Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
need advice for finding partners
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
Page 1 of 2.  1  2   Next>   Last>>
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
Nov 9, 2012
hi,
I just moved to boulder from vail and have been trad climbing a few times with a guide friend but I'm not sure what the best way to find a consistent partner is. I climb in gyms when I have to but really prefer the outdoors. I'm just starting out which is why I think it's hard for people to want to go with me. any advice would be greatly appreciated. thanks!
scarenbauer
From boulder, co
Joined Nov 3, 2012
0 points
Nov 9, 2012
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.
if you're a chick, pictures will help ;) Honestly though it will, have you tried meeting anyone at the gym and climbing outside? I've taught a lot of beginners that don't stay interested long. You need to show you're committed. NickinCO
From colorado
Joined Sep 17, 2010
239 points
Nov 9, 2012
I've tried, just seems like everyone I meet is more interested in climbing inside. I am much more interested in climbing real rocks, but just love the feeling of making it to the top. I'm definitely committed but it's hard to keep going when there's nobody to go with! scarenbauer
From boulder, co
Joined Nov 3, 2012
0 points
Nov 9, 2012
Thunderbolt Peak in the Palisades
In socal we have plenty of groups like the southern california mountaneering association, caltech alpine club, and socal climbers via meetup.

I would suggest joining a mountaineering club or climbing club in your area. You will definitely find partners that way. And there MUST be climbing / mountaineering clubs in CO.
randy88fj62
Joined May 28, 2010
67 points
Nov 9, 2012
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.
randy88fj62 wrote:
In socal we have plenty of groups like the southern california mountaneering association, caltech alpine club, and socal climbers via meetup. I would suggest joining a mountaineering club or climbing club in your area. You will definitely find partners that way. And there MUST be climbing / mountaineering clubs in CO.


CMC has a boulder group.

cmcboulder.org/

Might be worth checking out?

I can recommend to stay AWAY from the "meetup" groups though
NickinCO
From colorado
Joined Sep 17, 2010
239 points
Nov 9, 2012
Bocan
I've tried, just seems like everyone I meet is more interested in climbing inside.quote>

Really? I despise the gym and only go when forced by mother nature.

You must be meeting people in the indoor "scene".
Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Joined Feb 15, 2006
927 points
Nov 9, 2012
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.
Scott McMahon wrote:
I've tried, just seems like everyone I meet is more interested in climbing inside.quote> Really? I despise the gym and only go when forced by mother nature. You must be meeting people in the indoor "scene".


When I first moved out here I went to BRC a lot (I lived 3 blocks away). There are definitely a lot of "indoor climber only types" usually not interested in the actual climbing just fitness.
NickinCO
From colorado
Joined Sep 17, 2010
239 points
Nov 9, 2012
The partner forum/bulletin board on this website is actually a pretty good resource. Pick a day when you want to climb and post a message asking for partners on that day.
It might not hurt to pick a fairly easy climb with a short approach for your first climb with someone. That way if things don't work out you can bail without too much trouble.
mark felber
From Wheat Ridge, CO
Joined Jul 30, 2005
58 points
Nov 9, 2012
thanks for all the info! super helpful. scarenbauer
From boulder, co
Joined Nov 3, 2012
0 points
Mar 8, 2014
I totally understand you. I have the same problem. Got addicted to climbing 4 months ago and my partner recently just ditched me for another chick (even though I'm a girl too). Now I'm stuck by myself trying to find some people, but everybody seemed to be with partners already or are too experienced and it is not fun for them to climb with me (even though I climb 10.a/b already)
And meetup don't help either :(
Just don't want to stop climbing because of that.
Mina123
Joined Mar 8, 2014
0 points
Mar 9, 2014
Flatirons
Use MP. Also try bouldering outdoors and talking to people there.

I used to live in Boulder and 0% of my partners came from the gym.
Ryan Watts
From Bishop, CA
Joined Apr 15, 2013
49 points
Mar 9, 2014
beck on limestone
yep... find outdoor climbers outdoors. I assume you asked your guide friend to connect you? You might ask in the local climbing shop.

On consistency..if I call someone 3 times to go climbing and they prevaricate or have something else going on in their life, then I move them way back on the call list. Doesn't matter if they are climbing hard, look nice or whatever. They don't match me in my aspirations.

About 35 years ago I remember hanging out in Eldo looking for partners and nobody would give me the time of day. I thought that place was ultra cliquey. Then I went climbing with my local friends Dan and Jim Michaels and suddenly I was someone OK to say hello to.

Posting for partners is risky. I do it and I am a self confessed climbing slut. But I've got 40 years of experience. Never believe without seeing what someone tells you is their leading grade.

Someone suggested a short climb and short approach with a new partner...second that. I personally don't do anything first time I can't solo...

Just walk up and ask... which takes a bit of courage; be truthful about your experience. Look them in the eye and be honest with yourself what your goals are.

