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night bouldering
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By dlasley
Apr 27, 2013
just climbing
I want to get a work light for night bouldering. I'm tired of all this headlamp stuff. Any suggestions?

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By BGreen
From Del Norte, CO
Apr 27, 2013
amazon.com/Dual-Light-Stand-Re...

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By matthewWallace
From plymouth, nh
Apr 28, 2013
Cool movement on this line
dewalt.com/tools/cordless-ligh...

Thats what we use, buy an extra battery and you should be able to get 3-4 hours of use out of it

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By Derek Wehrle
Aug 5, 2013
My buddy has one of those clay/ceramic backyard firepits. Sometimes we will pull it off of its metal stand, and carefully load it into the back of a truck, and have a contained fire at our local bouldering area. Obviously take extreme care to ensure the pit is placed in a safe place, and nothing is left behind.

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By Morgan Patterson
Administrator
Aug 5, 2013
Topo - Cliffs in Green
This guy is the standard for us. I've tried the other Coleman lanterns and this is really the only one that I've found built to last and doesn't leak propane. The LED stuff is def interesting... no experience.

Coleman Propane Lantern


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By Donald Kerabatsos
Aug 5, 2013
Coleman LED

Works awesome. Splits up so you can illuminate twice as much space. You can get a battery and charger as well as use D batteries. Very bright. Expensive though. They also make a for lantern set up. Never used it or seen it but I assume it would work as well.

Also, check out landscape lighting at super-marts. You can get cheap LED lighting that do surprisingly well.

Another thing that can work great in certain spots is a space blanket. Put it up so the silver side reflects towards the rocks and you can really spread out your lighting and get a much broader, softer light. Point a few headlamps/ flashlights toward the blanket. You need trees or rocks or bushes to drape thee blanket across though.

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By Abram Herman
From Golden, CO
Aug 5, 2013
Viking helmet cover, yep.
Derek Wehrle wrote:
My buddy has one of those clay/ceramic backyard firepits. Sometimes we will pull it off of its metal stand, and carefully load it into the back of a truck, and have a contained fire at our local bouldering area. Obviously take extreme care to ensure the pit is placed in a safe place, and nothing is left behind.


"Tired of dealing with the hassle of headlamps? You'll LOVE the convenience of a chimenea!!" ;-)

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By ABB
Aug 5, 2013
Night owls, consider the impact of your bright lights on the wildlife, other visitors, management policies and future 'night access'. Night-access is a real issue. If it hasn't yet been dealt with via policy in your local playground, it's blinking bright on the radar of many, many land managers...and visitors who espouse 'look but don't touch' style of management. Tread lightly and dimly...this coming from a fellow night owl.

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By WadeM
Aug 5, 2013
Ultimate Squeeze
i use my mtn bike lights

just be careful that they dont over heat

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By Donald Kerabatsos
Aug 6, 2013
You have any examples of this being a 'real issue'?

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By Josh Schutz
From Estes Park and Telluride, Colo
Aug 6, 2013
Morning Glory Arch
I use an old 1940s Dietz oil lamp, filed with citronella oil for the mosquitos.

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By ABB
Aug 19, 2013
Donald Kerabatsos wrote:
You have any examples of this being a 'real issue'?


Yes, but I don't think calling attention to it here does my local issue any favors. You have any public lands you climb on, especially city or state parks? Call your land managers. Ask them what they think of bright lights for nightime climbing...if it would be a problem if many others did the same...and what might have to occur before they impose regs restricting night use, or at least restrict bright lights and noise. Talking and cheering-section hollering is noise to animals and other users, day or night. Better yet, don't call your land manager. Don't call their attention to it over the phone or on the rocks.

The people who complain about these matters aren't knocking on the doors of 'The Friends of (fill-in fav climbing area)' or The Access Fund. No, they, some with veins popping, go to land managers and elected officials and demand results. Ideas are kicked around, sometimes there's a comment period, and then you have more regulation. Reversing regs, if possible, is an ordeal. A major ordeal.

The age-old theme is that climbers don't often recognize the problem until it has precipitated restrictions, proposed or otherwise. In a word, it comes down to awareness - awareness of 'my' impact.

I'm all for moonlit action, low lights and low voices. We don't want to see or hear each other from afar, do we?

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By Jonathon Braud
From denver, co
Aug 28, 2013
Climbing at Wall Street, Moab. Pinhead Trad 5.10b
Check out the black diamond Titan lantern. Runs off 4-D batteries (which can get pricey to keep fresh). Its got 200 lumens and is what I use along with a headlamp. Gemini lights make some really powerful lights that are rechargeable, but also pricey.

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By Joe L 82
From PA
Aug 29, 2013
Go pick up some outdoor garden type solar LED lights. Just set them in the sun until you need to use them, they will last all night. 3 of them only costs a little bit and should give you more than enough lighting and you never need to buy batteries, completely weather proof as well.
I often buy these instead of actual flash lights any more. I hate dealing with batteries and these are awesome. especially for power outages as well.

cheers,
joe

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By Legs Magillicutty
From Littleton
Aug 29, 2013
Function over fashion.  My newest pair of climbing...
Best solution ever:


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By Morgan Patterson
Administrator
Aug 29, 2013
Topo - Cliffs in Green
The moon is awesome - I agree - unless you live anywhere with these pesky things they call trees and another ting, clouds!

So here's a good break down on the brightness. Looks like the LED's fall pretty far behind other options.

