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Dec 21, 2012
Let's discuss conditioning.

For a chick, I have really good upper body strength; however, I find I am fatiguing my arms when I climb. Many have explained to me, climbing is more about footwork and body position.

Like the other sports I participate in, often times the way we "feel" we should do something is not the "correct" way to do it. For example, as a kayaker, I have mastered the roll. Everything about the roll is totally counter-intuitive. When upside down in the water, your natural instinct is to bring your head up for air. This is the wrong technique. Do this and you will not come up. It is the most common error a paddler makes when in a sticky situation. Bring your head up, your hips won't snap and your paddle sweep will not bring the boat back to an upright position. The head is the last thing out of the water.

With that being said, I am sure there are some tips for practicing good foot work, etc.
The Maverick
Joined Nov 28, 2012
0 points
Dec 21, 2012
JLP wrote:
We still have time for a human sacrifice.


OMG!
The Maverick
Joined Nov 28, 2012
0 points
Dec 21, 2012
Mathematical!
Keep your feet on the wall as much as possible. Use your toes. Turn your hips into the wall. Drop those knees. Climb more. Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Joined Jul 11, 2008
123 points
Dec 21, 2012
The self coached climber. Buy it redlude97
Joined Jun 21, 2010
8 points
Dec 21, 2012
climb with people who are better than you and learn ... bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
1,941 points
Dec 21, 2012
redlude97 wrote:
The self coached climber. Buy it


+1
SMR
Joined Jul 20, 2008
857 points
Dec 21, 2012
Sweet!! Thanks guys. Will do. The Maverick
Joined Nov 28, 2012
0 points
Dec 21, 2012
Turn your hip into the wall is good advice. (Climb like an Egyptian.) Also try stepping high and shifting all your weight over that foot with your knee bent. (Good for resting and clipping.)

Watch and copy climbers who seem to dance up the wall.

Don't think of yourself as a chick. ;-)
wendy weiss
Joined Mar 17, 2006
16 points
Dec 21, 2012
Stabby
A few common causes of newbie-pump besides not enough footwork is forgetting to breathe, over gripping, not shaking out on good stances, being nervous. Also, the muscles and tendons we employ doing this are not easy to develop, but once they are you'll exert less energy holding on. This sport is a lot like golf in that there is no substitute for time unless you are 13 and strong. Forgetting to breathe is a big one, we all struggle with it at times. You need an array of moves in your quiver.
One gym trick to work your footwork is to get on the least vertical wall and climb with one hand only.
Mike Lane
From Centennial, CO
Joined Jan 21, 2006
839 points
Dec 21, 2012
Beginner ideas from a beginner:

Work on quiet feet - no scraping, clunky, loud gumby stuff.

Place your foot once, exactly how you think you want it and move without adjusting. This will make you think about what you are doing even if the placement is horrible.

Do a route, think about parts that are hard for you, think about how pushing/pulling/standing/dropping,twisting with your legs and feet can make the move easier, retry and see if it works.

Try out heels hooks for moving, resting, leaning, have fun with 'em.

Climb a lot, all the time. Obsess about it. Don't kayak, that's not climbing.

All tips and tricks are pretty worthless unless you're climbing every chance you get. If you are decent at kayaking you will understand.
Che
From grnd junction, co
Joined Aug 14, 2009
4 points
Dec 21, 2012
Mike Lane wrote:
A few common causes of newbie-pump besides not enough footwork is forgetting to breathe, over gripping, not shaking out on good stances, being nervous. Also, the muscles and tendons we employ doing this are not easy to develop, but once they are you'll exert less energy holding on. This sport is a lot like golf in that there is no substitute for time unless you are 13 and strong. Forgetting to breathe is a big one, we all struggle with it at times. You need an array of moves in your quiver. One gym trick to work your footwork is to get on the least vertical wall and climb with one hand only.


Oooo...I like that advice about the gym trick. Seems like that would engage your core as well for balance. Right?
The Maverick
Joined Nov 28, 2012
0 points
Dec 21, 2012
Che wrote:
Beginner ideas from a beginner: Work on quiet feet - no scraping, clunky, loud gumby stuff. Place your foot once, exactly how you think you want it and move without adjusting. This will make you think about what you are doing even if the placement is horrible. Do a route, think about parts that are hard for you, think about how pushing/pulling/standing/dropping,twisting with your legs and feet can make the move easier, retry and see if it works. Try out heels hooks for moving, resting, leaning, have fun with 'em. Climb a lot, all the time. Obsess about it. Don't kayak, that's not climbing. All tips and tricks are pretty worthless unless you're climbing every chance you get. If you are decent at kayaking you will understand.


Roger that! See I get frustrated if I don't succeed the first time. You are right. Sticking with it and concentrating on foot placement is key. Would you suggest lower climbs and repeat them over and over again?
The Maverick
Joined Nov 28, 2012
0 points
Dec 22, 2012
At the BRC
Ericka, I think you need to start tying in with a bowline. Mark E Dixon
From Sprezzatura, Someday
Joined Nov 29, 2007
204 points
Dec 22, 2012
5.6+
Who would put a 5.4 route on their "to do list" unless they were really a gumby? She's for real. Rick McL
From Arvada CO
Joined Feb 24, 2009
39 points
Dec 22, 2012
I'd do the West Ridge of the Pigeon. Buff Johnson
Joined Dec 19, 2005
1,499 points
Dec 22, 2012
Me again!
You can worry about conditioning when you can climb, and as I see it, you are about two years away from being able to climb. This sport is not like those other ones you mentioned, you will see. Climbing 5.7 is not really climbing. Not the type you condition for anyways. I used to do all of those sports and I was great. I chose climbing because I suck. I will always suck. You will always suck. Get used to the idea you are in a sport that is very measurable and, you suck, a lot, and you don't need to worry about conditioning until you know what hang dogging is.