Always treat your partners with respect and deference and insist on the same treatment (be on time, flake the rope, provide an attentive belay, ask question beforehand and discuss the logistics if needed...I'm gonna lower you from the anchors? for instance. Never schedule an unbreakable appointment at the end of what you anticipate is a climbing day.

Even if you don't particularly like your new partner, treat them well. Word gets around fast if you trash talk on someone.

Once you make a climbing date don't break it to climb with someone who leads higher grades and climbs harder or you like better. That is the fastest way I know to get a bad reputation.
Thomas Beck
From Las Vegas, Nevada
Joined Feb 5, 2006
866 points
Mar 9, 2014
I live in MA so it is not time to go outdoors right now. But i will try to as soon as it becomes warm.
My ex-partner should read your comments here as it is completely applies to him.

Thanks. I definitely will be causious about posting and trusting new partners.
Mina123
Joined Mar 8, 2014
0 points
Mar 9, 2014
J-Tree
Scarenbauer: A couple of tips: If you want to meet partners on MP fill in your profile a bit, tick climbs you have done, list some favorites, describe your climbing goals.
Provide gear: Aside your your own shoes/harness/belay device/helmet buy a rope at least.
Be a good belayer, especially in belaying a leader. No short-roping, not too much slack, pay attention.
Be a good follower: Carry your share of the gear on approaches, don't make people wait for you while you are putting on your harness, changing your shoes etc. Be appreciative and no complaining!
Even if you are interested in trad routes, I would suggest you get into sport climbing as well. Single pitch sport is an easy way to check out new partners in a more controlled environment. Hang out at Table in the winter and the Canal Zone in the summer and you can meet potential partners. Those are pretty social climbing areas where you can meet and chat with people who are into outdoor climbing. After work bouldering on Flagstaff or Sanitas is another good way to meet climbers who are less gym focused. If you do go to the gym, I would recommend the Spot as the most social environment, people tend to go to Movement or BRC with partners and be less open to chatting.
David Houston
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Nov 18, 2001
184 points
Mar 9, 2014
The traverse out to the Yellow Ridge on the Dogsti...
Here's my take. (Some people might view parts of it as self-serving, but there's nothing I can do about that.)

Join a gym and try to go regularly. You will inevitably meet people that way, and not all of them climb indoors exclusively.

Look for older men and women who appear to be reasonably fit. These people are likely to be experienced (although there are no guarantees and there is the perpetual beginner syndrome to worry about), and if they have already had long careers, they are more likely to be open to casual days out that you'd fit in to as a newcomer. Hard-charging younger folks with a climbing agenda and tick list won't want to be slowed down by a beginner. They may take you along but may also drag you up whatever they feel like doing without any thought about what is appropriate for you. We've all seen the miserable scenes that ensue from that dynamic.

So get yourself invited to climb with the the old fogies in the gym---it isn't hard, just ask them a question about some aspect of climbing. You'll get an idea from how they answer you what type of people they are and may well get an invitation to join them in their gym activities, which is the first step.

Then comes the issue of how to get asked back for a second date. Here are a few tips.

(1) Above all, be a competent and attentive belayer. Handle the ropes correctly, keep your eyes on the leader, and DON'T CHAT.

(2) Expedition mentality: see what needs to be done and do it; don't sit around uselessly while other people take care of things for you. Help with pulling rappels and coiling ropes, restack ropes at belays while the leader is re-racking, recover shoes left at the base of routes, etc. It doesn't hurt to have delicious snacks in your pack you can share.

(3) Proper and efficient handling of gear for trad climbing is essential. Learn to clean gear efficiently and use procedures that guarantee you don't drop it. (If you do drop gear, you should replace it. But really---don't drop it.) Arriving at the belay with gear tangled and clipped all over the place is bad. Get a single over-the shoulder sling and clip all cleaned gear to that, so that the sling can just be passed over to the leader. Do not disassemble trad quick draws. Full-length runners can be carried over-the-shoulder. Never unclip a bunch of stuff and hand it over to the leader as a fistfull.

(4) If at all possible, learn as much as you can about safe, proper, and efficient rappelling in the gym, before you have to do it outside.

(5) Especially if you don't go out with the old fogies, you may find yourself on routes beyond your abilities, and you should have some strategies for getting out of trouble if you can't do the moves. In some cases, it could come down to hopefully no more than a short prussik ascent of the rope. Again, if at all possible, learn how to do this in the gym and then remember to have enough stuff with you to do it on a climb if you have to.

I'm not listing this, but there's nothing the matter with learning some self-rescue techniques. Just understand that in order to actually use them in the field you have to be much more experienced, and even even for experienced people many, perhaps most, of the techniques aren't going to work as practiced and improvisation will be critical. That said, it makes sense not to go to remote places where help will be hard to get with people you don't know.

