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How to tell how cold it got last night when camping with suunto watch
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By Tim Zander
Mar 14, 2012
I'm looking for a way to either tell me the min temp it got to last night, or perhaps the temp at a certain time from the middle of the night once I wake up.

I'm looking through my suunto altimax functions and while it will show me the current temp, I can't figure out to see historical temps.

Any ideas or homebrew solutions that don't require new equipment or things to pack?

For reference, I want to use this spring ski touring when camping to make sure it got good and cold to set up the snowpack for that day

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By kBobby
From Spokane, WA
Mar 14, 2012
If you are up at dawn (or even up to an hour later), the current temperature will be the nighttime low.

If you are camped in a basin, you can add about 10F to estimate the temperature of the air on the ridges above you; if you are camped on a ridge, you can add about 3 F for every 1000 feet below you of terrain that you will be skiing. These will provide pretty good off-the-cuff estimates for assessing the temperature of the snowpack around you (instead of just the single observation you make).

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By Tico
Mar 14, 2012
Some suunto's have a temp graph, it doesn't look like the altimax does from my skim of the manual (here suunto.com/en/Products/Outdoor...

But if you're looking for snow temps, get a thermometer and take normal weather obs (T air, T surf, T 20). It doesn't take long.

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By Tim Zander
Mar 14, 2012
Thanks Bobby, I figured coldest time of night was somewhere around 3am. Good to know I was wrong(and it explains why I hate getting up early when camping)

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By kBobby
From Spokane, WA
Mar 14, 2012
Tim Zander wrote:
Thanks Bobby, I figured coldest time of night was somewhere around 3am. Good to know I was wrong(and it explains why I hate getting up early when camping)

You're welcome. Under normal conditions (no fronts moving through, etc.) the air cannot start warming until the sun comes up. It actually takes an hour or so of sunshine before the heating from the sun exceeds the cooling from radiative loss to space.

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