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How to measure strength to weight ratio?
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Apr 17, 2013
Dear,

I'd like to know how can I measure my strength-to-weight ratio. Anyone suggest a good method?

But, for example, before I begin my training, I was 65kg and did 12 pull-ups (good grip on fingerboard), today I am doing 22 pull-ups and I am 69.5kg.

Is correct to say that I almost doubled my strength-to-weight ratio? Since (22*69.5)/(12*65) = 1.96 ?

Thanks for your comments.
Brito Filho
Joined Mar 12, 2013
0 points
Apr 17, 2013
You're so HUGE!!! Can you do a pullup w. your ego yet? That is the true measure of strength to weight. Make sure to take off your shirt, put on a beanie, and wear manpris next time you measure since surely your original data was skewed if you omitted any of those parameters. Sir Wanksalot
From County Jail
Joined Sep 29, 2011
14 points
Apr 17, 2013
selfie
Sir Wanksalot wrote:
You're so HUGE!!! Can you do a pullup w. your ego yet? That is the true measure of strength to weight. Make sure to take off your shirt, put on a beanie, and wear manpris next time you measure since surely your original data was skewed if you omitted any of those parameters.


Really need a 'Like' button for these forums.
Ralph Kolva
From Evergreen, CO
Joined Jun 5, 2006
239 points
Apr 17, 2013
No, doubling your strength-to-weight ratio would be to crank 12 pullups w 1 arm. reboot
From Westminster, CO
Joined Jul 17, 2006
143 points
Administrator
Apr 17, 2013
On Everleigh Club Crack.  Photo by Burt Lindquist.
You are measuring both strength and endurance.

Using the method here
sciencelearn.org.nz/Contexts/S...

your strength has increased by 1.32
while your strength-to-weight has increased by 1.24.
Doug Hemken
Joined Oct 1, 2004
5,215 points
Apr 17, 2013
What's a KG? Camp
From Santa Fe, NM
Joined Sep 22, 2011
5 points
Apr 17, 2013
Camp wrote:
What's a KG?

I got you this.
frankstoneline
Joined Apr 23, 2009
22 points
Apr 17, 2013
Camp wrote:
What's a KG?


1 kg = 2.2 lbs
Brito Filho
Joined Mar 12, 2013
0 points
Apr 17, 2013
Doug Hemken wrote:
You are measuring both strength and endurance. Using the method here sciencelearn.org.nz/Contexts/S... your strength has increased by 1.32 while your strength-to-weight has increased by 1.24.


Thanks Doug!
Brito Filho
Joined Mar 12, 2013
0 points
Apr 17, 2013
If you have more weight than strength, you suck more.

If you have more strength than weight, you suck less.

Dear
chuffnugget
From Bolder, CO
Joined Sep 14, 2011
22 points
Apr 17, 2013
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific...

What you need to do is determine your Density, which is you mass (kg) divided by how much volume your body consumes of our atmosphere. Make certain that when you measure your volume you include the size of your cranium, which makes a huge difference. The best way to measure volume is to find a large container full of liquid, approximately 100 gallons, submerse your entire body, self , your oversized cranium, and let all of your breath out. Hold it for as long as possible while somebody records how much volume the liquid changed by, ensure that they use a measuring device that goes down to mL of liquid, best to scoop out each mL of liquid into another container.

Next you need to determine your ultimate strength. There are a few ways to do this. The easiest is to use horsepower, which can later be converted into MPa. To determine horsepower, or MPa, connect your wrists to an item that has a known horsepower, such as 4 or 5 horses (which equal approximately 4 or 5 horsepower). Also be certain to connect another part of your body (your ankles will work fine) to a fixed, stationary point. Have an assistant move the horses a know distance over a fixed period of time, an easy suggestion would be 1 meter over 1 second. If your strength cannot be determined with 4 or 5 horses then just increase the number of horses until your ultimate strength is tallied (by counting the number of horses.

Next you will obviously need your assistant to calculate your strength to weight ratio by first converting Ml to cm^3, then divide (first they need to convert Hp to Mpa, which shouldn't be hard if you help them before this "experiment" is conducted). The final thing to do is post up the results here, and onto 8a.nu.

Hope that helps!
GhaMby
From Heaven
Joined Oct 2, 2006
427 points
Administrator
Apr 17, 2013
A Very Not Snowy Christmas...
Wondering what He-man's S:W ratio is...


Morgan Patterson
Joined Oct 13, 2009
8,419 points
Apr 17, 2013
Summit of Rainier.
Wondering what He-man's S:W ratio is...

