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NBD, Narcissistic Bolting Disorder S 

NBD, Narcissistic Bolting Disorder 

YDS: 5.9+ French: 5c Ewbanks: 17 UIAA: VI ZA: 17 British: E1 5a

   
Type:  Sport, 1 pitch, 60'
Consensus:  YDS: 5.10a French: 6a Ewbanks: 18 UIAA: VI+ ZA: 18 British: E1 5a [details]
FA: Wright, Zimmerman
New Route: Yes
Page Views: 584
Submitted By: Richard M. Wright on Dec 16, 2006

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Description 

NBD, or Megaloboltia as it is known in the clinical literature, is an unrealistic belief in one's grandiose bolting abilities, and even omnipotent bolting. It is characterized by a need for total power and control over the environment, and is marked by a lack of empathy for anything that is unbolted. Although NBD is a term often ascribed to anyone who is bolt-hungry, the clinical definition is that of a mental illness associated with narcissistic bolting behavior (NBB). Narcissistic bolting is most simply defined as bolt-love. Though it is considered healthy to be narcissistic to some degree, when someone loves bolts to the exclusion of all else and others become objectified to be used only to serve the bolting-self (the bolt-Id), this is no longer considered healthy or normal. There are different psychological theories about how and why NBD develops, most of which relate to the integration of different aspects of ego and self as a child, and the nature of the parental roles in that process. Regardless of theory, NBD is characterized by extremely low self-esteem, which is compensated for by delusions of grandeur and megaloboltia, a narcissistic neuroses. With the propensity to Bolt only on behalf of one's self, the unbridled need to feed one's ego, and the objectification of others to serve the power-hungry needs of megaloboltia, it is easy to see how this can be a recipe for disaster, especially when wrapped in a psychotic personality. One of the most well known examples of megaloboltia in modern history was Adolf Hitler. A street waif, Hitler wasn't content rising through the ranks to become the military leader of Germany. His megaloboltia drove him to bolt the entire climbing world. Being born into a "superior race" also wasn't enough for the mentally ill Hitler. Instead he wanted to bolt all other crags throughout the world. This need to bolt everything outside of what he perceived as an extension of himself is a classic though horrifically illustrated example of megaloboltia. Paradoxically, a person who exhibits such tremendous ego and self-confidence in reality has such low self-esteem and such a fragile ego that he cannot abide any expression other than his own, for fear of annihilation of the self. Therefore everything that is not under his control is perceived as a threat. While megaloboltia is an extreme example, serial bolters often objectify, and then sacrifice their entire lives to total control of the frightening "outside" with a complete lack of empathy for the bolting of others.


Location 

The right of three routes on the slab (C in photo).


Protection 

Eight draws and a rope.



Comments on NBD, Narcissistic Bolting Disorder Add Comment
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By Tom Hanson
Dec 18, 2006

Richard,

Anyone we know?

By Richard M. Wright
From: Lakewood, CO
Dec 18, 2006

I'm afraid so. I took that one right in the chest and figured it would make a good route name. The plan had been Eldo, but we ended up here for an NBD session. Moral: never trust a climbing partner....

By allen simons
Mar 7, 2007
rating: 5.10a/b 6a+ 19 VI+ 19 E2 5b PG13

I found this route to be fun although I fixed a rope and used the ascender as my belay partner. Glad I wasn't leading it though. 9+??? I would give it a 10 for its pumpy nature. I appreciate the bolts by the way. Others may not however, so beware.

By Greg Sievers
From: Estes Park, CO
Mar 11, 2012

After climbing this route several times over the last several year, I think the consensus would be solid 5.10, with the crux being a long reach (harder for shorter folks) at the roof. Stemming seems to help maintain order.
This is an excellent off-season, after-work, or 1/4-day destination.
All 3 routes are quite good.