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Apr 17, 2012
Top of Montezuma's Tower
When I started building my rack I could only afford a set of stoppers and a set of Rockcentrics. As a result I feel like I've gotten pretty OK at placing passive pro.

Since then I have gotten a set of cams, but still find myself placing hexes if I can over a cam. But one of the guys I climb with a lot HATES hexes. When he cleans them he refuses to put them on his harness.

Just out of curiosity, how many of you guys still have hexes on your rack? Do you place your wires much, or only when a cam doesn't fit? Would you be in a Y2K type predicament if all your cams stopped working?
Tom Grummon
From Golden, CO
Joined Oct 20, 2009
33 points
Apr 17, 2012
Tour Ronde North Face
I don't use hexes, but I use stoppers and tricams constantly. Kai Larson
From Sandy, Utah
Joined Jan 6, 2006
260 points
Apr 17, 2012
Tom Grummon wrote:
When he cleans them he refuses to put them on his harness

So... does he toss them off the route for you to retrieve in the brush later?
Boissal
From Small Lake, UT
Joined Aug 21, 2006
1,713 points
Apr 17, 2012
World Champion NY Giants logo
I just sold my hexes. Still use tri-cams and stoppers. Cams don't replace stopers in most situations. Cams are usually faster to place and faster to clean then hexs. More importantly, they don't sound like cow bells. In the end, they are all safe, so use what you like. Sergio P
From Idaho Springs, CO
Joined Oct 23, 2004
237 points
Apr 17, 2012
Thunderbolt Peak in the Palisades
I take a few of the larger hexes when alpine climbing. They allow me to have ďdoublesĒ on my rack without too much extra weight. They are also very good bail pieces as a hex only costs $10 compared to a cam. Thatís really the only time they get used unless Iím playing around at my local trad practice area (Sespe Gorge in Ojai.) Most of the time Iím trying to push my grade in places like JTree and Tuolumne and want doubles of cams. Thereís nothing wrong with hexes, some people have just gotten spoiled by using nothing but cams with a few nuts here and there. randy88fj62
Joined May 28, 2010
67 points
Apr 17, 2012
Self portrait on the summit of Gray's Peak, CO
I started my rack out the same way and got some practice placing passive pro. Invaluable experience. I mostly do wires, but hexes occasionally. The big difference I've noticed betweeen a hex and a cam of the same size, is that if the hex is placed solid, it doesn't seem to walk like cams do sometimes as a result of rope movement, etc. The variable range of cams sure is nice. I also try to save the cams for anchors for this reason. If I see a good placement for a wire, I'll plug one of those first.
Walt Barker
From Reno NV
Joined Dec 16, 2010
322 points
Apr 17, 2012
25' drop...wheeeeee!
When I see a good nut placement, I plug a nut. To me, a good nut placement beats a good cam placement any day (especially those DMM offsets in an inward-flaring crack...mmm). That said, I probably use cams for about 60% of my placements, because I trust a cam in a slightly-less-than-ideal placement over a nut in a slightly-less-than-ideal placement (that is, a cam has a slightly wider margin of error) and they tend to go in faster. I do sometimes carry hexes (torque nuts), but mostly use them for anchors when I can (save the cams for the climb). Slung hexes do allow for some pretty creative placements that you can't really get with any other gear. Cheap bail gear, too. JesseT
From Portland, OR
Joined May 5, 2011
114 points
Apr 17, 2012
nut placements skills are crucial IMO ... the better you are at those, the less weight youll need to carry, and perhaps save the cams for the cruxes

i never saw the point in hexes, tricams work better for the smaller sizes, and unless yr doing alpine, large cams are better as you can bump em up on offwidths ... try placing a hex one handed on a pumpy stance ... and youll quickly find something else

the people who i see with hexes and rave about em are usually on more moderate alpine/ice/mixed routes where they make more sense ... or climb at a quite moderate level where the stances are good

there a reason why some believe that friend were the secret weapon when they were introduced ;)
bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
2,053 points
Apr 17, 2012
Top of Montezuma's Tower
Boissal wrote:
So... does he toss them off the route for you to retrieve in the brush later?


