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Normal rack for first flatiron
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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
Taking some advice and will be headed to the first flatiron tomorrow to do the direct route I think. Here's my full rack right now (just protection):

set of 16 stoppers
Tricams (2 pink, 1 red, 1 brown, 1 blue, 1 green)
Cams:
2 #1 mastercams
1 #2 mastercam
1 yellow alien
2 #3 mastercams
1 #.5 Camalot
1 #4 mastercam
2 orange aliens
1 #2 DMM Dragon (green)
1 #3 DMM Dragon (red)
1 #1 Camalot
1 Purple alien
2 #2 Camalots
1 Clear alien
2 #3 Camalots
1 #6 DMM Dragon (Grey)
1 #4 Camalot

If you had this rack, what would you want to take on the direct route? I can handle having a few extra pieces of gear, but not wanting to take the full rack

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By Kevin Landolt
From Fort Collins, Wyoming
Apr 11, 2011
I'm interested what people think of a "normal rack for the first flatiron" as well.

I'm going to grab a beer, sit back, and read all the constructive criticism you're about to recieve.

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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
Kevin Landolt wrote:
I'm interested what people think of a "normal rack for the first flatiron" as well. I'm going to grab a beer, sit back, and read all the constructive criticism you're about to recieve.


Why criticism? It was just a question about what rack people take on a specific climb

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By Evan1984
Apr 11, 2011
I'd go light.

5 or so cams-.5-2 ish sized although there is a step down on the final pitch of the ridge that is super easy but consequential for the second that takes a #3. Place the three and tell your second to clean it after doing the step down.

and a set of stoppers. Some slings and cordalettes.

Why is everyone laughing. That's light for me.

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By Rich Farnham
Apr 11, 2011
How comfortable do expect to be on the route? There isn't a lot of gear up there on a lot of the sections. If you think you are going to be a little gripped 20 feet (or 30, or 40) from your last piece on 5.6 friction, then you may want a larger rack. It seems counter-intuitive to take a larger rack when there isn't much gear, but my point is that the placements can be a little weird on the 1st, so you may want to have more options to make sure you can get a piece before launching off in search of the next piece.

I've never taken tri-cams up there, but suspect they might be a good piece that would go where others wouldn't. I have noticed that a bigger piece (#4 Camalot) can be useful in a few places. A lot of the flakes on the face seem to have pretty large cracks behind them. Take a cordelette as well -- there are many features that can be slung for an anchor.

I'd probably only take a single set of cams to a #3 Camalot, and a set of stoppers. But I also solo the face, and know the route well, including where good anchor locations are. I'm not trying to brag about soloing the first -- pretty much the entire population of boulder solos that thing, and most of them faster than me, and in running shoes. I'm just trying to give you something to compare to.

I've seen people haul massive racks up that thing. I even saw a guy drag a #6 Camalot. I think that's overkill, but if that's what it takes for you to be comfortable, do it.

Have fun. It's a great climb.

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By Phil Lauffen
From The Bubble
Apr 11, 2011
RMNP skiing. Photo by Nodin de Saillan
Take the stoppers and the tricams.

Single set from .5-3 camalots.

You won't be able to find much else.

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By Phil Lauffen
From The Bubble
Apr 11, 2011
RMNP skiing. Photo by Nodin de Saillan
And don't believe people like me who try to scare you halfway up, soloing by, asking: "How much do some of those ropey things cost?"

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By Sergio P
From Idaho Springs, CO
Apr 11, 2011
World Champion NY Giants logo
If you lead 5.10 trad as your profile states, then you can cut your listed rack in half. The 1st is way easier then Kor Flake (you listed that as your favorite climb). Although the route is run-out the climbing is so easy you'll rarely realize how far below your last piece is.

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By Buff Johnson
Apr 11, 2011
smiley face
I heard they put a jacuzzi and a wet bar in at the false summit; do you guys happen to know if they carry MacAllen? If not, you may need to add to your list of gadgets.


I like to also have some webbing for any flatiron and a 60M rope is good for me.

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By MikeyC
Apr 11, 2011
I did this route last weekend for my first time. I am a new trad leader. I have a rather sparse rack but never found it to be lacking on the direct route. I have a set of power cams from #1 through #6 and a #1, #2, #3 BD c4's and a set of stoppers. I didn't use much of anything on the first and second pitches but after that I was able to get a decent amount of gear in when I felt it was necessary. For what its worth I thought it was a really fun climb and certainly not difficult enough to warrant worrying about my gear too much.

