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By Mostafa
From Alameda, CA
Oct 26, 2011
Cujo 5.11d Red Rocks
What would be a good standard beginner rack? I wanted to start climbing some trad routes about 60-100ft 1 pitch 5.5-5.7ish.

I already have from sport climbing: 10 Draws, 120 & 60(x2)cm nylon slings, about 6 locking biners, atc belay device, few oval biners, 30ft accessory cord 8mm, 10ft 6mm cord and a PAS.

Thanks for any advice.

FLAG
By berl
From Oregon
Oct 26, 2011
mostafa, a quick search in the forums will net several threads on this topic and a trip to a local climbing shop is probably even better than the internet.


this is why we need sticky topics in the forums.

FLAG
By cjdrover
From Somerville, MA
Oct 26, 2011
Taken at MWV Icefest 2014.
Many people start with a set of nuts, and then cams from about finger width to fist width. Everyone has their own brand loyalty, but you'll be fine with anything from the major players, I'd look for a sale. If you've still got some leftover cash after that consider an extra cam or two in the 1-2" range, or some smaller stuff like tcu's or c3's (really depends on what type of routes you're on, ask someone local). You'll probably want a few more 60cm slings, too, and biners to go with them.

FLAG
By Adam B
From Wheat Ridge, CO
Oct 26, 2011
Middle St. Vrain
How much cash you got?

Stopper Set

Set O' Cams

Just to cover the bases

FLAG
By NickinCO
From colorado
Oct 26, 2011
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.
For red rocks I would start with a set or two of stoppers BD #4-11's (even find them used here for cheap). Then maybe some cams in the finger to hand size like BD C4's 0.5/0.75/1/2. I've climbed there a half a dozen times or so in the last year, but I'm sure a local will comment. If you can't wait stop at the climbing shop on Charleston ave. and talk to the guys there.

FLAG
By Bryan G
From San Jose
Oct 26, 2011
Puffy jackets and Happy Boulders
In Red Rocks, you could climb a whole lot of trad with

2 sets of these
gearexpress.biz/Merchant2/merc...

and 1 set of these
gearexpress.biz/Merchant2/merc...

Not bad for $300.

You'll also probably want to pick up some extra loose carabiners for racking gear, and some more shoulder length slings. And of course, a nut tool will pay for itself over a short period of time.

FLAG
By thecornyman
From Oakland, CA
Oct 26, 2011
mike
ab527 wrote:


+1 if you can afford these that would be a good start.

FLAG
By Yarp
Oct 26, 2011
7 maybe 8 sawed off lost arrows, set of offset brass, couple big bro's, a framing hammer and a bolt gun. Yer good to go!

Or maybe you should actually start climbing trad with someone who knows what the hell their doing so that you can learn a thing or two?

Learning to use the search function on MP or any other climbing website probably wouldn't be a bad idea either.

FLAG
 
By NickinCO
From colorado
Oct 26, 2011
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.
Yarp wrote:
7 maybe 8 sawed off lost arrows, set of offset brass, couple big bro's, a framing hammer and a bolt gun. Yer good to go! Or maybe you should actually start climbing trad with someone who knows what the hell their doing so that you can learn a thing or two? Learning to use the search function on MP or any other climbing website probably wouldn't be a bad idea either.



Normally I agree with you (however much of an ass you come off as) but I think you're wrong here. I learned by reading a book, buying some gear, and going out and climbing. I'm not dead (yet) and I've done a fair amount of moderate multi-pitch. Just saying..

FLAG
By Mostafa
From Alameda, CA
Oct 26, 2011
Cujo 5.11d Red Rocks
Yarp wrote:
7 maybe 8 sawed off lost arrows, set of offset brass, couple big bro's, a framing hammer and a bolt gun. Yer good to go! Or maybe you should actually start climbing trad with someone who knows what the hell their doing so that you can learn a thing or two? Learning to use the search function on MP or any other climbing website probably wouldn't be a bad idea either.


I second Nick. I spent a month in the gym. Then went outdoor taught my self how to lead climb, rappel, self anchor, clean routes and everything else by reading books, watching videos and asking questions (which may seem dumb to you). I'm leading almost every route I've done onsight only 4th week outdoor. And aren't these forums for getting advice?

FLAG
By Jeff House
From rapid city sd
Oct 26, 2011
Wind river range 2013
you will shorten your learning curve by getting a partner who has trad climbed and is better than you are. + by learning on thier gear you learn what type of gear you like i.e i love tri cam but hate hex's if I would have climbed with someone before buying gear i would of saved 100-150 $ along the way.

FLAG
By Ryan Nevius
From The Range of Light
Oct 26, 2011
Mt. Agassiz
Mostafa wrote:
I second Nick. I spent a month in the gym. Then went outdoor taught my self how to lead climb, rappel, self anchor, clean routes and everything else by reading books, watching videos and asking questions (which may seem dumb to you). I'm leading almost every route I've done onsight only 4th week outdoor. And aren't these forums for getting advice?


Although I don't disagree that you can learn a lot from reading and self-practice, the amount of time you've been climbing kind of discredits what you are trying to argue. Self practice is extremely useful, but nothing is as good or as efficient as a good mentor.