Once you've learned a bunch of stuff from the old fogies, it will be time to head out with younger more ambitious climbers, at least if you want to raise your ability level with increasingly challenging climbing.
rgold
From Poughkeepsie, NY
Joined Feb 15, 2008
288 points
Mar 9, 2014
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.
realize this thread is over a year old? NickinCO
From colorado
Joined Sep 17, 2010
239 points
Mar 9, 2014
The traverse out to the Yellow Ridge on the Dogsti...
The previous five posts to mine are all recent---I was replying to them. rgold
From Poughkeepsie, NY
Joined Feb 15, 2008
288 points
Mar 9, 2014
rgold wrote:
(2) Expedition mentality: see what needs to be done and do it; don't sit around uselessly while other people take care of things for you. Help with pulling rappels and coiling ropes, restack ropes at belays while the leader is re-racking, recover shoes left at the base of routes, etc. It doesn't hurt to have delicious snacks in your pack you can share.


This!!!
Eric Chabot
From Thetford Ctr, VT
Joined Jul 16, 2011
90 points
Mar 9, 2014
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Pea...
Mina replied only a few hours ago, so the thread once again is resurrected. Good luck finding some good partners, Mina. I think you'll do fine. Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
Joined Jan 1, 2001
1,494 points
Mar 9, 2014
Do people really get annoyed waiting 2-3 minutes to change shoes?

If so, they really need to untwist those panties.
Eliot Augusto
From Boulder, CO
Joined Dec 29, 2013
35 points
Mar 9, 2014
Eliot Augusto wrote:
Do people really get annoyed waiting 2-3 minutes to change shoes? If so, they really need to untwist those panties.


Fair question, 2-3 minutes is not long, but over the course of the day these things do add up.

When climbing with an efficient, experienced partner it is easy to get 10 pitches of climbing in a day at Rumney (local for me).

When climbing with n00bs who lollygag around all day and take a million years to do everything I am lucky to get 4.

So when I commit an entire day/weekend and make the drive to trad climb at a cliff like cannon or cathedral, I wanna get in more than 4 pitches. Just sayin.

Rereading this before posting I come off as a self-righteous jerkoff internet hardman, which is not my intention. We must nurture the noobs. At the end of the day, people get different things out of climbing: if you wanna chill at the crag, climb 2 pitches and then go grab a beer find some people who are on the same page...if you wanna climb a lot find people who are stoked to climb a lot.
Eric Chabot
From Thetford Ctr, VT
Joined Jul 16, 2011
90 points
Mar 9, 2014
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.
Stich wrote:
Mina replied only a few hours ago, so the thread once again is resurrected. Good luck finding some good partners, Mina. I think you'll do fine.



Ahh now I understand, it was a chick so it's all cool…. anyone else would have been ripped for resurrecting a thread over a year old.
NickinCO
From colorado
Joined Sep 17, 2010
239 points
Mar 9, 2014
Along with the yummy snacks, don't forget to bring some weed too. After climbing, while coiling the rope, putting your things in your pack, spark up a bowl. 9.8 times outta 10 you'll get some takers. mitchy
From nunya gotdamn business.
Joined Aug 29, 2009
16 points
Mar 9, 2014
[Words by Eric Chabot]

That's fair. I'm still really new to climbing(4 months or so) and I see a different side. Sure, I could race up a dozen 5.7s in one day, be tired and feel great. But, right now I am more focused on learning the techniques.

Is it common for people to be accepting of someone like me, who can take an hour for a single 10a/b pitch and fall a number of times? Or are most likely to get agitated?

I know everyone is different, but I've only climbed with one person and there is usually wind-up/down time before each pitch.

2nd on the weed.
Eliot Augusto
From Boulder, CO
Joined Dec 29, 2013
35 points
Mar 9, 2014
Thank for pacience and sorry for resurecting the thread. I noticed the date only after I replied.
Eliot: my partner explained himself by saying that she is better climber than me and climbs just same paths as he does 11b/c. And apparently, I can't say for everyone, but for climbers it is interesting to be with the same level climbers.
Me personally, I don't care what you are climbing. This way everybody can learn from each other.
Thanks for advised. Definitely will take them into cosideretion. As a new climber I'm not into sport climbed ng right now. And not a big expert in lead either. But working on it.
Mina123
Joined Mar 8, 2014
0 points
Mar 10, 2014
Jose Cuervo Fruitcups dirtbag style
Invest in a big backpack. Don't just show up at the crag with a "girlfriend" daypack (big enough to only hold chalkbag/shoes/harness/water) - this applies to guys too. doligo
Joined Sep 26, 2008
437 points


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 2.  1  2   Next>   Last>>
Beyond the Guidebook:
The Definitive Climbing Resource
Inspiration & Motivation
to Fuel Your Run
Next Generation Mountain
Bike Trail Maps
Backcountry, Sidecountry
& Secret Stashes
Better Data. Better Tools.
Better Hikes!