Dewalt DC020: 2700 lumens
Coleman propane lantern: 976 lumens
Coleman Quad LED: 190 lumens
Oil Lantern: 50 lumens
Moon: 1 lumen

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By rogerk
Aug 30, 2013
Morgan Patterson wrote:
Looks like the LED's fall pretty far behind other options. Dewalt DC020: 2700 lumens Coleman propane lantern: 976 lumens


900 Lumens is a hell of a lot of light. Here in VT we go backcountry skiing in the trees with 900 lumens, and ski as hard as we do in daylight. When I get back to the car, I often wonder if the car's lights are working properly. I think bouldering with that much light would be plenty. Unless you happen to be one of those boulderers who needs tickmarks for your starting holds.

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By Chris Vinson
Sep 23, 2013
superbrightleds.com/moreinfo/p...

Seriously the best bang for you buck in terms of weight, longevity and cost in the long run.

We have to deal with heinously hot temps and night climbing is sometimes the only way down here...love these lights.

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By Craig T
From Chicago, IL
Sep 23, 2013
Morgan Patterson wrote:
Moon: 1 lumen

Huh - I guess I never thought about what a lumen was.

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By Isa Lulu
From VA, NC, TN
Nov 5, 2013
I've had good luck with this. Not the brightest, but a pretty cool light.

backcountry.com/kelty-lumatwis...

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By Peter Beal
From Boulder Colorado
Nov 5, 2013
ABB is absolutely correct. In Boulder, for example, this study has been written up. I imagine lots of sightings of boulderers in the woods with a bunch of lanterns and headlamps would get OSMP's attention.

-static.bouldercolorado.gov/do...

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By Don Ferris
From Eldorado Springs
Nov 5, 2013
Crux of ignominy
Get a nitecore tiny monster 26. Adjustable to 3500 lumens, weighs less than a pound, fits in your hand. Powered by 4x18650 or 8 cr123 batteries. Very impressive run times. It takes a 5mm screw on the bottom like you might find on some cameras. Then get one of those gorilla pod tripods with the 5mm screw to match. You can also use it scare away grizzlies.

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By Tom M
From EU, PL
Nov 27, 2014
Sorry for resurrecting an older topic but given the advancements in LED technology they seem to be a viable option. Just get two lights on tripods.
Don Ferris wrote:
Get a nitecore tiny monster 26. Adjustable to 3500 lumens, weighs less than a pound, fits in your hand. Powered by 4x18650 or 8 cr123 batteries. Very impressive run times. It takes a 5mm screw on the bottom like you might find on some cameras. Then get one of those gorilla pod tripods with the 5mm screw to match. You can also use it scare away grizzlies.

This one looks awesome but you can get similar one from China (ebay/aliexpress) for 30-40$, of course Lumen rating on those it total BS but youtube reviews and bike forums clame they give decent light levels. I've been searching mtb forums and found few interesting options (the standard batteries are 18650 best value for money is probably LG D1 it also has a build in cell protection circuit):

Torch SkyRay KING 3x or 4x CREE XM-L2 LED ones, just read the desciption as some have only 2 brightness levels and others have 3:
ebay.com/itm/SkyRay-King-3x-CR...
CREE XM-L2 are the newest and brightest, I would prefere a warmer white light but there is no way of knowing what you'll get till it arrives.
+heat from LED warms up cells on colder days, at least in theory ;)
-power button is not waterproof (use silicone)

Or bike light with external battery pack, the pack that come whit those are crap but you can but only the light and a battery box separately and get a good brand cells.
ebay.com/itm/3600-Lumens-3-x-C...
+ small & light
+ battery level indicator (power button color)

Battery boxes allowing for individual cell charging (after removal), decent build quality too:
4x18650 enclosure with threaded plug (some bike lights have a mating plug for it)
6x18650 holder only


Basically those are the same lights (probably a little different reflector) but different enclosures. Some of the reviews clame upto 3h (others 1.5h) of battery life on HIGH, but the MEDIUM should be ok for bouldering:
Bike light

SkyRay King


Also the 4x LED models have a slightly wider beam which should be better for our purposes.

Battery info:
More battery info than you need

I'd like to run for about 3h, what do you guys think? I'm not interested in propane lanterns.

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By R. Moran
From Moab , UT
Nov 27, 2014
REtro
Brightness is good but being able to direct it is the key. amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0087FFU9Q/... these guys rock. Batteries last , super bright, get 2-3 and its like day time.

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By Tom M
From EU, PL
Nov 28, 2014
R. Moran wrote:
Brightness is good but being able to direct it is the key. amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0087FFU9Q/... these guys rock. Batteries last , super bright, get 2-3 and its like day time.

No info on the LED used is a big red flag but I appreciate the input.

Small 2-3 CREE bike (Solar Storm X2 / X3 or YINDING ~11$) lights with external battery would be ideal but they're more of a spot then flood. Flood should be better, shouldn't it? I've seen some replacement lens for scattering the beam so this might be an option as long as they don't overheat, after all they are designed to be air flow cooled.

From those big flashlight the best value is probably SkyRay Kung ~40$ (yes that is Kung not King) I would assume two set on Med or Low should be more the enought.

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By R. Moran
From Moab , UT
Nov 28, 2014
REtro
Night life
Night life

Well your bike light hooked up to a car battery 2 inches away from the wall is bright. Here is some real world field tests. Keep in mind that you will want more than a single source of light. With one light you will cast a shadow on the rock infront of you. Good luck, the night sessions have a special energy and are worth the leg work

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