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Rope bag suggestion
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By Lou C
Dec 2, 2012
The view from GT Ledge in the Gunks

Need a rope bag that has minimal bulk. I'm packing for an international climbing trip and I'm trying to keep my load as small/light as possible. Something with nice compression straps would rock! Was looking at the Metolius Ropemaster but it might be a tad bulky. Was also looking at the metolius Dirtbag. Any thoughts?


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By LML
Dec 2, 2012
Making Sauce...

59 Cents


ikea
ikea


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By Lou C
Dec 2, 2012
The view from GT Ledge in the Gunks

LML wrote:
59 Cents


Had given this a serious thought. The lack of compression straps turns me off though. Would be clunky to carry around an airport.


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By Tits McGee
From Boulder, CO
Dec 2, 2012
How I Send

I've got a black diamond superslacker that compresses pretty well.

It's for sale...
www.mountainproject.com/v/fs---wild-things--bd--msr--patagon>>>


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By shoo
From Boston, Massachusetts
Dec 2, 2012
Rock wars, Red River Gorge

Lou C wrote:
Had given this a serious thought. The lack of compression straps turns me off though. Would be clunky to carry around an airport.


I sewed straps on and threaded a draw-string through mine. Total cost: something like $3. Compresses down to like nothing.

My next version is going to feature all of that, and an integrated tarp, the idea for which is basically stolen from this


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By bearbreeder
Dec 2, 2012

wrap the ikea with webbing and a buckle ...

or buy a rope that comes with a free bag ... you know youll wear out yr current rope if ya use it enough regardless ;)


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By david doucette
Dec 2, 2012
Top of Intersection Rock, Joshua Tree NP.

i own three ropes and have the metolious ropemaster for all of them. i love the bag and it's got the built in tarp to keep your rope out of the dirt/sand when in use. the older ones have plastic buckles but the newer ones have metal buckles which are much better. i coil the rope, fold it in half and it fits nicely into the ropemaster and the bag shrinks down to the rope size. awesome bag.

david


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By John D
Dec 2, 2012

my thought is no rope bag. I have and love my metolious ropemaster (I think) and I love it, but if you're honestly looking to save weight and bulk, ditch the rope bag. Your rope will get a little dirty, and you have to coil it, or shove it in your pack, but other than that it's fine.

Backup ideas if you feel like you need to have something to put your rope on when you're on the ground is find a small light tarp to use on the ground. Or fly to your destination and then find something to use as a ropebag once you get there.


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By Andy M
From Murfreesboro TN
Dec 2, 2012

I like the BD Super Chute. 2 compression straps and a big tarp. The padding on the strap is okay, just don't load it with all your gear and you'll be fine. $40 at Backcountry.


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By Brian Scoggins
From Eugene, OR
Dec 2, 2012

John D wrote:
my thought is no rope bag. I have and love my metolious ropemaster (I think) and I love it, but if you're honestly looking to save weight and bulk, ditch the rope bag. Your rope will get a little dirty, and you have to coil it, or shove it in your pack, but other than that it's fine. Backup ideas if you feel like you need to have something to put your rope on when you're on the ground is find a small light tarp to use on the ground. Or fly to your destination and then find something to use as a ropebag once you get there.


This is good advice if you're not going to Thailand, or anywhere else where you'll be flopping your rope down in *sand*.

I've got both the BD super-slacker, which seriously sucks, and the Metolius Rope Ranger and Rope Master. I love the Metolius bags, but they're big and heavy and I don't like using them if I have to carry the rope bag with me while I climb. The discontinued Ranger, by virtue of having shoulder straps, is a pretty good second's pack, but way beyond what you need.

Almost by definition, a purpose-built ropebag will not be light enough or low-volume enough to really not be noticed. The metolius Dirtbag might be the best compromise, but still.


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By Pitty
From Marbach
Dec 3, 2012
My cool Elly....

I like the BD one..... www.blackdiamondequipment.com/de-ch/shop/climb/climbing-pack>>>


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Dec 3, 2012
El Chorro

Just because they make ropebags doesn't mean they are essential. Save your money. Go to IKEA. Spend your savings on something fun, not just another "thing" that you'll end up stuffing in the back of the closet.

Trust me - the IKEA bag is the best bag anyway. Are you carrying the rope separately? Out side your luggage? If so then get a cheap compression strap from an outdoor store $3.99 and be done with it. But I'd suggest just stuffing the rope and bag in your luggage. That's what I do, and I fly with gear all time time.