-Mike

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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
Phil Lauffen wrote:
And don't believe people like me who try to scare you halfway up, soloing by, asking: "How much do some of those ropey things cost?"


Haha I'll never understand how people have the balls to solo, no matter how easy the route. Good for them and you, but I'm fine with my protection.

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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
Sergio P wrote:
If you lead 5.10 trad as your profile states, then you can cut your listed rack in half. The 1st is way easier then Kor Flake (you listed that as your favorite climb). Although the route is run-out the climbing is so easy you'll rarely realize how far below your last piece is.


Yep, hardest route I've done was a 10a, though I was massively uncomfortable the whole time I was doing it. I'm completely comfortable in the 9 range.

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By cheifitj
From Boulder, Colorado
Apr 11, 2011
Casual Route Pitch 3  Photo by Mark Cushman
Evan Sanders wrote:
Yep, hardest route I've done was a 10a, though I was massively uncomfortable the whole time I was doing it. I'm completely comfortable in the 9 range.



If you are comfy in the 9 range, cut your rack in half, you don't need any doubles.

Set of nuts, pink, red and brown tri cam, a couple of cams, .5-3 and maybe one or two smaller ones. The hardest pitch to me has always been the first and the only gear is the eye bolt anyways. Save the weight and bring an extra jacket as it may be cold tomorrow.

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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
cheifitj wrote:
If you are comfy in the 9 range, cut your rack in half, you don't need any doubles. Set of nuts, pink, red and brown tri cam, a couple of cams, .5-3 and maybe one or two smaller ones. The hardest pitch to me has always been the first and the only gear is the eye bolt anyways. Save the weight and bring an extra jacket as it may be cold tomorrow.


Cool, will do. How's the line, is it relatively straight or will I need to load up on the runners?

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By J. Thompson
From denver, co
Apr 11, 2011
Trundling a death block. Photo by Dan Gambino.
Evan Sanders wrote:
Cool, will do. How's the line, is it relatively straight or will I need to load up on the runners?


If you can keep from getting off route your first time up I'll give you a dollar.

Bring alot of runners.

josh

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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
J. Thompson wrote:
If you can keep from getting off route your first time up I'll give you a dollar. Bring alot of runners. josh


Why is it so easy to get off route?

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By J Antin
From Denver, CO
Apr 11, 2011
First morning at Indian Creek!!!
cheifitj wrote:
If you are comfy in the 9 range, cut your rack in half, you don't need any doubles. Set of nuts, pink, red and brown tri cam, a couple of cams, .5-3 and maybe one or two smaller ones. The hardest pitch to me has always been the first and the only gear is the eye bolt anyways. Save the weight and bring an extra jacket as it may be cold tomorrow.


+1

Evan,

Your climbing ability and level of comfort with regards to run-out have alot to do with your question.

If you are indeed "breaking into" 5.10 gear routes, you will have no trouble at all with the moves on the direct route on the 1st Flatiron. With that said, I recently climbed that same route and was very comfortable with the following rack:

1 full set of stoppers
1 60M cord (gets you down the west face from the summit in one rap)
#1 C4
#2 C4
#3 C4
2 QD's
4 AD's
2 double length Runners (great for the natural pro available)
2 Cordelettes
2-4 lockers



Let us know how the trip goes!

J

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By Jeremy Kasmann
From Denver, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Evan Sanders wrote:
Why is it so easy to get off route?


It is a big hunk of rock with many possible paths. Identify the major route features and follow them and it isn't a big deal.

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By Guy H.
From Fort Collins CO
Apr 11, 2011
Once you have Black, you will fear to go back...
I would throw in a set of Aliens or TCU's for the 2nd pitch. There is not alot of gear on that pitch without them. One set of cams and nuts should be more than enough.

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By Shawn Mitchell
From Broomfield
Apr 11, 2011
Splitter Jams on the Israel/Palestine Security Wal...
cheifitj wrote:
The hardest pitch to me has always been the first and the only gear is the eye bolt anyways.


There are various paths after the second eyebolt, one of them affording a little more protection. If you go straight or even drift right on the rib after the second clip, then you'll run it all the way to the belay and have to traverse left to get there, looking at a long, long way down if you step on a grape. If, after the clip, you move up and left across the trough, you can plug a solid #3 cam behind the flake and the runout is only long instead of absurd.

