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rope life
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By sanddude
Apr 23, 2013

Hi
i am a scout master and are troop climes about 5 days a year
and we have to retire are rope at 5 years as to the manufactures

what rope manufactures has the longest usage date
thanks scott


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By Jon H
From Boulder
Apr 23, 2013
At the matching crux

Huh?


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Apr 23, 2013
...

Ditto that, "Huh?"!


I'm thinking, "TROLL"





"we have to retire are popes at 5 5years"

Really?


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By Xzavier Thompson
From smyrna,TN
Apr 23, 2013

This can't be serious...


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By Jason Kim
From San Diego, CA
Apr 23, 2013
Descending Cox Col (Bear Creek Spire). Photo by Ryan Slaybaugh. <br />

The ability to communicate is less important than sexual orientation, apparently.


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By Allen Corneau
From Houston, TX
Apr 23, 2013

sanddude wrote:
Hi i am a scout master and are troop climes about 5 days a year and we have to retire are popes at 5 5years as to the manufactures what rope manufactures has the longest usage date thanks scott


I'll translate...

"I'm a Scout Master and our troop goes climbing about 5 days a year. According to BSA recommendations we should retire ropes after 5 years of service. What manufacturers state the longest lifespan for their ropes?"

Scott...

Since you participate in climbing activities so infrequently you should consider NOT buying your own gear. Instead, look to other resources within your council (council/district gear, other units, etc.) to borrow the gear or hire a guide service when you do want to participate in climbing activities.

It's much better to put your troop's capital elsewhere instead of buying gear that just sits in the closet for 360 days a year.


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By Kalil Oldham
From Brooklyn, NY
Apr 23, 2013
At the Harry Daley Base, Yosemite Valley.

Extrapolating from recent historical events, it looks like one pope retires every 600 years or so. Seems like a nice long usage date to me. It'd be greedy to ask for much more.


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By Brian in SLC
Apr 23, 2013
Climbing in Smuggler's Notch

I think they all are fairly similar. I'd suggest contacting them directly especially if you have any purchase advantage.

Here's Bluewaters recommendations, which, are pretty common to most rope manufacturers:

Shelf life: Although there is no conclusive evidence from nylon manufacturers, we recommend the shelf life of an unused rope to be five years.

Average length of rope life:

§ intensive and daily use: 3 to 6 months

§ use every weekend: 2 to 3 years

§ occasional use: 4 to 5 years

In any case, the actual working life of the rope should never exceed 5 years.


Some BSA requirements for gear...?

A written log of the history of each climbing rope used in the program must be kept, indicating (1) the date the rope was purchased; (2) the date the rope was placed in service; and (3) any environmental, severe, or unusual stresses that were placed on the rope. Each rope must be uniquely marked and permanently identified. All cordage used in life safety systems must be identified with the date of purchase. All cordage used in life safety systems must be retired according to the manufacturer’s recommendations or when condition warrants or five years from the date placed into service or 10 years from the date of purchase, whichever comes first. Cordage attached to protection, e.g., tricams, SLCDs, hexcentrics, etc., need not be replaced every five years unless condition warrants.


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By sanddude
Apr 23, 2013

tanks Allen



I'll translate...

"I'm a Scout Master and our troop goes climbing about 5 days a year. According to BSA recommendations we should retire ropes after 5 years of service. What manufacturers state the longest lifespan for their ropes?"

Scott...

Since you participate in climbing activities so infrequently you should consider NOT buying your own gear. Instead, look to other resources within your council (council/district gear, other units, etc.) to borrow the gear or hire a guide service when you do want to participate in climbing activities.

It's much better to put your troop's capital elsewhere instead of buying gear that just sits in the closet for 360 days a year.

thanks for the info
I am a class 2 instructor

(council gear ) is not available I will look at other units


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By Gwut
Apr 23, 2013
Me

I thought it was ten years, my bad?


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Apr 23, 2013
...

"I am a class 2 instructor"...


Curious as to what that is?


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By Allen Corneau
From Houston, TX
Apr 23, 2013

Locker wrote:
"I am a class 2 instructor"... Curious as to what that is?


It's a level of BSA climbing instructor, not to be confused with AMGA, PCIA, PCGA, or any other non-Scouting entity.


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Apr 23, 2013
...

"It's a level of BSA climbing instructor, not to be confused with AMGA, PCIA, PCGA, or any other non-Scouting entity.".


THANKS!


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By Rob Gordon
From Hollywood, CA
Apr 23, 2013
Tough Mantle Problem.  Haven't sent yet...

