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Replacement for my Marmot Dri Clime Windshirt
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By Mike McKinnon
From Golden, CO
Aug 20, 2014
Bunny pancake
This piece has been my go to piece for so long. The temperature range on it is awesome, it is light, and can be worn alone or with a SS or LS shirt underneath it. Needless to say, I love it. However, my one complaint is that is gets shredded in any kind of chimney or anytime it comes into contact with rock (like anytime I trad climb).

I am looking for a replacement that is more durable but I dont know where to start. Do any of you own a piece that performs the same function but is more durable. I was looking at the Arc Teryx Epsilon LT. Anyone use that before?

Any suggestions you might have on what you like to wear for this type of piece would be great.

Thanks

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By Jon H
From Boulder
Aug 20, 2014
At the matching crux
Nylon is nylon is nylon.

Most manufacturers get their raw textiles from the same handful of mills. Nobody has a 90 denier nylon that's any more durable than any other 90 denier nylon.

The benefits of the Driclime make it inherently fragile. Luckily, the jacket isn't expensive and can be found on closeout at the end of every season for $40ish. With judicious use of duct tape and seam grip, you can probably get 2-3 seasons out of each one, then toss it when it no longer hangs on your body.

No point in spending $200 on an Arcteryx when it's going to get shredded basically as quickly.

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By Mike McKinnon
From Golden, CO
Aug 20, 2014
Bunny pancake
Jon H wrote:
Nylon is nylon is nylon. Most manufacturers get their raw textiles from the same handful of mills. Nobody has a 90 denier nylon that's any more durable than any other 90 denier nylon. The benefits of the Driclime make it inherently fragile. Luckily, the jacket isn't expensive and can be found on closeout at the end of every season for $40ish. With judicious use of duct tape and seam grip, you can probably get 2-3 seasons out of each one, then toss it when it no longer hangs on your body. No point in spending $200 on an Arcteryx when it's going to get shredded basically as quickly.


Well I guess that is my point. The arcteryx version is a more abrasion resistant material. It wont shred like the marmot. I don't need an exact replica (obviously it would shred just as easily). I am willing to give up some stuff if the jacket wont rip to pieces in the first chimney I get in.

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By GhaMby
From Heaven
Aug 20, 2014
something softshell-like will be more abrasion resistant, and less slippery, but also less windproof. Maybe wear a wind breaker over a softshell piece and take the wind layer off during goes???

I have these jackets that I love for climbing in on cold days, and they haven't gotten thrashed (but I mostly sports climb in the winter):

Rab Shadow Hoodie: Made from Wind Pro Hard Face Fleece (blocks 40% more wind than regular fleece), I fit RAB clothes really well, so find a company that uses wind pro and fits your body.

us.rab.uk.com/products/mens-cl...

I love this lightweight Softshell pullover, it's so light that I don't notice it's there until I take it off.

backcountry.com/rab-boreas-pul...

Patagonia Polarized Hoody: This is what I wear when it's a little hot and I'm in a chimney/offwidth. It still looks new despite my poor technique and raspberries on my elbows and shoulders. Get one now if you can.

6pm.com/patagonia-polarized-ho...

I realize that none of these items are anything like the Driclime, but they work for me.

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By rgold
From Poughkeepsie, NY
Aug 20, 2014
The traverse out to the Yellow Ridge on the Dogstick Ridge link-up.  Photo by Myriam Bouchard
I've gone through two Driclimes but am now using a Vapourise Lite by Rab, which I like better for its lightness, breathability, drying time, and packability, all of which are slightly better than the Marmot version. us.rab.uk.com/products/mens-cl... . Of course, it isn't quite as warm, but for my uses that's actually better. Rab makes a regular-weight Vapourise as well as a pullover model and alpine models that have hoods. I hate the elastic cuffs on the Marmot version and much prefer the velcro ones on the Rab. The shell material on the Rab is light and not shiny. I doubt that it is any different than the Marmot shell when it comes to durability. These are not off-widthing pieces!

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By Mike McKinnon
From Golden, CO
Aug 20, 2014
Bunny pancake
Thanks guys for the suggestions. I will look into all those pieces. I have never worn anything by Rab so i am quite interested in looking at those.

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By jaredj
Aug 20, 2014
Had good luck with the BD Alpine Start Hoody so far. It's like a heavyweight windshirt / superlight softshell. Hood is helmet compatible. A little thicker than thin nylon and more abrasion resistant without being super hot.

I've worn it in conditions that I would have previously done the Driclime, and have been happy so far.

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By Wyatt H
From Casper, Wy
Aug 20, 2014
The Rab Vapour Rise Lite Alpine is what I replaced my driclime with. It is maybe a slightly heavier, but more durable, has a hood, and a few more pockets. It has basically the same lining and an outer layer of stretchy but very thin softshellish material.

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By rgold
From Poughkeepsie, NY
Aug 20, 2014
The traverse out to the Yellow Ridge on the Dogstick Ridge link-up.  Photo by Myriam Bouchard
According to manufacturer's websites,

Driclime windshirt 249 g
Vapourise Lite Jacket 274 g
Vapourise Lite Alpine Jacket (hood) 343 g

Numbers nothwithstanding, my Vapourise Lite is noticeably lighter than my Driclime windshirt. But maybe Marmot has lightened it up in the last three years.

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