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By aed
From Jackson, WY
Dec 3, 2012
aed

I've got a Dirtbag that I'll sell for $20 shipped in the lower 48.
It's in good shape, and clean. Red.

PM if interested.


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By Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Dec 3, 2012
Mathematical!

I use the Metolius rope bag, and it packs down super small, especially if you coil the rope inside. If you're in the market for a new rope bag though, I'd check out this one: www.edelrid.de/en/sports/products/bags/caddy.html

I haven't used it, but it seems pretty slick to me.


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By A.Javi.Gecko
From San Diego, CA
Dec 3, 2012
V3, Castle Hill, NZ

Lou C wrote:
Had given this a serious thought. The lack of compression straps turns me off though. Would be clunky to carry around an airport.


I have this Advanced Base Camp model:

www.libertymountain.com/shop/product.asp?p=2700&c=2165

though I don't think I paid $30 for it. If you're travelling, a rope bag is worth it IMO. Bag limits are 20 to 23 kg for most flights nowadays and my rope bag when filled with a 70m rope, shoes, harness, draws, helmet, etc weighed in at 15kg. Because this bag is pretty big and durable, I could fit a bit more stuff into it and just use it as a separate luggage instead of struggling to make bag weight. It made me a BIT nervous exposing my goods to TSA like that but nobody has jacked any of my dirty gear yet. The model I own has plastic buckles for the compression straps and one of them broke, probably because I was trying to fit too much stuff into it, so I'd replace them with some metal cinches. I really like this style:

www.rei.com/product/813688/sea-to-summit-hook-release-access>>>

mostly because the metal wont break and when you're travelling and constantly adjusting your goods, which may be strapped together as "one 23kg bag," its nice to just hook it and pull rather than fiddling the strap through every time or counting on a crappy plastic buckle.

For regular climbing trips, as our fellow MPers have been saying, a rope bag is non-essential. All you really need is a tarp for protection and butterfly powers to carry your rope as a back pack. Alternately you could just keep your rope in a 35L backpack with your gear but depending on your food, water and clothing situation, you might end up with chalk and aluminum on everything. Because my rope bag is approaching 30L when full, I carry that full of gear and a separate 20L daypack for my layers/food/camera/firstaid (when travelling, compressable daypacks rock!). I COULD fit it all into my giant backpacking bag but don't really want to lug around a 70L bag while sport climbing. I will say that this system only works ok, but its a bit cumbersome to wear a pack on your belly AND back on any approach longer than 20 minutes. However, usually you can coordinate with your partner and only have 1 pack and 1 rope bag between the two of you.

When I get back to California and have access to my 40L "cragpack" again, I think I'll still use my rope bag, just not for rope. The rope bag, when full, won't fit in the cragpack (silly, I know but I do often carry too much sh*t). Instead, I'll put clothes/food/water at the bottom of the cragpack and load the rope bag full of my gear on top. This keeps all the dirty stuff compressed and easily accessible, protecting "delicate" things like down jackets and sandwiches from getting mangled. On top of that, I'll butterfly my rope and fold it over the backpack, securing it between the "brain" and main compartment of the bag. This system keeps everything compartmentalized and easy to find and then when I get to the crag, I can just unfold the tarp and start climbing without unpacking the whole shebang. Its also a time saver when packing back up after a day out as you don't have to pull EVERYTHING in you backpack out to get to your climbing stuff.

The bottom line (for me anyway) is while a rope bag with tarp isn't ESSENTIAL, it saves me hassle while climbing and while toting gear across the globe. Hopefully the extra-long explanation added something to the conversation.


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By TomCaldwell
From Clemson, S.C.
Dec 3, 2012
Me on One Pitch Wonder at Whitesides.  Photo credits to Kyle Jones and his lucky anti-rain jacket.

I stopped using a rope bag, and only carry a backpacking poncho. It rains so much in the SE, some sort of rain gear is necessary, especially during the summer. It lays out bigger than most tarps that come with the rope bags out there. If your cragging, you can just grab the four corners of the poncho to lift the poncho with rope in it and carry it to the next climb. I definitely like the versatility of the poncho as a rope bag and don't like having to carry the rope bag on the front of me especially during technical approaches. To carry the rope on the approach in, I just coil it and stuff it in my backpack. The poncho stuffs down smaller than any rope bag I have seen.


