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By Hamlet73
From Boulder, CO
Jul 24, 2014
pic taken in J-tree
Was it an African or European Giraffe??

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By kevin deweese
From Oakland, Ca
Jul 24, 2014
Birds and Beards
Mathias wrote:
After finding out how many guys I work with can't divide a fraction, I think moving to the metric system might be a really good idea. Or at the very least, take the heat off of me as the shop's human calculator.


The guys at your shop know that they have an actual calculator in their pocket that can text and receive phone calls too right?

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By hikingdrew
From Los Angeles, CA
Jul 24, 2014
dorky helmet
Mathias wrote:
After finding out how many guys I work with can't divide a fraction, I think moving to the metric system might be a really good idea. Or at the very least, take the heat off of me as the shop's human calculator.


I had physics undergrads at UCLA who didn't know how to do fractions:
"So it's about 5 in 8 so that's .625"
"Whoa, how'd you do that?"
"It's a common metal shop fraction, so I have it memorized."
"No, how do you get .625?"
"Um, divide 5 by 8? Try it on you calculator."
"Really? Cool thanks.."
>facepalm<

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By Moof
From Portland, OR
Jul 24, 2014
It's handy to be dual language. I have done a lot of work in mils, and a lot in microns. It takes me a day or so to swap between the two and be fully proficient, but I can carry on a conversation with a machinist (mils, usually), then swap to working on an IC (microns) no problem.

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By Matt Wilson
From Bethel, Vermont, USA
Jul 24, 2014
Gunks Jesse wrote:
Giraffes. Measure all things in giraffes. "I took a 1 giraffe fall yesterday." "Wow, are you ok?" "Yeah, but my neck is a little sore." "Must've been an adult male giraffe?" "Yep. It was a huge adult male giraffe fall."

Tell me you are referencing this:
hat-if.xkcd.com/44/

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By Stone Nude
Jul 24, 2014
Name that amazing rack...
First MP thread to reach 200 pages, I predict....

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By Brian Scoggins
From Boise, ID
Jul 24, 2014
hikingdrew wrote:
I had physics undergrads at UCLA who didn't know how to do fractions: "So it's about 5 in 8 so that's .625" "Whoa, how'd you do that?" "It's a common metal shop fraction, so I have it memorized." "No, how do you get .625?" "Um, divide 5 by 8? Try it on you calculator." "Really? Cool thanks.." >facepalm<


That is simply horrifying. Fractions are probably the most complicated mathematical concept that everyone should know.

During the final days of graduate school (in physics) I overheard a class. The instructor said "see if you can figure this one out: one half times one fourth". This was, apparently, going to be on their final. In college.

I still, almost reflexively, convert decimals to fractions because the math is easier to do in my head that way.

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By BigFeet
From Texas
Jul 24, 2014
Giraffes, best idea yet?

I vote to nominate giraffes as at least a consideration if this does go to vote.

You guys are hilarious. :)

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By Gary Bernstein 1
From Johannesburg, Gauteng
Jul 25, 2014
Makes sense.
Makes sense.

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By Matt Wilson
From Bethel, Vermont, USA
Jul 25, 2014
Until England starts driving on the correct side of the road, I don't want to hear anything.

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By patto
Jul 25, 2014
Matt Wilson wrote:
Until England starts driving on the correct side of the road, I don't want to hear anything.


Well the US also has a territory that drives on the left. The U.S. Virgin Islands. ;-)

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By gtluke
Jul 25, 2014
I like how everyone thinks the rest of the world is metric. Watch an episode of top gear on BBC.
Did they just say speed in MPH and distance in KM?
what size rims does your prius have? on what bolt circle?
The US government agencies and the auto industry have been metric for decades.
Go to canada, buy a sheet of plywood. What size is it? What kind of 2x4 are you going to hold it up with? A 2 what by 4 what?

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By Matt Wilson
From Bethel, Vermont, USA
Jul 25, 2014
patto wrote:
Well the US also has a territory that drives on the left. The U.S. Virgin Islands. ;-)


Until they gain statehood, I don't want to hear it
:p

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By hikingdrew
From Los Angeles, CA
Jul 25, 2014
dorky helmet
Brian Scoggins wrote:
That is simply horrifying. Fractions are probably the most complicated mathematical concept that everyone should know.


"Yo, I want the 1/4 pound burger because it's bigger than the 1/3 pound burger."

Apparently, this was a real problem:
nytimes.com/2014/07/27/magazin...

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By 20 kN
Administrator
From Hawaii
Jul 26, 2014
I think we should include rope length requirements too. My 120m rope doesent seem to be cutting it for some of the Euro crags. I am thinking of upgrading to 200m.

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By 20 kN
Administrator
From Hawaii
Jul 26, 2014
gtluke wrote:
The US government agencies

As someone who works for said agencies, no we dont. We use US Standard for most stuff just like everyone else in the US. NASA maybe being the main exception. Hospitals tend to use metric though.

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By gtluke
Jul 27, 2014
I'm talking about the big ones. NASA obvously, but the Army has been using metric forever right?
I"m sure their pants are still measured in inches, but when they call in airstrikes, 1 click out. 1KM.
But I thought clicks were measurements of how many clicks on your garand's sight to be on target. hmf.
maybe I'm confused.

