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Pitchoff Chimney Cliff
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Pete's Farewell 

YDS: 5.7 French: 5a Ewbanks: 15 UIAA: V+ ZA: 13 British: MVS 4b

   
Type:  Trad, 3 pitches, 150'
Consensus:  YDS: 5.7 French: 5a Ewbanks: 15 UIAA: V+ ZA: 13 British: MVS 4b [details]
FA: Pete Gibb and Dave Gilyeat
Page Views: 7,217
Submitted By: Rafiki on Jun 28, 2007

You & This Route  |  Other Opinions (67)
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Janine on p3 of Pete's Farewell

Description 

Pete's Farewell is the Pitchoff classic!
Someone once told me the story behind the route's name. After the FA, Pete slipped off the top of the crag. Thinking Pete was dead, his partner looked over the edge to find him about 50ft below on a ledge screaming about his ankles.

Pitch 1 - Climb the 30ft easy face to a ledge. 5.2

Pitch 2 - Traverse the obvious line out left and up the dihedral to a belay next to the small pine. The lower traverse into the dihedral is slightly harder. 5.6 65ft

Pitch 3 - Walk across the ledge to an awesome handcrack and jam your way to the top. 5.7 60ft

Pitch 1 and 2 can be combined easily. To descend, move right at the top into a small cave and use the slung boulder to rap down into a chimney. There's a set of anchors at the end of the chimney on the face. You may want to stay on rappel to reach the anchors. Rap to the start of the route.


Location 

This route starts on top of the practice slab. The approach trail on the left side of the crag will bring you to this big ledge.


Protection 

Great and obvious protection the entire way. Bring a few large cams. #3-4 BD



Photos of Pete's Farewell Slideshow Add Photo
John Ciccone on the easy first pitch of Pete's Farewell.
John Ciccone on the easy first pitch of Pete's Far...
Me leading the last pitch on a cold and windy April day
Me leading the last pitch on a cold and windy Apri...
Greg leading the 2nd pitch of Pete's Farewell.
Greg leading the 2nd pitch of Pete's Farewell.
Scott Arno climbs the traverse on P2(5.6) of Pete's Farewell(5.7)
Scott Arno climbs the traverse on P2(5.6) of Pete'...
Pete's Farewell beta
BETA PHOTO: Pete's Farewell beta
Matt topping off the last pitch
Matt topping off the last pitch
John Ciccone leading the last pitch of Pete's Farewell. A full-on jam exercise.
John Ciccone leading the last pitch of Pete's Fare...
Comments on Pete's Farewell Add Comment
Show which comments
Comments displayed oldest to newestSkip Ahead to the Most Recent Dated May 14, 2014
By AGH
Jun 29, 2007

P3 is an awesome pitch with solid jams and great exposure. Plus: The amusement factor is pretty high when the tourists stop in the pulloff to rubberneck at you.

By Adam Catalano
From: Albany, New York
Apr 8, 2008

Serious about the bigger cams. You're looking at a HUGE swing onto your belayer before you get that first #4 in. I just had one with me and it was pretty exciting sliding it up as I went before I could throw in something in the #2 range.

By Michael G
Aug 28, 2009

single or double rope rap? Thanks.

By Chris Duca
Administrator
From: Havertown, PA
Aug 29, 2009
rating: 5.7+ 5a 15 V+ 13 MVS 4b

Michael,

A single 60m rope will get you to the ground from the chimney rappel station.

By Greg Kuchyt
Aug 3, 2010
rating: 5.7 5a 15 V+ 13 MVS 4b

You can acceptably protect the climb with a single rack to 3". Bring more if you want to sew any section up.

By worth russell
From: Brooklyn, NY
Jul 8, 2011

awesome climb. My favorite adirondack route this far. Stay low on the traverse, it's easier. Gaining the crack is a cool stem move. Other than that it's an exciting breeze. A truly G climb, imagine that.

By Matt Baer
Apr 12, 2012
rating: 5.7 5a 15 V+ 13 MVS 4b

Classic route in the ADK's with great views! First pitch is short but damp. The second pitch is fun I recommend traversing above the little roof system, much easier. The third pitch is really exposed and makes for a great climb!

By Drake Pregnall
From: Morehead, KY
May 22, 2012

For those of you used to the fixed gray alien cam being at the first belay, it wasn't there when i went up on saturday 5/19/12. Just beware that the belay now will eat up even more of your little gear.

