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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Feb 4, 2014
After climbing in Joshua Tree with some hour long approaches carrying a large, old, heavy backpack that's suitable for 2+ week backpacking trips, I realize I need something smaller/lighter/more modern.

I think to fit my needs I probably need two packs. So far I like Arcteryx Cierzo 18 ( arcteryx.com/product.aspx?language=EN&gender=Mens&model=Cier>>> ) and Arcteryx Miura 45 ( arcteryx.com/product.aspx?model=Miura-45&language=EN ). The thought is to have one for sport climbing that can carry a rope or quickdraws (split that gear between partners), misc gear such as cord/biners, as well as food, first aid, jacket, and possibly harness/shoes. The other would be larger to carry top roping gear or trad gear plus the aforementioned stuff minus the quickdraws.

I'm looking for: works well for stuffing/unpacking climbing gear, stable on the body for safer approaches/descents (hip and sternum straps), as light as possible without sacrificing durability.

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By Kai Larson
From Sandy, Utah
Feb 4, 2014
Tour Ronde North Face
Patagonia Ascensionist

www.patagonia.com/us/product/ascensionist-pack-35-liter?p=47>>>

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By Alicia Sokolowski
From Brooklyn, NY
Feb 4, 2014
Hanging out waiting for Die Antwoord to come on stage
My guy is in lurve with this one:

www.cilogear.com/30lws.html

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By Muscrat
Feb 4, 2014
The one for me
www.mammut.ch/en/productDetail/251002221_v_0550_357/Trion-Pr>>>
Just awesome perfect, the only thing better is a partner who carries it all. Which i had; where are you Andy?

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By The Stoned Master
Administrator
From Pennsylvania
Feb 4, 2014
Day Lily.
Muscrat says: The one for me
www.mammut.ch/en/productDetail/251002221_v_0550_357/Trion-Pr>>>

+1. There are a TON of great packs given what youre looking for. I do love the Trion however, one of my all time favorites: its a workhorse for sure.

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By ze_dirtbag
From TBD
Feb 4, 2014
cottonmouth
+1 for the cilo. i picked up the guide tho, it's a touch heavier, but it's reinforced where my other one blew out.

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By csproul
From Rancho Cordova, CA
Feb 4, 2014
Summit of Wolf's Head with Pingora in the background
Love my CIlo worksack, but not sure it's what I'd pick for slogging around someplace as abrasive as Josh. I'd go with something more durable.

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By NC Rock Climber
From The Oven, AKA Phoenix
Feb 4, 2014
tanuki
I have a CCW for sale.

mountainproject.com/v/fs---cold-cold-world-chernobyl/1086318>>>

CCW is not the lightest (go Cilo for that) or the most durable (try a haulbag), but it is very light and durable, carries great and will last for MANY years. I use the Cilo GS 30:30, but think that is is only slightly better than the CCW.

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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Feb 4, 2014
I like the look of the Mammut Trion. 30L (see Cilo Worksack) sounds like a smallish pack coming from a guy who has been known to fill a giant backpack to the brim. Is 30L enough for a full trad rack or a lot of tope rope gear (webbing, hexes, nuts, cams, rope, etc...)?

The Miura 45 has a really sweet way of packing and unpacking, which makes it look really good for easy approaches with lots of gear. It looks like the Mammut Trion would be better for climbing. I would intend to do an approach with a pack this big, but I wouldn't plan on roped climbing with it.

I still think a small pack will be good to have for packing really light on difficult approaches or days when I don't need much gear. Anyone else use more than one pack?

Joshua Tree was just an example. I live in Minnesota, but I took a trip out there and really suffered with my huge pack. I borrowed my girlfriend's pack one day and saw the light of light packs. The place did make me realize durability matters when scrambling on boulders or chimneying. I just want a pack or two that's lighter for faster/safer moving around so that I can get more climbs in per day.

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By bearbreeder
Feb 4, 2014
The most impotant thing in a pack is fit, fit and fit

If it doesnt fit nothing else matters

Any decent pack that fits im the 30-40l range will work .... As long as it fits ...

Try on packs with the gear you will carry ... And walk around

Only you back can tell you what works best, not the intrawebs

;)

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By Ryan Hill
From Oakland, CA
Feb 4, 2014
Kyle Robson wrote:
I still think a small pack will be good to have for packing really light on difficult approaches or days when I don't need much gear. Anyone else use more than one pack? Joshua Tree was just an example. I live in Minnesota, but I took a trip out there and really suffered with my huge pack. I borrowed my girlfriend's pack one day and saw the light of light packs. The place did make me realize durability matters when scrambling on boulders or chimneying. I just want a pack or two that's lighter for faster/safer moving around so that I can get more climbs in per day.


As far as the Muira goes, my climbing partner has one and I hate it for any real approach. It is heavy and wide, making it difficult to carry through tight and bushy trails.

I climb with two different packs. A 35L Sabre from Lowe Alpine and an 18 or 20L daypack from Mountain Hardwear. The Sabre is awesome! Rugged, lightweight, simple, and holds a rope, rock, and day's worth of gear with ease. If I am leaving a pack at the bottom of the climb I bring the Sabre, if it is a walk-off and I'm not returning to the bottom then I bring the daypack. Backpack the rope, wear my harness, and put cams and other gear in the pack. I haven't seen any system that works better for the climbing I do.

