Route Guide - iPhone / Android - Partners - Forum - Photos - Deals - What's New - School of Rock
Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
rope drag is a drag
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 2 of 3.  <<First   <Prev   1  2  3   Next>   Last>>
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
By kellensfatfingers
May 8, 2012

I've always gone by a simple mantra that was first yelled at me after some horrendous rope drag leading.... " when in doubt, run it out". Ok now in all seriousness rope drag sucks. For myself before leading I spend some time looking at the pitch from the ground, trying to gain a mental picture of not only where I will be climbing but also what the rope will look like once I'm done climbing and at the top of the pitch. Maybe this is just me but I'll typically place gear farther and farther apart as I climb higher and higher.
I know the feeling of extending a piece at my waist only to feel sketched out as soon as the carabiner slides down the rope to my feet but that's just part of leading. I've even heard of placing gear above your waist referred to as "chicken clipping". Now let's get one thing straight. I'm a chicken clipping mofo but I have taken the idea behind the phrase to heart. As a lead climber, one is supposed to trust in their abilities first, the gear below you keeps you from decking thus providing safety in the instance that your hands and feet fail you. Set it, extend it, and forget it. Time to keep climbing. Also 12 shoulder length runners should make any pitch in the world pretty drag free. IM not knocking ya I'm just saying.


FLAG
By Cory
From Boise, ID
May 8, 2012
Relaxing in the Tuttle Creek Campground after a fun day in the Hills

One other thing to consider is that rope drag usually occurs at the end of a pitch, when you are likely to be out of sight from your belayer. Not only does rope drag make it harder for you to progress, but it also makes it more difficult for your belayer to feel your movement in the rope. If your belayer is not very experienced, or just not paying perfect attention, they may not pay out slack as quickly as you like. They may not even realize they're doing it. If this happens it can turn crappy but manageable rope drag into an unwanted game of tug-o-war that greatly increases the effects of the rope drag.

If I'm about to lead a long pitch where I suspect rope drag may be an issue, I sometimes ask my partner to belay with a bit of extra slack toward the end of the pitch when I'm out of sight. This, plus thinking your protection scheme out per the previous comments, usually mitigates any serious rope drag.


FLAG
By Rob Selter
From running springs Ca
May 8, 2012
me

Stay on route and extend. When I first started leading trad I was all over the place. I had one really bad experiece with rope drag and since have taken all steps to aviod it.


FLAG
By Sorden
From inside the Bubble, Colorado
May 8, 2012
~Here to party~

Elena Sera Jose wrote:
So I've used tricks like walking cams instead of frequent placing. I also back clean and back extend pieces finding clipping into extended piece right away may be sketchy so I clip into the cam biner then go back and extend the piece from higher stance. It seems like a lot if work and im not sure if anybody else does it.


Everybody else does it. Walking and back-cleaning, like you're doing, is part of the essential bag-o-tricks every trad leader may one day employ. Keep doing it and keep trying all the other techniques mentioned. Don't forget you can link together over-the-shoulder runners in placements where that much extension would be prudent. Always consider direction of pull and protect the second!

My partner led a long, wandering pitch the other evening, leading the rope through two rope-swallowing cracks. Near the top, he was jerking on the rope to escape the nasty drag he'd created. Now, we're regular partners and we have a sophisticated and predetermined method of rope-tug communication on route, out of sight, sound; no problem. But I thought to myself at the time, this might be a dangerous situation if somebody else was belaying him and misread these sharp tugs for: one, two, three: off-be-lay.


FLAG
By Dan Bachen
May 8, 2012

I used to have horrible experiences with drag when I was starting out on trad. It is definitely getting better now that I'm more comfortable running it out and not sewing climbs up as much. I think the best technique is to look at the pitch and visualize the rope running in as strait a line as possible between belays, then while climbing use slings and place protection in such a way as to run the rope along this line. Just remember every time the direction of the rope changes through a biner or over a lip friction is introduced into the system.


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 8, 2012
bacon

Sorden wrote:
Everybody else does it. Walking and back-cleaning, like you're doing, is part of the essential bag-o-tricks every trad leader may one day employ. Keep doing it and keep trying all the other techniques mentioned. Don't forget you can link together over-the-shoulder runners in placements where that much extension would be prudent. Always consider direction of pull and protect the second! My partner led a long, wandering pitch the other evening, leading the rope through two rope-swallowing cracks. Near the top, he was jerking on the rope to escape the nasty drag he'd created. Now, we're regular partners and we have a sophisticated and predetermined method of rope-tug communication on route, out of sight, sound; no problem. ButI thought to myself at the time, this might be a dangerous situation if somebody else was belaying him and misread these sharp tugs for: one, two, three: off-be-lay.

Same exact situation on the owl rock at the arches with me leading, the drag, and the wind picking up the remainder of free hanging ropes. I was tugging three times and my partner thought I was off. I thought we should do three close tugs in a row but when I pull for slack not to pull so frequent in a row or something.... that may complicate things.


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 8, 2012
bacon

Andrew Haag wrote:
Dont use a rope.

Boulderers need not reply either please


FLAG
By ian watson
From Albuquerque, NM
May 8, 2012

This might ruin your thread, and I might get the chair for saying it but here she goes... In cracks that are vertical then bend to a smaller angle (if that made sense) try to put a hex leangthwise right before the bend the rope will slide on the hex and not go into the crack and give you rope drag hell. I only carry 7,8,9,10 hex but about 50-60% I can manage to pull this off although i dont climb a ton of cracks.