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By Eliot Augusto
From Boulder, CO
Jul 27, 2014
gtluke wrote:
I'm talking about the big ones. NASA obvously, but the Army has been using metric forever right? I"m sure their pants are still measured in inches, but when they call in airstrikes, 1 click out. 1KM. But I thought clicks were measurements of how many clicks on your garand's sight to be on target. hmf. maybe I'm confused.


A click comes from older guns on ships that could shoot dozens of miles. A full click of the dial (9.1-10.0) would change the point of impact of the shell by 1000 meters on the deck, with no altitude change or weather variables.

When sighting a rifle people will often use the term click as in: "4 clicks L, 2 clicks up" which is also how to call impact changes with artillery.

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By reboot
From Westminster, CO
Jul 28, 2014
gtluke wrote:
What kind of 2x4 are you going to hold it up with? A 2 what by 4 what?

Of course, a 2x4 is NOT a 2 what by 4 what...

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By Buff Johnson
Jul 28, 2014
We have both types in the USA, country and western...

why rednecks in pick-up trucks suck at science

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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Jul 28, 2014
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
Eliot Augusto wrote:
A click comes from older guns on ships that could shoot dozens of miles. A full click of the dial (9.1-10.0) would change the point of impact of the shell by 1000 meters on the deck, with no altitude change or weather variables. When sighting a rifle people will often use the term click as in: "4 clicks L, 2 clicks up" which is also how to call impact changes with artillery.



Yep, it's both. The distance changes with the application of the word though. Obviously with a rifle, 4 clicks L is not going to change the strike of the round by 4,000m starboard.

A click also means 1,000m when applied to distance traveled via land navigation. The metric system is much more readily applied to military largely because of land navigation and indirect fire. It's all about the target and how close you can get to it. A 4 digit grid gets you to within a click, a 6 within 100m, an 8 within 10m and so on and so forth. Try that shit with miles, yards, feet and inches and you'll see some heads pop pretty quickly.

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By gtluke
Jul 28, 2014
Ah awesome. Cool info and I didn't have to visit wikipedia :)
I have an M1 Garand, those iron click sights are almost impossibly accurate. i couldn't believe how accurate a gun could be with iron sights. Really cool piece of history. I complain carrying my climbing pack around, I couldn't imagine having to haul that gun around, it's sooooo heavy. My back hurts shooting it while standing for just a few minutes! haha

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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Jul 28, 2014
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
This is def. off topic, and I apologize but gtluke, you're on the money. My stepdad has an M1 and I got a chance to shoot it in AZ on his neighbor's property. They had a red painted piece of lead that was about 12"X8"X12" and at 300 yards I was pinging that bad boy. I couldn't believe it. Having been trained in marksmanship on an M16A1, the most difficult part about shooting that thing was holding it up haha. It was extremely accurate to say the least.

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By Eliot Augusto
From Boulder, CO
Jul 28, 2014
Jake Jones wrote:
Yep, it's both. The distance changes with the application of the word though. Obviously with a rifle, 4 clicks L is not going to change the strike of the round by 4,000m starboard. A click also means 1,000m when applied to distance traveled via land navigation. The metric system is much more readily applied to military largely because of land navigation and indirect fire. It's all about the target and how close you can get to it. A 4 digit grid gets you to within a click, a 6 within 100m, an 8 within 10m and so on and so forth. Try that shit with miles, yards, feet and inches and you'll see some heads pop pretty quickly.



To add on to this and clarify my original point: Indirect fire uses mils(6400 mils to a circle). 1 mil difference adds a 1m different to target location per 1000m traveled. E.g. - Firing at 1600mil 10km out, then changing to 1601mil 10km out will put the round 10 meters farther south. The values are different for each gun but the principal is the same.

Here is one odd bit of info i never understood. The USMC zeros their rifles at 30yds, then proceeds to use meters in literally every other part of using the rifle.

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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Jul 28, 2014
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
Eliot Augusto wrote:
The USMC zeros their rifles at 30yds, then proceeds to use meters in literally every other part of using the rifle.


Things may have changed since I got out in '99, but as far as I know, this is only true in Sniper marksmanship. If you look at the elevation knob on the rear sight aperture of an M16A1, it even has a mark for 500 yards. All known distance qualification for basic rifle marksmanship occurs in yards. True, we do BZO at 30 yards, but the trajectory of that round and how the sites are adjusted at 30 yards is equivalent to 200 yards. That is to say that whatever dope is on the weapon at 30 yards to hit a target, will remain unchanged and accurate (if target acquisition was accurately attained at 30 yards) at 200 yards. There are three known distance lines at any non-STA KD range. There is the 200 yard line, the 300 yard line and the 500 yard line. All standard, non-metric.

To further illustrate this point, one quarter turn of the Front Sight Post up or down, will move the strike of the round in inches per 100 yards, not cm per m.

Again, this is for iron sights on standard M16 rifle qualification. Scout/snipers use optics and weapons, and a different qualification and marksmanship method.

Of course, it is possible in my 15 years away from the Corps that this has all changed in which case I will willingly insert my foot in my mouth. It is interesting nonetheless.

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