why buy Metolius/Monster, Mammut, Petzl when they don't seem to be above and beyond? If you dig further, you can tell which of those companies manufacture in the US - New England ropes for example.

huh, my google search actually yielded something interesting this time...
rei.com/search?cat=4500081&jxM...
Hiro
From Boulder, CO
Joined Apr 2, 2012
345 points
Administrator
Nov 12, 2012
Josh Allred wrote:
something I can jug on, durable, protect over sharp edges, Maybe 9.7-10.2mm

Sorry but you just created a paradox that might end in a blackhole sucking up the Earth. Kind of like dividing by zero. Anyway, there are no 9.7mm ropes that are durable and offer great sharp edge protection. To my knowledge, there is not a single UIAA sharp edge resistant certified 9.7mm rope on the market. I dont know of any 9.xmm ropes that meet that certification. For legit bigwall, I wouldent go below 10.2mm personally. Jugging dynamic ropes pose real risk, and if it happens that the rope is running over a sharp edge, you can find yourself in a really shitty situation really quickly, especially with a thin rope. Also, getting a rope with a low elongation will increase your protection against rope failure while jugging if it happens that the rope is running over a sharp crystal or edge. Personally, I think the Maxim Glider 10.2mm rope would be great for a route like the Nose. I used the 10.5mm version when I climbed it. For other walls that involve less free climbing, the 10.5mm Glider is a great option. For serious wall slaving, there is always the trusty 11mm howser, but you might talk a lot of shit on the approach and decent - they arnt light!

Edit: The Sterling Marathon 10.2mm or 10.5 is a good option too, or if you really want, the Maxim Glider 9.9mm. If you want something light, Beal makes the lightest 10mm rope in the world, it is a 10.0mm rope and it is lighter than many 9.8mm ropes. It stretches a ton, but it would offer you the weight savings of a 9mm rope with the thickness of a 10mm.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Nov 12, 2012
OTL
20 kN wrote:
To my knowledge, there is not a single UIAA sharp edge resistant certified 9.7mm rope on the market. I dont know of any 9.xmm ropes that meet that certification.


Strike out the "9.7mm" and "9.xmm" and this would have been correct information.
Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Joined Oct 20, 2010
368 points
Nov 12, 2012
The Cathedral Spires in RMNP, left to right: Stile...
Josh Allred wrote:
1)Big wall rope - something I can jug on, durable, protect over sharp edges


10.5 - 11mil. Any manufacturer. Duct tape helps on sharp edges for serious aid.

Josh wrote:
Maybe 9.7-10.2mm


As mtn bikers say, "Light, strong, cheap: pick two." Except there is no light & strong rope that exists--nevermind affordable. In climbing, pick one of the three aforementioned choices: light, strong or cheap. Although you could probably get a strong & cheap rope.

Josh wrote:
2)Alpine Routes - Maybe around 8.9-9.1mm; 3)Half Ropes for Ice Climbing


Your #2 & 3 are inextricably linked. There's a big difference between twins and doubles, depending on which type of climbing (alpine ice v alpine rock) you prefer.

Some differences between the two rope duos:

Twins (7.x) = Lower impact forces (ea) but you generally have to clip dependently which makes impact forces higher, unfortunately. Twins are best for when you absolutely need two ropes (usually for descent) and you're looking for the lightest weight setup possible. This usually entails more ice than rock climbing.

Doubles (8.x) = You are almost always clipping each piece independently which lessens impact forces (clipping dependently gives you extraordinarily high impact forces). They're heavier overall, but are better for alpine routes that have more rock than ice. They're also a lot more durable.

Bottom line: If you want all of what you stated, you're going to have to buy five ropes. Make some compromises to save some $$$ in the near future. Twins are highly specialized and you would know if you wanted them over doubles. Or if you're a Euro.
Marc H
From Lafayette, CO
Joined May 10, 2007
280 points
Nov 12, 2012
P3 on the Nutcracker.
Maybe I didnt clarify enough. I was wondering what rope recommendations people have out there. I understand there are different ropes for different applications and that there is some overlap.

Looking for personal testimonials. I used ____ rope for this type of climbing and it was _____.

Thanks.
Josh Allred
From Salt Lake City, UT
Joined Mar 10, 2011
135 points
Nov 12, 2012
The Cathedral Spires in RMNP, left to right: Stile...
Josh Allred wrote:
I used ____ rope for this type of climbing and it was _____. Thanks.


You really think that's going to be more useful information? Anecdotal information only goes so far. People (esp on MP.com) can (and will) go on all day and night filling in the blanks. It will do you no good. Buy a rope, use it, go from there.

Two companies that you didn't list: Mammut and Edelweiss, make the best ropes on the market.