EDIT: I suppose a big bro would do the same thing anyone got info on that?


FLAG
 
By csproul
From Rancho Cordova, CA
May 8, 2012
Summit of Wolf's Head with Pingora in the background

rope solo


FLAG
By Boissal
From Small Lake, UT
May 8, 2012

Elena Sera Jose wrote:
owl rock at the arches

If you managed to create rope drag on a 100' pitch of pretty much straight in crack while using runners, the usual bag-o-tricks might not be sufficient...

I agree that the wind can be heinous, especially on slabs. It gets about as bad a getting short-roped sometimes.


FLAG
By George Bell
From Boulder, CO
May 8, 2012
Hip trouble ...

Don't buy a 70m rope. At least you are not carrying around 10m of extra rope.


FLAG
By Crag Dweller
From New York, NY
May 8, 2012
My navigator keeps me from getting lost

Elena Sera Jose wrote:
...I was tugging three times and my partner thought I was off...


If your belayer is feeling you tug multiple times, rope drag isn't your problem, your belayer is.

Edit to add: And, you're probably placing gear too far above your head. You shouldn't need to pull up that much rope, especially if you're extending draws.


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 8, 2012
bacon

Boissal wrote:
If you managed to create rope drag on a 100' pitch of pretty much straight in crack while using runners, the usual bag-o-tricks might not be sufficient... I agree that the wind can be heinous, especially on slabs. It gets about as bad a getting short-roped sometimes.

Go do the owl "cracks" then u tell me! Im not talking about straight line cracks here like 30 sec over potash (lead no draws) or chocolate corner (did not lead that one yet) yeah it depends on how straight and how shallow or deep the line of protection is on the route. Hexes? No thank you. On serious note : I like the rule if three when u look down where u placed and ahead to where the next potential placement would be and create a straight line. Anyway all good thoughts and tips thank you!


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 8, 2012
bacon

Crag Dweller wrote:
If your belayer is feeling you tug multiple times, rope drag isn't your problem, your belayer is. Edit to add: And, you're probably placing gear too far above your head. You shouldn't need to pull up that much rope, especially if you're extending draws.

I was at the top of the owl on a scramble and my belayer is really good actually he did not take me off. I kept tugging up the ropes fighting the drag on easy terrain ( frustrated ) but he kept me on the whole time.


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 8, 2012
bacon

csproul wrote:
rope solo

Done that


FLAG
By Ryan N
From San Louis Obispo
May 8, 2012
RJN

Trolls are a drag! It's just part of life gotta deal with trolls, gotta deal with rope drag. As NAS put it so eloquently " lifes a bitch and the u die".


FLAG
 
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 8, 2012
bacon

Ryan N wrote:
Trolls are a drag! It's just part of life gotta deal with trolls, gotta deal with rope drag. As NAS put it so eloquently " lifes a bitch and the u die".

Sweet baby Jesus we made it in America! ;)


FLAG
By Crag Dweller
From New York, NY
May 8, 2012
My navigator keeps me from getting lost

there's an easy way to avoid rope drag on 4th class scrambles. don't do them roped up. and, if you're going to drag the rope behind you on a scramble, expect quite a lot of rope drag.


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 8, 2012
bacon

I keep asking Mr. Stone to drag me up on Castleton ;)


FLAG
By russellHOBART
From Davidson, NC
May 8, 2012
I'm the one in the blue running jacket

I would add two things-


1)After you place each piece and pass it(5' above maybe) check to see what the rope is doing. Often if will catch on something inadvertently but you can clean it up with a little rope flick.
2) Think of the climb in 3 dimensions, not 2. Try to avoid placements where the climb cuts in (directly below roofs is an obvious example).


FLAG
By 1Eric Rhicard
May 9, 2012
It is a good sized roof. Photo: Jimbo

Indian Creek! Problem solved, usually.


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 9, 2012
bacon

1Eric Rhicard wrote:
Indian Creek! Problem solved, usually.

Im not strong enough climber for most of the creek btw its almost getting too hot anyway so banished to front range for the most part ( tough life) im taking all the tips I can. A troll is a troll is a troll but this thread is helpful. I think I troll involuntarily now haha!


FLAG
By Rob Selter
From running springs Ca
May 9, 2012
me

Wow buddy what do you have against spot climbers and bouldering (both have hepled my trad game)? Trad, sport, and bouldering are all types of climbing have some respect. And It is possible to create rope drag on a bolted climb, some spot climber may have some advice that could help you. So How were you introduced to climbing? It sound like you haven't been climbing trad that long.

Are you just someone that wants to turn this sport into something like surfing? Where nearly every one in the water thinks they are just to cool to speak to one another. And there is some dumb conflict between long boarding and short boarding.


FLAG
By Elena Sera Jose
From colorado
May 9, 2012
bacon

Yea I don't talk to boulders cos bouldering is bad for my ankles, I don't talk to sport climbers cos all they wanna do is project and someone to bitch belay them, I only talk to trad climbers cos they got the best epics to share and moderate long routes are up my alley and the gear just plain kicks a$s! I don't talk to non climbers at all.


FLAG
 
By Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
May 9, 2012
Cleo's Needle

I have to admit, you're annoying enough that I'd probably avoid helping you in an emergency.


FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 2 of 3.  <<First   <Prev   1  2  3   Next>   Last>>