Does it concern anyone else that someone who climbs 5 times a year tops and barely has command of the English language is entrusted by parents, who probably think him much more qualified than he really is, to guide their children?

It would seem to me that they should hire a real guide whenever they want to do their climbing. But I guess that wouldn't be very boyscouty.

Oh well, they are probably strange fundamentalist children anyhow. This country doesn't need any more of those.


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Apr 23, 2013
...

When I worked with a climbing school in JTree, I got to work with quite a few Boy scout troops and their "Leaders". Generally the "Leaders" thought they knew their shit. I personally never met one that actually did however. But I am sure there must be some (Hopefully, many!)


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By jim.dangle
Apr 23, 2013

Rob Gordon wrote:
Does it concern anyone else that someone who climbs 5 times a year tops and barely has command of the English language is entrusted by parents, who probably think him much more qualified than he really is, to guide their children? It would seem to me that they should hire a real guide whenever they want to do their climbing. But I guess that wouldn't be very boyscouty. Oh well, they are probably strange fundamentalist children anyhow. This country doesn't need any more of those.


The original post suggests that the troop only climbs 5 days a year. Maybe the poster climbs more.

I also don't see why command of the English language should be of particular concern to parents. The poster's question makes sense.

If we start judging people by the things they write on the internet, we are all in serious trouble.

Jim


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By wivanoff
Apr 24, 2013
High Exposure

Locker wrote:
When I worked with a climbing school in JTree, I got to work with quite a few Boy scout troops and their "Leaders". Generally the "Leaders" thought they knew their shit. I personally never met one that actually did however. But I am sure there must be some (Hopefully, many!)


Only ran into two myself.

First, I ran into a BSA "leader" at a local cliff rappelling on polypropylene rope he bought at Home Depot. He was practicing with his wife and kid so that he could teach his troop how to rappel.
I tried to convince him to get a real climbing rope and some instruction. He told me he was "certified" (he passed the belay test at the local gym). Next time I saw him, he had a real climbing rope but was using Home Depot rope to build his anchor...

Second BSA "leader" I ran into was when I was climbing with a friend who had used the climbing rope to build an anchor off a tree. Scoutmaster saw it and told my friend it "wasn't redundant because it was only one loop". My friend said "It's good enough". Scoutmaster said "Yeah? Well, if you were in my troop, I'd shut you right down!" We spent the rest of the day making fun of his one loop figure 8 tie in to his harness.


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By MJMobes
From The land of steady habits
Apr 24, 2013
modern man

I've seen some crazy dangerous shit from BSA leaders. One was teaching the kids to rap and was showing off by jumping out and going really fast on a local crag when the one manky old rusty piton he was attached to pulled out. All in front of the kids...

I used to ignore stupid behavior at the crags, I still do unless kids are involved or my own safety is involved.

We all know the easy answer to the OPs question, he should too.


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Apr 24, 2013
...

"We all know the easy answer to the OPs question, he should too."



Just a wild guess. But I'm thinking he KNOWS by now.

LOL!


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By Pat Cooper
Apr 25, 2013

I'm a climber first, boy scout merit badge instructor for climbing second. I've been climbing for 25 years, up to 11a, top rope and trad, with the Direct North Buttress at my peak. I live near Houston where climbing SUCKS, so I offered my skills as a merit badge counselor. The 5 year rule for ropes is true w/ scouting. The log book thing is falling aside since it doesn't account for hrs in the sun, heavy use, light use, etc. Another requirement is only 10.5mm or greater, which is getting harder to find. The course to be a climbing instructor course was easy. I could have taught it. It scared me what some students (other adults) thought they could do/handle. No doubt Locker saw some weird shit. Happily, I'm the climbing instructor Locker hopes exists. I'm not an expert, but I know what's safe.
For sanddude, gear is expensive for a few times a year. Find another troop in the area and share. I borrow 30 helmets, shoes, and harnesses from another troop that "rents" them to me cheap, and every few years buys all new. Ropes are where you take it in the shorts.


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By Pat Cooper
Apr 25, 2013

More comments. Guide services near Austin charge approx $80 a head. They start at 9, pack it in at 5. I start at sunrise and we hike back while the sun is setting. $15 a head. Some scouts don't go because they can't afford the $80.
Sanddude, even if a rope manufacturer would state more than 5 years, not sure BSA rules would let you follow that.
We try to buy used shoes from gyms when they sell them.
And buy short ropes if you can. I rarely need all 60 meters.


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By Buff Johnson
Apr 25, 2013
smiley face

Just buy pmi and solve your problems.

Subjective as use varies, but if you don't do anything of consequence to the rope, ten years.


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