He's threatened to. He lets them dangle on the rope (which seems like more of a hassle).
Tom Grummon
From Golden, CO
Joined Oct 20, 2009
33 points
Apr 17, 2012
Typically you can get away without hexes. But for me, lately I've begun racking 2 of them on my rack, usually mid to larger sized. I do this for anchoring to not eat up my cam, the weight, and also the crappy irregular crack that just dont take cams well. Variety is the spice of life... and climbing. Pete Spri
Joined Jun 1, 2009
139 points
Apr 17, 2012
About half way up the East Arete on Illumination R...
Tom Grummon wrote:
He's threatened to. He lets them dangle on the rope (which seems like more of a hassle).


Sounds like a doosh.

Nothing wrong with hexes... Guys don't like them because they're old school, and placement-for-placement, cams can go pretty much anywhere hexes can. But their weight-to-usefulness ratio is actually really high- You can more than double the amount of pro you can carry for the same weight, replacing cams with hexes, on long alpine routes where every ounce counts.
Ben Beckerich
From saint helens, oregon
Joined Jun 24, 2011
266 points
Apr 17, 2012
Indy pass
Ben B. wrote:
Sounds like a doosh. Nothing wrong with hexes... Guys don't like them because they're old school, and placement-for-placement, cams can go pretty much anywhere hexes can. But their weight-to-usefulness ratio is actually really high- You can more than double the amount of pro you can carry for the same weight, replacing cams with hexes, on long alpine routes where every ounce counts.


I also feel that some people love on them because they're old-school, too.
Jason N.
From Grand Junction
Joined Mar 18, 2011
23 points
Apr 17, 2012
The wife and I road-trippin on the Connie.
I have an old set of slung hexes. I don't carry them often, usually only when we're climbing on just my rack (my partner isn't contributing any gear) and I want to have doubles in large sizes. That said, even though i hardly carry them, I feel more confident about a well placed hex than any other gear.

Edit to add - However, I only carry 7-10 (BD, slung), the smaller wired ones are crap, tricams and nuts are more usefull in those sizes.
Larry S
From Easton, Pennsylvania
Joined May 28, 2010
921 points
Apr 17, 2012
About half way up the East Arete on Illumination R...
Jason N. wrote:
I also feel that some people love on them because they're old-school, too.


I don't get too concerned until I see a sticht plate hanging off a guy's harness...
Ben Beckerich
From saint helens, oregon
Joined Jun 24, 2011
266 points
Apr 17, 2012
J-Tree
I started climbing before SLCDs using a rack of stoppers and wavy Clog hexes that seemed to fall out at every opportunity! I upgraded to some fancy Chouinard hexes, but I always hated hexes and loved stoppers. We used some big stoppers in the 70's slung with 8 mm perlon. When rigid Friends came out my climbing partners and I each bought one of a different size. I never looked back, I still hate hexes. However, I will still reach for a small stopper over a small cam most of the time. I often carry a few Tricams to double up usually using them at belays.
I do confess to some curiosity about modern curved hexes like the Metolius, but have not tried them.
David Houston
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Nov 18, 2001
184 points
Apr 17, 2012
Top of Jah-Man Sister Superior
My Standard Rack consists of nuts and cams with a few small tricams. That being said I still keep a a set of hexes around for when I want to go lighter. Its fun to mix it up and climb not using cams sometimes. I think Hexes are invaluable when it comes to teaching large placements. I think if you get hexes down cam placements are easier to see.
Dallen
Sunny-D
From SLC, Utah
Joined Aug 2, 2006
460 points
Apr 17, 2012
Monkey Face - Smith Rock OR
In my experience:

1) Not all hexes are created equal. The flat sided BD hexes are the least versatile in my opinion. +1 for wired WC Rockcentrics.