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By cheifitj
From Boulder, Colorado
Apr 11, 2011
Casual Route Pitch 3  Photo by Mark Cushman
Shawn Mitchell wrote:
There are various paths after the second eyebolt, one of them affording a little more protection. If you go straight or even drift right on the rib after the second clip, then you'll run it all the way to the belay and have to traverse left to get there, looking at a long, long way down if you step on a grape. If, after the clip, you move up and left across the trough, you can plug a solid #3 cam behind the flake and the runout is only long instead of absurd.



I guess I will have to go left some next time.

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By Shawn Mitchell
From Broomfield
Apr 11, 2011
Splitter Jams on the Israel/Palestine Security Wal...
Also, because of the low angle and importance of your feet, the Flatirons are good climbs to rack on your harness rather than a gear sling. I'm a gear sling guy and most the way on the Flats, I'm more comfortable soloing than leading, because the gear hangs down and in front of you, obstructing sight of your feet and getting in the way.

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By mountainmicah83
From Colorado Springs
Apr 11, 2011
Kit Carson
Like everyone has said, take what you are comfortable with.

I was in town with a light alpine rack after bailing off of a peak a few weeks back and decided to go for this with my partner in our tennis shoes.

Our largest piece was a #1 C4, we had the pink, red, blue, and brown tricams, #4 and #5 metolius power cams, every other size from a rack of camp nuts, 4 single length runners, and 4 double length runners. We never ran out of gear or felt like we needed anything larger.

Good luck with your climb.

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By J mac
Apr 11, 2011
Zermatt
Don't sweat it too much, if you are ok on the first pitch to the second bolt you will be fine on the rest of the route. The first two bolts are far apart on friction climbing with no gear inbetween (it's only 5.6 though!). After the second bolt take a hard left to the obvious flake (most people go straight, then left with little to no gear)that will take plenty of gear. The rest of the route will take more than enough gear and is substainally easier than the start. Remeber you are comfortably on your feet the whole time!

Start looking for a belay with plenty of rope left, as somtimes they are a bit hard to find.

I placed a number #3 camalot on every pitch!

I place gear every 2ft on an eldo 5.9 and had no problems with the run-outs on the first!

Have fun!

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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
AntinJ wrote:
+1 Evan, Your climbing ability and level of comfort with regards to run-out have alot to do with your question. If you are indeed "breaking into" 5.10 gear routes, you will have no trouble at all with the moves on the direct route on the 1st Flatiron. With that said, I recently climbed that same route and was very comfortable with the following rack: 1 full set of stoppers 1 60M cord (gets you down the west face from the summit in one rap) #1 C4 #2 C4 #3 C4 2 QD's 4 AD's 2 double length Runners (great for the natural pro available) 2 Cordelettes 2-4 lockers Let us know how the trip goes! J


I will! I don't do much friction climbing, so those portions of the climb will be interesting, but really fun.

Here's another sort of side question-having not done much friction climbing, I'm not really sure what shoes would be best. I only have 2 pairs of shoes (both are which just slightly oversized bouldering shoes, I walked around in them to take the downturn out for trad climbing) and I'm not really sure which ones would be best for this type of climb. I have a pair of 5.10 V10s and La sportiva miura VS. Both have relatively the same comfort level (although sometime I slip off the heel in between pitches). Which pair of shoes would make the better friction climbing shoe?

Oh and I think I've settled on taking eight cams, #1 MC through The #6 Dragon cam, a full set of nuts, and the pink and red tricams. Thanks for the tips everybody.

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By Julius Beres
From Boulder, CO
Apr 11, 2011
Rewritten
cheifitj wrote:
If you are comfy in the 9 range, cut your rack in half, you don't need any doubles. Set of nuts, pink, red and brown tri cam, a couple of cams, .5-3 and maybe one or two smaller ones. The hardest pitch to me has always been the first and the only gear is the eye bolt anyways. Save the weight and bring an extra jacket as it may be cold tomorrow.


+1. I might suggest leaving the #3 at home and taking the 0.4 instead. Don't bother doubling any cam size or bringing anything huge (eg, the #4). I've placed tricams, others hate them. I would say 5 cams, nuts, and 3 tricams is as much as you will need. Maybe a half dozen slings. There are definitely flakes and other things you can sling too, where you don't need any pro at all.

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