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more injury prone lately.. suggestions?
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By dirtbag
From Bellingham, WA
Apr 30, 2012
i really enjoyed this drive to the tetons... can't...
Seems like I have been developing overuse injuries/syndromes way more frequently than I used to. For instance, I used to off the couch go and run until my legs failed me with no problem. Now semi-off the couch I do the same and i get inflammation in a posterior ligament/tendon in my knee. I might sound like I'm asking for it in that example but the point is the marked decrease in adaptability and ability to recover. Same goes for climbing specific activities.

Anyone who in their mid 20's experience said change in their bodies have advice?

Thanks,
Braden




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By Lloyd B
Apr 30, 2012
I'm new to climbing, but I've been doing crossfit, running, etc. for a while. I found that over time I was getting injured more frequently and more severely. I was pulling elbow tendons, calf issues, knee problems. I'm in my 20s so that really shouldn't be happening. I started stretching regularly, and saw a myofascial massage therapist when things got out of hand (google the term to look for people in your area, there's also a main stream outfit called Airrosti that might be near you). Those changes made all the difference in the world. So my problem was getting less flexible as my muscles built up over time and the tension was making me injury prone. Not sure how much stretching you do or how hard you train, but that might be your issue.

Good luck,

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By John Farrell
From Phoenix, AZ
Apr 30, 2012
Having fun at the Enchanted Tower.
dirtbag wrote:
Seems like I have been developing overuse injuries/syndromes way more frequently than I used to. For instance, I used to off the couch go and run until my legs failed me with no problem. Now semi-off the couch I do the same and i get inflammation in a posterior ligament/tendon in my knee. I might sound like I'm asking for it in that example but the point is the marked decrease in adaptability and ability to recover. Same goes for climbing specific activities. Anyone who in their mid 20's experience said change in their bodies have advice? Thanks, Braden


Wait until you get in your 40's....

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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Apr 30, 2012
Bocan
haha yeah don't get old. Welcome to the aging process dude...it doesn't get any better it gets WORSE!!

Advice?

DON'T work through injuries, treat them properly. They WILL come back to haunt you later!

Stretch! Do yoga or what ever it takes.

Have proper nutrion and good habits.

Sleep and hydrate

Build a time machine and take me with you.

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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Apr 30, 2012
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
That's about when I first started noticing it too. I went from running sub six minute miles (early twenties) for three or four miles to just running for a prescribed period of time slowly, to a basketball league, to a half-court league, to not at all, to walking on a treadmill to fuck it. All within twelve years or so. The adage is true, getting old sucks. I started climbing almost two years ago, late, so I was already aware that I wouldn't be able to go balls out like I was 20 years old.

Some people are genetically gifted with rubber tendons and marshmallow joints. I'm not one of 'em. Sounds like you're not either.

Get the most out of your time climbing (tailor specific training for specific goals if you don't already, which btw, I don't do) research low impact cardio; cycling, swimming, whatever you're into. The biggest thing is to accept that you can't do what you could a few years ago, and that trend will continue. There are certain things you can do to abate the symptoms (e.g. better diet, joint pills, whatever), but they are here to stay in one form or another. Sadly. Good luck.

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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Apr 30, 2012
Bocan
Male bodies start to lose muscle around your mid-20s. When you think about thinks from either a historical or evolutionary vantage point, 25 was about the max life expentancy for a human. Our bodies have not evolved so much that we have really overcome that, but thanks to science, nutrition, quality of life and lack of natural predators we live considerably longer than we probably should.

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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Apr 30, 2012
Bocan
JLP wrote:
No they don't. Look at the greats in any sport, and their age. Mid 20's is late puberty. 20-something is about the age where you can't run around like a dumb-ass anymore and expect to recover and remain injury free, that is all. Most find their peak somewhere in their 30's, but that really just speaks to the elite.


That's because they are athletes. But you're right, let me rephrase. Muscle loss can begin as early as your low twentys (some say 25 is the age), but that is also based upon level of activity and your particular body. Some may not see large amounts of loss until even up to their 50's. BUT it can occur as early as the 20s.

Great athletes don't experience that kind of loss because...well, they are great athletes. :o)

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By Brent Apgar
From Out of the Loop
Apr 30, 2012
Me and Spearhead
To echo what's being said. Don't abuse the crap out of yourself like you could @ 18.
And start educating yourself about maintenance care (fascial release, massage, some time in the weight room... etc) and the biggest factor probably being dialing in what your body needs for recovery (sleep, nutrition, rest days...etc)

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By pfwein
From Boulder, CO
Apr 30, 2012
What's the average of age of winners of climbing competitions these days? If it's over 25, I'd be quite surprised (which isn't saying much).

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By Kyle Jones
From Portland, OR
Apr 30, 2012
One thing I have found is to warm up properly. For running, this means a (relatively significant) warmup and cooldown. Same thing for climbing. I will spend 15 - 30 minutes on routes/traversing much lower than my limit before even thinking about getting on something challenging. If I don't, I definitely feel the consequences.

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By thecornyman
From Oakland, CA
May 1, 2012
mike
In addition to what others have said I started taking glucosamine for my joint and tendon pains and/or injures and it seems to make a great difference. I still have the pains the day after but now they only last for about a day and recovery time seems a great deal faster. For the supplement to help it's important to have a constant supply. I either take a pill 3 times a day or the liquid stuff morning and night. Liquid is a lot better being that your body absorbs it more than a pill but it's pretty pricey. I buy mine online here: amazon.com/gp/product/B0015VE5...
I'm definitely no doctor but I've been told this is something your body creates on its own so shouldn't be harmful.

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By dirtbag
From Bellingham, WA
May 1, 2012
i really enjoyed this drive to the tetons... can't...
Your comments have reminded me of some basic principles I could definitely be more disciplined with (ie warming up thoroughly) and stretching). I think i'll try some fish oil and glycosamine more regularly now along with a diet with less carbs- more fruits and veggies.

thanks and keep em comin..

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