I hope that's more useful info far ya. :-)

You probably coulda called it good with Ben's advice:
Ben B. wrote:
1) Cheapest one on MP 2) Cheapest one on MP 3) Cheapest set on MP Enjoy!
Marc H
From Lafayette, CO
Joined May 10, 2007
280 points
Administrator
Nov 12, 2012
Matt N wrote:
Strike out the "9.7mm" and "9.xmm" and this would have been correct information.

A number of ropes are UIAA sharp edge resistant certified, I own a few. But yes, dynamic kernmantle ropes are often not able to withstand a serious fall over a sharp edge. Even an 11mm rope can fail if loaded over a sharp flake on a lead fall.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Administrator
Nov 12, 2012
Marc H wrote:
Edelweiss, make the best ropes on the market.

Speaking of anecdotal information. This is funny because up until Edelweiss' release of their new one-over-one sheath ropes, I would have said they are one of the worst companies on the market, at least in my experience. Companies like Beal, Sterling and Maxim have always been the golden standard worldwide. But it does not matter, it is simply a difference of good or very good. All rope manufacturers nowadays make good ropes. As long as it is UIAA certified and it is not made by Petzl, it's probably good (with a couple of exceptions).
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Administrator
Nov 12, 2012
El Chorro
I used to be a Sterling only guy, but I'm tired of how dirty the ropes get. And before anyone tells me it's not Sterling, I've had a Marathon 10.1 and two Evo Velocity 9.8's and they both turn my hands black right away. I've climbed on THREE other Evo 9.8s with the same problem.

Now I usually climb on doubles and I find that the Edelweiss Dynamic is an excellent rope. I've also found that some of their single ropes hold up quite well for teh $$. We used them to TR gumbies in Thailand and they lasted longer than any Beal rope we ever had. I currently have a 70m bipattern from them - the one that was on eBay for $100 for a while last year. I don't love it, but $100 for a 70m bipattern can't be beat.

Just get something that you can get a good deal on. If you climb enough you're going to destroy anything you buy. Buy 7 expensive $240 ropes or 11 cheap $150 ropes. Same same.

If the handle and feel is really important to you then you need to actually go and climb on some of your friends ropes 'cuz you won't get any good info about that on the internet.
Ryan Williams
From London (sort of)
Joined May 10, 2009
1,468 points
Nov 12, 2012
asking on MP is pretty useless ... the sample size is simply too small ... youre better off searching on actual reviews at retailer sites or something similar

that said ... its still pretty useless as until you can actually handle a rope, you cant tell how it will feed through that fancy gri gri ...

nor is brand name any "guarantee" of durability ... just look at the "sterling marathon" recent post to see that ANY brand of rope can wear quickly with use

just buy something that works and is cheap ... if you climb enough it wont last much longer than a year anyways ;)
bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
1,876 points
Nov 12, 2012
20 kN wrote:
A number of ropes are UIAA sharp edge resistant certified, I own a few. But yes, dynamic kernmantle ropes are often not able to withstand a serious fall over a sharp edge. Even an 11mm rope can fail if loaded over a sharp flake on a lead fall.


Some pretty old ropes you´ve got then!

"UIAA Safety Standard 108 Sharp Edge Resistant Dynamic Ropes has been suspended as of 1st July 2004.
During routine testing to the UIAA Safety Standard 108 Sharp Edge Resistant Dynamic Ropes, at the UIAA-approved test laboratories, discrepancies were found in test results for the same rope at different laboratories. Until this problem is resolved, the testing of ropes against this safety standard has been suspended at all test laboratories as from 1st July 2004.
Models of rope already certified “Sharp Edge Resistant” will retain that status until 31st December 2005."

Manufacturers are not allowed to claim their ropes passed the UIAA test after the above date.
It was a completely worthless test anyway!
Jim Titt
From Germany
Joined Nov 10, 2009
185 points
Nov 12, 2012
Free Solo up hitchcock gully WI3
bluewater ropes. made in the US of A superkick
From West Hartford, CT
Joined Aug 23, 2011
31 points
Nov 12, 2012
Mammut supersafe 10.2 for big wall rope. Steve86
Joined Jul 17, 2011
10 points
Nov 12, 2012
A well-spent Saturday night. All of the college ki...
I've had terrible luck with Mammut ropes. The sheath seems to wear very, VERY quickly.

I've always sworn by the Sterling Velocity Evo (9.8) and I've owned 3 of varying treatments and lengths that have treated me very well. (Though, I'll agree with the above that they can get dirty quickly.)