And if you just trolled me, well done.
J Q
Joined Mar 11, 2012
58 points
Dec 22, 2012
Kegel exercises!

Sorry, I couldn't help myself;) Check out Eric Horst's Training For Climbing.
Superclimber
Joined Mar 7, 2009
1,481 points
Dec 22, 2012
Jonhy Q wrote:
You can worry about conditioning when you can climb, and as I see it, you are about two years away from being able to climb. This sport is not like those other ones you mentioned, you will see. Climbing 5.7 is not really climbing. Not the type you condition for anyways. I used to do all of those sports and I was great. I chose climbing because I suck. I will always suck. You will always suck. Get used to the idea you are in a sport that is very measurable and, you suck, a lot, and you don't need to worry about conditioning until you know what hang dogging is. And if you just trolled me, well done.


LMAO...Needed that laugh...U weren't trolled.
The Maverick
Joined Nov 28, 2012
0 points
Dec 22, 2012
Chris Miller wrote:
Kegel exercises! Sorry, I couldn't help myself;) Check out Eric Horst's Training For Climbing.


OMG!! Ah, don't worry. Let it fly. I actually found some of Eric's stuff online. Looks like it's worth checking out. Time will tell.
The Maverick
Joined Nov 28, 2012
0 points
Dec 22, 2012
avatar
Don't think I have a decent answer for the OP - but if anyone's still awake here, got some old-school style answers for aspiring crag tigers.

1. Training lock-off strength:
Find the highest place in your house. Like a vaulted ceiling or a balcony. Install a 6x3/8 lag bolt with a std 3/8 hanger into a solid beam. Take an old rope and tie an overhand or 8 on a byte, and clip it in to your high point, dropping the ends to the floor. Get your ascenders. Tape them up with foam and tape; pad them well. Then put them on the ropes, sitting on the floor. Push them both up, do a pull up, then lock off on the left and push the right up. Then pull up. Lock off on the right and push the left up. Continue till the top. (Wear a harness and clip into the ascenders for safety if desired.) Once at the top, reverse the process and descend. Over time, work up to doing laps. This is a great technique to take 5.9/5.10 climbers into the 5.11/5.12 range. (Yes, it's about footwork, but the question was conditioning for climbing...)

2. Training crimp strength:
Start when you are able to do at least several pullups and some hard crimps. Pick a solid door-jamb ledge, like the one from the hall into the bathroom. Chalk up if desired. Do one finger-ledge pull-up. Rest. Then do two. Go away and do the dishes. Come back and do three. Go away and start the laundry. Continue till a maximum is reached. Then start to descend, one at a time. For example, if 5 is your max, you'll do 1, then 2, then 3, then 4, then 5, then continue with 4, then 3, then 2, then finish with 1. This is called doing pyramids. Before long you'll be up to 20 as the max. The total number done is the square of the max. So when you're up to 20, you've done 400 finger-ledge pullups. This exercise will take you from 5.10 to 5.12. Same admonitions about footwork - footwork is so key - but this will train crimp strength needed for a lot of 5.12 face routes.

Trolls aside, hoping this helps any aspiring climbers out there.
dancesatmoonrise
Joined Apr 3, 2011
749 points
Dec 22, 2012
Mathematical!
Use an open handed crimp whenever possible. Crimping hard will contribute to elbow problems if you don't use an open grip. Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Joined Jul 11, 2008
123 points
Dec 23, 2012
Hey Maverickůsomeone is selling Metolius rock rings in the for sale forum for cheap. Superclimber
Joined Mar 7, 2009
1,481 points
Dec 23, 2012
Other than being very fit, the only way to get better at climbing is by climbing alot.

Otherwise read Mark Twight's body of work. He has a book called "Extreme Alpinism" which is filled with handy tips for the climber that is bitten with the fittness bug.

A must read for everyone is the great Outside magazine article The hell on earth fittness plan. That is an approximation of the title, the article is easily found on outsideonline.com. I am unable to produce links or funny pictures with words on them. Would that I could.
John Husky
Joined May 10, 2011
3 points
Dec 23, 2012
Oh, I forgot to mention:

The quickest way to make climbing super shitty is to go all ape-crap with the forearm training and finger squeezers and crimping and hut, hut, hut and then all of a sudden comes a crippling case of tendernitis.

I got the tendernitis in both elbows and it blows man. And that shit sticks around like a bad roommate. The only cure is like 4 months of sitting around.

Watch out for over/bad training.
John Husky
Joined May 10, 2011
3 points
Administrator
Dec 23, 2012
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
Just go climb. Don't overdo it. Don't worry about grades. Pick a route you can barely get up and do it until you can ascend it in a clean, almost effortless style. Pointers on technique are all fine and well, but someone telling you what a drop knee is doesn't matter a hill of beans until you reach a sequence that requires it and it becomes intuitive- that's just one example. Don't expect to go a few times a month and progress either. If it's something you're passionate about and really want to become good at, you have to devote a shitload of time to it- even when you don't feel like it sometimes.

John makes an excellent point about being new and getting injured. You don't even have to do crazy, climbing muscle-specific shit to get injured. Just climbing too much in general when your muscles and tendons are not accustomed to the stresses can be enough to injure you. The best conditioning for a new climber is simply climbing. There is no magic shortcut. Except for maybe auto belays.
Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Joined Jul 30, 2011
1,005 points
Dec 23, 2012
Dirty hippies don't need to train. nicelegs
From Denver
Joined Oct 29, 2012
16 points


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