Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Making a codelette from 3/4" webbing
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
By Adam Paashaus
From Greensboro, North Carolina
Nov 27, 2012
After you get done climbing be sure to head up to the summit for sunset. Its only a 10 minute walk from the main wall. Don't forget your headlamp.
Cordelettes have been my anchoring method of choice and I also use a mammut dyneema sling of the same length that I love (i'm gonna die). My question is this. I am ready to retire 1 or both of them. I have TONS of 3/4" webbing and was curious weather I could just tie a water knot and make a long loop and use that as a cordelette. I would of course tape the tails and check the knot often as water knots tend to loosen easy. Anybody see this as being a bad idea? Would the knot form a weakness in the system enough to make it potentially dangerous in a worst case scenario like a factor 2 fall onto the anchor?
Adam

FLAG
By Ryan N
From San Louis Obispo
Nov 27, 2012
RJN
This is gonna be fun...

FLAG
By Dan Bachen
Nov 27, 2012
I use a simmilar method except with 1/2 inch webbing. I have a loop(~20ft) in which I have 2 knots tied 6 in apart in the center (adapted from Long's anchor book), I clove hitch each arm to 1 or 2 pieces of gear (dooing my best to equlize) and clip a locker through each piece of webbing in between the knots, works like a charm. The 3/4 inch might be a bit bulkey but should be just as safe as a cordelette.

FLAG
By Portwood
From Your moms house last night
Nov 27, 2012
Me
It will be fine other than the extra bulk and weight.

Another option to consider; tie a fixed loop in each end of the webbing using your favorite knot, when you build an anchor clip both ends into the same piece to create a loop and use it as you normally would a cordelette. Or (for a longer anchor) you can clip those ends to different pieces and the middle (of the webbing) to your other piece(s) and again tie it off like you normally would.

Donít forget, the rope is stronger and absorbs more from a shock load so if you are switching leads consider just build an anchor using the rope.

On another note, people become so concerned with their anchor that they overlook one of the most important parts to a safe anchor system. And that is the first piece of pro to protect the anchor. The follower cannot shock load the anchor anywhere close to what could happen in a "factor 2" leader fall. That is where an absolutely solid piece just above the anchor should really be your concern.
Just my two cents, there are plenty of safe ways and materials to build your anchor with.

Cheers!

FLAG
By AnthonyM
Nov 27, 2012
Maroon Bells-Bell Cord Couloir
Your better off with a Daisy Chain or Prusik/Cord Anchor.
I used to use a daisy chain/PAS but now I am digging This

Also:
Helpful Link

I don't think webbing is a good idea unless the situation calls for it. I would consider other options...

This thread will be a fun one...

Cheers,

-A

FLAG
By Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Nov 27, 2012
OTL
Portwood wrote:
And that is the first piece of pro to protect the anchor.


The Jesus Nut. Mentioned in the anchor books, but glossed over by too many of the readers.

FLAG
By Adam Paashaus
From Greensboro, North Carolina
Nov 27, 2012
After you get done climbing be sure to head up to the summit for sunset. Its only a 10 minute walk from the main wall. Don't forget your headlamp.
Anthony Milano wrote:
Your better off with a Daisy Chain or Prusik/Cord Anchor. I used to use a daisy chain/PAS but now I am digging This Also: Helpful Link I don't think webbing is a good idea unless the situation calls for it. I would consider other options... This thread will be a fun one... Cheers, -A

I already use a purcell prusik for my PAS. I'm refering to a cordelette for rigging my anchor.

Portwood, I thought about making more of a "webbolette" by having the bights on the end but you end up loosing the top shelf that way and I use that routinely.

No comments on the strength of the knot?

FLAG
By bearbreeder
Nov 27, 2012
check the knot before use and youll be fine ...

its that simple ;)

FLAG
 
By ian watson
From Albuquerque, NM
Nov 27, 2012
I like the 7mil static better, when there are knots Clove etc. it is more easy to identify them as right.

FLAG
By Adam Paashaus
From Greensboro, North Carolina
Nov 27, 2012
After you get done climbing be sure to head up to the summit for sunset. Its only a 10 minute walk from the main wall. Don't forget your headlamp.
ian watson wrote:
I like the 7mil static better, when there are knots Clove etc. it is more easy to identify them as right.

Noted. I would agree. Overall size of the bundle is no more bulky but when working with it, it does seem more cumbersome.

FLAG
By ian watson
From Albuquerque, NM
Nov 28, 2012
Adam Paashaus wrote:
Noted. I would agree. Overall size of the bundle is no more bulky but when working with it, it does seem more cumbersome.



you could always just use the rope and not carry one at all, I like to have bail options or something to fix a old rap station with though. If your talking cumbersome my thinking is a BD #5 cam.

FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.