This year I tried out the Millet Triaxiale Silver, and in my opinion, it's the best rope I've ever used. It's a 9.8 but feels significantly lighter and more supple than any other 9.8 rope I've used. It handles more like a 9.4. To boot, I used it rigorously over the summer, and was hard enough on it to feel like it should have some serious wear, but aside from some black streaks caused by a partner who refuses to use anodized carabiners, it still feels and looks like new. It's slightly more expensive, but man, it's worth it.
Colin Kenneth
From San Francisco, CA
Joined Mar 3, 2006
348 points
Nov 12, 2012
The Edelrid Swift (8.9mm) is a pretty sweet rope- can be a little frightening the first few times, but my friend uses it as his only single line and they last the same as a 9.4mm or so from what he tells me.

The Swift is also certified as a half/twin line, so thats also an option for you.

If youre really into weight savings, Edelrid is releasing the Flycatcher 6.9mm twin line this spring- 35g/m. Yoswers!

I'd also recommend the Sterling Marathon (or even the Velocity) for Big Wall climbing- jugging alot, probably the Marathon for sheath thickness.
John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
Joined Feb 1, 2004
2,377 points
Nov 12, 2012
I've used a Mammut Supersafe for 4 walls and it's still in good shape. They aren't cheap, don't come in Bi-Color, but they are great for walling. Ryan Curry
Joined Jun 4, 2008
453 points
Nov 12, 2012
Jose Cuervo Fruitcups dirtbag style
Josh Allred wrote:
2)Alpine Routes - Maybe around 8.9-9.1mm, Easy climbing, light and fast 3)Half Ropes for Ice Climbing Thanks in advance. I am just looking for recommendations.


For easy climbing, light and fast, I just use one of my doubles (Mammut Genesis - don't think they make them anymore).

I have been overall pleased with my Mammut ropes experience, they handle well and last pretty long. Like others said, they're not cheap. My all-around favorite rope is Mammut Infinity, Sterling Evo Velocity is close second but like Ryan said they get dirty easily (I just wear gloves when cragging). FYI, Mammut ropes' diameters are measured under tension, therefore they usually feel fatter than other manufacturer ropes of the same diameter.
doligo
Joined Sep 26, 2008
437 points
Nov 12, 2012
P3 on the Nutcracker.
Thanks everyone. I think I am mostly leaning toward Blue Water Ropes. I have had some experience with them and like that they are Family Owned. Josh Allred
From Salt Lake City, UT
Joined Mar 10, 2011
135 points
Nov 12, 2012
The wife and I road-trippin on the Connie.
Josh Allred wrote:
Thanks everyone. I think I am mostly leaning toward Blue Water Ropes. I have had some experience with them and like that they are Family Owned.


This is kinda random, but this outdoor shop in New Jersey had 2 of the Bluewater Accelerator 10.5mm 60m in stock for only $159 as of two or three weeks ago, it would probably be a good wall rope, is recommended as such by BW. I had a $25 off coupon and snagged one of them. They normally go about $190. Check out ramseyoutdoor.com/
Larry S
From Easton, Pennsylvania
Joined May 28, 2010
918 points
Nov 12, 2012
I've found that all ropes get dirty if you use a grigri. Stop using it or keep it really really clean and you will find that your ropes wont get dirty nearly as fast. DallinH
From Utah
Joined Jan 25, 2012
7 points
Nov 12, 2012
....
Josh Allred wrote:
2)Alpine Routes - Maybe around 8.9-9.1mm, Easy climbing, light and fast... Im looking at Blue Water, Sterling, Elderid, New England.


I bought some Petzl dragonfly double-ropes for alpine. They sucked!
lperitz22
From Los Angeles, CA
Joined Aug 25, 2008
48 points
Nov 12, 2012
uintas
You can't go wrong with bluewater or sterling. I have both and love them! Mattberr
From utah
Joined May 1, 2010
27 points
Administrator
Nov 13, 2012
Jim Titt wrote:
Some pretty old ropes you´ve got then! "UIAA Safety Standard 108 Sharp Edge Resistant Dynamic Ropes has been suspended as of 1st July 2004. During routine testing to the UIAA Safety Standard 108 Sharp Edge Resistant Dynamic Ropes, at the UIAA-approved test laboratories, discrepancies were found in test results for the same rope at different laboratories. Until this problem is resolved, the testing of ropes against this safety standard has been suspended at all test laboratories as from 1st July 2004. Models of rope already certified “Sharp Edge Resistant” will retain that status until 31st December 2005." Manufacturers are not allowed to claim their ropes passed the UIAA test after the above date. It was a completely worthless test anyway!

It was a Beal Top Gun II. Beal listed the rope as sharp edge resistant certified. But yes, it was a worthless test.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Nov 13, 2012
Free Solo up hitchcock gully WI3
Im a huge fan of the Blue Water 9.7 DD lightning pro and the 9.9 DD pulse.

Also heard great things about the 9.4 hyalite but havent used it myself.
superkick
From West Hartford, CT
Joined Aug 23, 2011
31 points


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