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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Feb 4, 2014
Thanks, Ryan. That's really good to know. Nothing more frustrating than getting snagged on shrubbery.

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By MRock
Feb 4, 2014
Split shin after 5.9+ R lead
www.hyperlitemountaingear.com/packs.html

So comfy, such lightness

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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Feb 4, 2014
One feature I'm realizing I really like is the ability to open a pack like a suitcase. I.e. it opens from more than the top (usually the back or the front). I hate unstuffing a pack completely to get the rope from the bottom, re-stuff it, and then eventually need to repeat the process for something else. And then when the rope is done (potentially when moving to a new climb), once again unstuffing to re-stuff the rope.

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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Feb 5, 2014
Just watched a video review of the Miura 50. That's exactly what I want... Now to somehow find it on sale.

Only downside of the 50 is it's like double the weight of the 45. But the 50 holds a lot (e.g. a double rack and a rope plus misc gear), it fits the Pali rope bag perfectly in the bottom, it has a roll top/clamshell opening, and it looks like it fits very securely on the body.

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By rgold
From Poughkeepsie, NY
Feb 5, 2014
The traverse out to the Yellow Ridge on the Dogstick Ridge link-up.  Photo by Myriam Bouchard
Kyle Robson wrote:
Just watched a video review of the Miura 50. That's exactly what I want... Now to somehow find it on sale. Only downside of the 50 is it's like double the weight of the 45. But the 50 holds a lot (e.g. a double rack and a rope plus misc gear), it fits the Pali rope bag perfectly in the bottom, it has a roll top/clamshell opening, and it looks like it fits very securely on the body.


I have one of the Miura 50's. It's fantastic for cragging, super comfortable and the full opening makes life so much easier. I don't buy the snagging in the bushes bit really, any 45-50L pack is going to do that to some extent. Underbrush catches on stuff. It is heavy compared to some other packs (I also have a 60L Cilogear worksack) but it stands up to a hell of a lot more abuse than lightly constructed packs, especially abuse from the inside if you are carrying a rack around in it. (All my light packs have holes in them punched by rock gear.)

You absolutely wouldn't want to take it up a climb. It isn't an alpine pack or a multi-day camping pack. It is fine to haul things to the base of a route and leave there. But primarily it is a cragging pack, meaning that you envision doing multiple routes, walking from one to the other. If you do a lot of that, then the Miura is unsurpassed. Otherwise, something more versatile would be the way to go.

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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Feb 6, 2014
Maybe he was talking about the Miura 45. It seems wider at the top. I think it's probably going to be best for me to get a pack like the Miura 50 which is still significantly lighter than my oldschool backpack (probably 70+ liters with a heavy internal frame) while also being tough and well suited to the relatively safe and short to medium approaches usually found in Minnesota. Then when I go on a trip next I may consider a 30-40L pack that's lighter and fits the body better and forget the clamshell opening features.

P.S. I looked at the Cierzo 18 in person, and it's too small for half the gear to sport climb unless the rope is outside a pack or in someone else's larger pack. It was on clearance, though, so I bought it as a gym bag.

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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Feb 12, 2014


Kai, thanks for that recommendation. I got the Patagonia Ascensionist and plan to use that whenever I can. I haven't received it yet, but I'm guessing with the rope packed on the outside, 35L will hold a fair amount of gear. I chose it because it's very light weight and has shoulder and hip straps. It also looks relatively easy to pack and unpack.

I still anticipate getting a 50L bag (for carrying a rope and a double rack or a rope plus top rope anchoring gear). Still trying to find a Miura 50. I emailed Arcteryx asking if they plan to bring the old design back, and they said no. What a bummer. An updated Miura 50 that's lighter while maintaining a real suspension and the old style panel loading would be awesome.

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By Rob Warden, Space Lizard
From Springdale Ut
Feb 13, 2014
blah
I have a Muria 50L it is a fabulous pack, the 45L is not going to offer the same support or capacity or I assume longevity as the 50L. I have only handled the new one but the lack of suspension and the lack of a real hip-belt is frustrating and a disincentive to buy. if you were only carrying a sport rack or a single set not very far than it would be fine. however, the zippers are a smaller gauge and less likely to survive over filling, the material is thin, and although the zipper system is interesting. I doubt it will be more functional than a huge clam-shell that zips open, carries a 70m and doubles with aplomb.

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By Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Mar 3, 2014
FINALLY got the Miura 50. I've been watching craigslist, ebay, and this site like a hawk for a month! $180 in "used twice" condition off ebay. I also really like the Patagonia Ascensionist. I'll use the Ascensionist for situations where 35L is enough and the approach is somewhat long or includes scrambling. Thanks again for the advice.

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By Lee Green
Mar 5, 2014
Check out Deuter packs. Very well made and well thought out. The Guide 45+ that I use is comfortable, versatile, and well suited for hut-to-hut backcountry skiing in the winter and climbing in the summer.

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