FLAG
By Old and Busted
From Centennial, CO
Oct 26, 2011
Stabby
Since you are all about reinventing the wheel, knotted pieces of rope and chunks of 2x4's

FLAG
By Yarp
Oct 26, 2011
Mostafa wrote:
I spent a month in the gym. Then went outdoor ...I'm leading almost every route I've done onsight only 4th week outdoor.


So you've been climbing for 8 weeks total then? How did I miss your bio in last months Rock and Ice?

Please disregard my previous advice. What you really need at this point is a sponsorship.

FLAG
By coppolillo
Oct 26, 2011
Yo Mostafa,

Zero sweat, dude. Listen to the guys cool enough to give advice and know that Yarp is about the largest tool on this site. Always a nasty thing to say. Must be a quality human being. Or wildly insecure.

Best of luck to you--don't get in over your head, and don't hesitate to hire a guide for a day of one-on-one instruction. You'll learn a ton and she or he can evaluate what you're doing right and wrong.

Enjoy!

FLAG
By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Oct 26, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin
There's a whole buttload of cam and nut choices, but here's an example of a basic rack that will get you up a lot of easier climbs.

Set of BD nuts 4-13 (My first set were Abc Huevos, cheaper and worked just as well. I still carry most of them)

Metolius Powercams/Mastercams/TCUs-#1 and 2 (or aliens/basics, green and yellow)

BD C4s .5-4 (some people don't find the 4 necessary for a beginner rack, when i first started out it ended up being my most used cam)

And that will get you up what you need for now. If you want to go cheaper, check out Rock Empire or Trango. If you want variety, check out DMM, Wild Country, or my personal favorite, Totem.

Just don't be that guy that racks up with a rack of doubles from 000 BD c3 to #6 C4 for a 50 foot trad route. That's just embarrassing to watch.

FLAG
 
By Mostafa
From Alameda, CA
Oct 26, 2011
Cujo 5.11d Red Rocks
I have nothing against hiring a guide. I actually am climbing with someone more experienced now and have a climber who is a guide that is willing to help me learn. And I wouldn't ever climb trad without someone who is experienced. I was simply trying to convey from my experience with sport climbing that it is possible to learn from reading etc...

That being said I just wanted to know what people used for a standard rack. Thanks for the advice for those who gave it.

FLAG
By Dominion Rognstad
From Houston. From Boone, NC
Oct 27, 2011
In the Grand Tetons 2010.
I basically inherited a trad rack from an old friend, but what I've found most useful is really think long term before making purchases. That is why it is especially useful to try many different types of gear beforehand. No sense spending hundreds of dollars on gear that will sit in the closet. On that point, buy light and useful stuff even if it may cost a little extra now.

I really like the Sentinel nuts, DMM wallnuts or ABC huevos for beginner racks. Definitely get a nut tool. Cams are hard because they are all usable but you just have to be aware of the differences and drawbacks. Used is really not an issue, and sales can be awesome. Camalots, Dragons and Totems have all been good to me but I still pack my Flexible Friends as well on most routes.

FLAG
By coppolillo
Oct 27, 2011
sounds like you're on the right track....have a blast, dude!

FLAG
By ian watson
From Albuquerque, NM
Oct 27, 2011
bruno-cx wrote:
The only piece of gear you really need is a Prana beanie. If you wear it with a naked chest you will send as hard as Sharma.



I thought this only worked bouldering, am i doing something wrong.....? I must be, this is why I climb 5.6 trad and carry to much crap.

FLAG
By Josh Kornish
From Missoula, MT
Oct 27, 2011
Humboldt Bouldering
As stated before:

The best cheap beginner rack would be

Black Diamond Camalots:

.5, .75, 1, 2

Any set of nuts

For $300 you can get the a very beginner rack and will probably be able to sew up most of those easier routes in your area.

If you buy used on here you can go a long way for your dollar

FLAG
By Loren Tragen
From Flagstaff, AZ
Oct 27, 2011
Nameless boulder on the edge of the Holy Boulders ...
In terms of specific pieces of pro, I would recommend getting the gear required for the first trad route that you want to try. You'll end up expanding your rack as you plan for other routes. Get a helmet. And slings/biners for each piece of pro that you get.

FLAG
By tomhirschfeld
Oct 29, 2011
Heed the golden rule of buying crap:


Buy nice or buy twice

FLAG
By bus driver
Oct 29, 2011
+1 for reading books then going for it. With some pitches of following/cleaning with your experienced friends in the mix.

It sounds like you have a head for leading somewhat developed and starting to lead early is probably a natural progression.

Once you get your gear play the "nut game" every time you climb. This is where you take your rack and try to find a placement as quick as possible at ground level that you can safely clip to and hang from. Doing some clean aid climbing would help too because you have to hang from every piece so you gain confidence in your placements.

For gear, get a set of nuts for sure and start with finger to hand size peices. .5,.75,1,2 bd with an additional blue yellow orange red metolius. then get into the larger cams later.I always find I use more small cams than big ones.

Good luck,

You live in a rad place to be a climber.

FLAG
 
By bus driver
Oct 29, 2011
oh yeah, check out the book rock climbing by the sierra club for some great old photos and good info on chock craft and moving across rock in high top eb's.

FLAG
By Tom Hanson
Oct 29, 2011
Climber Drawing
Berl wrote: "a trip to a local climbing shop is probably even better than the internet."

Berl, what climbing shop do you work for on commission?

Better yet, send him to REI to get their advice.
Seriously?

FLAG


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