2) The type of rock you climb on will dictate the usefulness of hexes. Highly featured cracks are poor for cams because they will walk out of the intended placement. Hexes tend to stay put in such rock.

3) Harder cracks generally want more cams because they are less featured and you need something fast.

4) The larger hexes are most useful and are a great way to keep your rack weight down for long routes.

Tell your partner to lighten up.
Cruxic
From Corvallis, OR
Joined May 27, 2011
16 points
Apr 17, 2012
First summit of First Flatiron
It very much depends on the route for me but I place my offset stoppers and tricams a TON. I seem to "save" my cams for when I need something, but I don't really climb hard enough that I'm ever in that spot. I also try to build my anchors out of passive gear more often than not.

Just as an example, we did a longer ~1000' route in the flatirons 2 weeks ago and I think I only placed maybe 5 cams total, the rest were tricams and stoppers. I like it that way.
Derek W
Joined Jun 27, 2008
38 points
Apr 17, 2012
The rappel off the Maiden, Boulder, CO 9/27/11
Cruxic and Derek +1

When I started trad I only had passive protection. You get some funny looks from all those "new school hipsters" but in my opinion its way better to learn to place passive protection than just jam a cam in whenever.

Tell your bro if he doesn't like your gear, then he can bring his own stuff and lead the climbs. I'm sure you wont be threatening to drop his shit, or maybe you should.... cause he sounds like a dousche.

To all the hex/tricam haters out there.....

I have a fever.... and you know what the cure is?

More Cowbell.
BameR
From golden, co
Joined Apr 8, 2011
102 points
Apr 17, 2012
Bocan
I don't really care to carry hexes for anything other than alpine, but when I do. I use them for the belay.

Love tricams...have yet to place a single stopper in the flatirons. Someday maybe.
Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Joined Feb 15, 2006
942 points
Apr 17, 2012
on my rack I keep the BD 7-10 hexes to save weight on the bigger sized cams. They always feel better to me then a cam does so if I can get one in easy I do so. Also if I ever have to bail I know what im leaving. ian watson
From Albuquerque, NM
Joined Apr 27, 2010
275 points
Apr 17, 2012
Top of Montezuma's Tower
I know I can't place a hex as fast as a cam, that was readily apparent a few weeks ago at turkey rocks when I had already placed my #3 and was only left with a hex for the crux (poor planning I know, I was just too excited to place my shiny new #3). But I'm glad I at least had a hex, seeing as I don't have doubles. Tom Grummon
From Golden, CO
Joined Oct 20, 2009
33 points
Apr 17, 2012
David Sahalie wrote:
i don't see people with racks of hexes at the IC. jus sayin.


Really? That's all I climb with down there. A quadruple set and a wall hammer, that way I can get them in nice and snug.
Mitch Musci
From Fort Collins, CO
Joined Apr 8, 2002
702 points
Apr 17, 2012
Straight up from here. One big reach then great le...
Passsive climbing is a great way to be a badass. Cams ARE a great innovation for harder routes or for when you find yourself having to place blind. Personally I think alot of people dont like passive gear because it requires more strength, endurance, and technique, then plug and go climbing. Know that you are more of a badass than him and have fun man! Troyd
From Chicago, IL
Joined Aug 21, 2011
143 points
Apr 17, 2012
Axes glistening in the sun
Really piss him off and get tricams. I love tricams. I learned by strictly setting nuts and hexes. THe guy I learned from was ole' school.By the time I got to use a cam it was like damn this is sweet!
I guess it was a cool thing. Anyone can set a cam, but it takes skill and finesse to set nuts and hexes to where they can hold. Tricams take some finesse to, but man they can be a bitch to get out.
"H"
From Manitou Springs
Joined Feb 13, 2006
59 points
Apr 18, 2012
HBL wrote:
I love tricams.


x2
ian watson
From Albuquerque, NM
Joined Apr 27, 2010
275 points


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