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Dec 3, 2012
El Chorro

Brian Wright wrote:
Why do people ask the most banal questions like these? A rope bag? 5 minutes of online searching ought to find all the information you need. you arent selecting a future spouse, just get one. Really they arent that much different


Because they are obsessed with thinking about rock climbing.


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By jhn payne
Dec 3, 2012
"Ragin Cajun" 5.12c Jackson Falls, So Il.

Well I can tell you what I did, after years of the rope bag thing which one re configures after each route, i.e. roll the rope up, cinch it all down to just put it in "another pack" and carry on.I found a nice tarp which I now lay my rope in, burrito the tarp and lay it on top of everything else in my pack and I'm ready to go, next route open main pack pull out tarp and climb.


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By KENtucky
From Richmond, Ky
Dec 3, 2012
FAIL <br />

The metolius ropemaster is great. I had it for a couple years and when it got ripped, i picked up a couple other brands but ended up replacing my ropemaster. It rolls up tight, chinch cord keeps it tight and two compression straps and back pack straps if you need them. carries everything i need for sport climbing if i dont want to take the pack


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By Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Dec 3, 2012
Cleo's Needle

I have an Arcteryx Pali. I use it cragging and it fits in the bottom of a Miura 50. I prefer not to just throw my rope in the dirt. Alpine and link-ups I leave the bag in the car.


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By Lou C
Dec 3, 2012
The view from GT Ledge in the Gunks

Thanx for the suggestions everyone. I have been climbing for a while and I have never saw it necessary to buy a rope bag. Needless money spent. The way I'm trying to pack for this trip has opened me up to maybe buying one.

Climbing gear and clothing will go in a backpack as my carryon.
Rope will go into a small compressible bag that will be my "personal item".

Why am I asking which rope bag to get? I'm trying to find something that is the least bulk and most compressible. It's tough to find out what the least bulky is without getting them in my hands. I think I'm just gonna go with the ikea bag and wrap it with webbing to compress it.

Wish I lived near an Ikea.


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By A.Javi.Gecko
From San Diego, CA
Dec 3, 2012
V3, Castle Hill, NZ

Lou C wrote:
Climbing gear and clothing will go in a backpack as my carryon. Rope will go into a small compressible bag that will be my "personal item".


Hopefully nobody is too snarky about your carry-on item weight. The limit for my international flight was 7kg but they let 10 slide b/c laptops are heavy (a 16kg bag was a no-go). Hopefully that bag weighs less than 20lbs. If its heavy and you get it through security some carriers let you gate-check a bag for free but that may be dependent upon the distance you're travelling.


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By Brandon Gottung
From Moab, UT
Dec 3, 2012
В Екатеринбурге

When I travel internationally, I just bring a 6'x3' or so piece of tyvek. It doubles as a rope tarp and a ground cloth to sleep on, costs a couple dollars and is super light. It's easy to grab the corners and carry the rope from route to route.


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By Lou C
Dec 4, 2012
The view from GT Ledge in the Gunks

A.Javi.Gecko wrote:
Hopefully nobody is too snarky about your carry-on item weight. The limit for my international flight was 7kg but they let 10 slide b/c laptops are heavy (a 16kg bag was a no-go). Hopefully that bag weighs less than 20lbs. If its heavy and you get it through security some carriers let you gate-check a bag for free but that may be dependent upon the distance you're travelling.


Pack is under 20 lbs. I'm packing light since I will have to carry this around with me everywhere anyway.


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By Lou C
Dec 4, 2012
The view from GT Ledge in the Gunks

Brandon Gottung wrote:
When I travel internationally, I just bring a 6'x3' or so piece of tyvek. It doubles as a rope tarp and a ground cloth to sleep on, costs a couple dollars and is super light. It's easy to grab the corners and carry the rope from route to route.


Nice call on the tyvek. I usually stuff an old 1 man tent footprint into the bottom of my bag for that very purpose! Tyvek would maybe be more packable.


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By paul.mourer
Dec 4, 2012

+1 for tarps, etc. works well and packs down small. i would always coil and backpack my rope anyway when leaving so its nice just for hopping around sandy crags. Also, if you really want to you can tie it to the end of a stick and carry it around like a hobo. it works surprisingly well


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