By kenr
Jul 19, 2012

P3 - unless you've got rather large hands, the lower section of the crack of P3 is too wide for effective hand-jams -- but for me it went pretty easily as a layback, especially with jamming/camming my feet a little into the crack.

By Benjaminadk
From: Lake George, NY
Oct 23, 2012

Doing "The Lonely" instead of P1 and P2 of Pete's is a fun way to go. A #4 is not necessary, but i think having two #3s is a good idea for the money pitch. Great climb.

By Peter Lewis
From: Bridgton, Maine
Jan 16, 2014

I'd like to clear up a little history regarding the route name. As far as I know, the route has always been called Pete's Farewell (Pete Gibb may left the area shortly afterwards). It was certainly called that when I first climbed it back in 1979 (using the little green guidebook by Tom Rosecrans). The reference made to the falling climber in the intro here on MP has nothing to do with the name of the route. I know this because I'm the guy that took the big digger off the top. In October of 1979 I climbed "The Disputed" (which is the 5.7/8 crack directly above 1st belay on Pete's) with my college roommate, Mark Arsenault. When we got into the woods we packed up our stuff and began walking the cliff edge toward the decent gully at the west end. As we approached the point where Pete's Farewell tops out, I stepped out onto the little slab to avoid a bush, slipped on some wet moss, slid down the slab on my butt and fell off the top of the cliff. After about 30 feet (15 down the slab and another 15 in the air), I landed on both feet at the last belay for The El, my ankles rolled badly (with accompanying snapping noises), I tipped over to my left toward the hole where you begin the downclimb through the Great Chimney, and stopped. Knowing the cliff well, and the sheer drop to the talus from the top of The El, Mark assumed I was at the bottom and decided to continue his descent and go into Lake Placid to call the police. He was so certain that the fall was unsurvivable that he did not call out to me and was not going to go to the bottom of the cliff before heading into town. When I shouted his name, he freaked out a little. My friend, Alan Jolley (a longtime Daks climber) was at the cliff that day and between him and Mark they skidded my sorry butt back down to the road and we went to the hospital in Saranac Lake. So that's basically it: my name is Pete, I pitched off Pitchoff, and fared very well. The best part of the story (other than the obvious irony) is that I was 19 at the time and had never had a girlfriend. Back at school (I was a freshman at nearby Paul Smith's College), I had been watching a beautiful dark-haired girl for weeks but was too much of a goofball to even introduce myself. In the cafeteria a couple of days after my accident the girl walked by me with her tray full of dishes and I reached out with one of my crutches and tripped her (I just did it, okay, I didn't put much thought into it). Down she went amidst crashing plates and silverware and then up she got, right in my face reading me the riot act. Karen and I have married for 31 years, have two grown children, and a new granddaughter named Sophie. Whenever we go back to the Dacks, we always stop at the little pull-off below the cliff, get out, lean against the car, and look up at Pitchoff. We thank God for his grace and mercy and then I put my arm around my beautiful dark-haired wife and kiss her on the cheek.

Follow the red dots from left to right: 1) I fell off the top of this (it's about 175 feet to the ground), 2) this is where I slipped, 3) I fell off the bottom of the slab here, 4) landed here, and, 5) didn't land here. To get the full effect, see the image sequence at full size. I took these photos 33 years after my accident, after a comparatively uneventful ascent of The El.
Follow the red dots from left to right: 1) I fell off the top of this (it's about 175 feet to the ground), 2) this is where I slipped, 3) I fell off the bottom of the slab here, 4) landed here, and, 5) didn't land here. To get the full effect, see the image sequence at full size. I took these photos 33 years after my accident, after a comparatively uneventful ascent of The El.

By Peter Lewis
From: Bridgton, Maine
Jan 18, 2014

Just another goofy historical note. When I first did Pete's, back in '79, the upper crack (which was WAY too big for our #11 hexes) still sported some sections of 2x4 lumber that had been driven into it, with holes drilled in the end to run a sling through. Yes, of course we clipped them!

By rbutler
May 14, 2014

Great fun on P2!
Great fun on P2!



Awesome climb. Easy route finding, great protection and great holds. There's a black tricam on 1st belay ledge that was left on 5/12/2014 simply because we lost the nut tool. This was that pieces first weekend out so grab if you'd like, it's brand new.

Descent wasn't as bad as I imagined it would be. Pulling the rope from the slung boulder isn't bad. The second anchor is in a bit of a weird spot though. Stay on rappel to reach it, below it is open air and the ledges at the start of P1.