That's funny, I guess I didn't pay attention when I was a kid. I thought castle greyskull was Skeletor's castle. Sure is a creepy castle for a hero like He-Man to be hanging out in.
Mike Belu
From Indianapolis, IN
Joined Jun 3, 2012
136 points
Apr 17, 2013
Mathematical!
CaptainMo wrote:
Wondering what He-man's S:W ratio is...


Pretty sure it's got to be over 9000.
Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Joined Jul 11, 2008
123 points
Apr 17, 2013
At the BRC
Can somebody tell me the formula for the strength to spray ratio? Mark E Dixon
From Sprezzatura, Someday
Joined Nov 29, 2007
204 points
Apr 17, 2013
Obi Wan Ryobi - Darth Vader Crag, Rumney NH
Brito Filho wrote:
1 kg = 2.2 lbs


The prefix "Kilo" is always capitalized in SI units, so if we were to split hairs, both KG and kg are improper ;) So, 1 Kg = 2.2 lbs.
Brendan Blanchard
From Boulder, CO
Joined Oct 18, 2010
309 points
Administrator
Apr 17, 2013
On Everleigh Club Crack.  Photo by Burt Lindquist.
hOW mUCH fORCE iS rEQUIRED tO sPLIT hAIRS???? Doug Hemken
Joined Oct 1, 2004
5,215 points
Apr 17, 2013
At the BRC
Doug Hemken wrote:
hOW mUCH fORCE iS rEQUIRED tO sPLIT hAIRS????


You can't be too careful when you are talking about He-Man
Mark E Dixon
From Sprezzatura, Someday
Joined Nov 29, 2007
204 points
Apr 17, 2013
Right Pile, Big Cottonwood Canyon, summer 2008.
skitch wrote:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific... What you need to do is determine your Density, which is you mass (kg) divided by how much volume your body consumes of our atmosphere. Make certain that when you measure your volume you include the size of your cranium, which makes a huge difference. The best way to measure volume is to find a large container full of liquid, approximately 100 gallons, submerse your entire body, self , your oversized cranium, and let all of your breath out. Hold it for as long as possible while somebody records how much volume the liquid changed by, ensure that they use a measuring device that goes down to mL of liquid, best to scoop out each mL of liquid into another container. Next you need to determine your ultimate strength. There are a few ways to do this. The easiest is to use horsepower, which can later be converted into MPa. To determine horsepower, or MPa, connect your wrists to an item that has a known horsepower, such as 4 or 5 horses (which equal approximately 4 or 5 horsepower). Also be certain to connect another part of your body (your ankles will work fine) to a fixed, stationary point. Have an assistant move the horses a know distance over a fixed period of time, an easy suggestion would be 1 meter over 1 second. If your strength cannot be determined with 4 or 5 horses then just increase the number of horses until your ultimate strength is tallied (by counting the number of horses. Next you will obviously need your assistant to calculate your strength to weight ratio by first converting Ml to cm^3, then divide (first they need to convert Hp to Mpa, which shouldn't be hard if you help them before this "experiment" is conducted). The final thing to do is post up the results here, and onto 8a.nu. Hope that helps!


Pure gold!
skinny legs and all
From Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania
Joined Jun 23, 2009
2,757 points
Apr 17, 2013
yaak crack Red Rock Canyon, NV
Spray to Strength Ratio = {(# of self-inflammatory...
Spray to Strength Ratio = {(# of self-inflammatory posts on MP) - (# of routes sent > 5.12c )+ (# of beanies owned)} / (max # of wide grip pull-ups performed in one set)
Jon Zucco
From Denver, CO
Joined Aug 15, 2008
357 points
Apr 17, 2013
Jon Zucco wrote:


Nice!
Sir Wanksalot
From County Jail
Joined Sep 29, 2011
14 points
Apr 17, 2013
Climbing at Morro Anhangava in Southern Brasil.  (...
Camp wrote:
What's a KG?


don't you fucking ask this question again


GMBurns
Joined Jul 15, 2008
523 points
Apr 17, 2013
Shelf Rd
skitch wrote:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific... What you need to do is determine your Density, which is you mass (kg) divided by how much volume your body consumes of our atmosphere. Make certain that when you measure your volume you include the size of your cranium, which makes a huge difference. The best way to measure volume is to find a large container full of liquid, approximately 100 gallons, submerse your entire body, self , your oversized cranium, and let all of your breath out. Hold it for as long as possible while somebody records how much volume the liquid changed by, ensure that they use a measuring device that goes down to mL of liquid, best to scoop out each mL of liquid into another container. Next you need to determine your ultimate strength. There are a few ways to do this. The easiest is to use horsepower, which can later be converted into MPa. To determine horsepower, or MPa, connect your wrists to an item that has a known horsepower, such as 4 or 5 horses (which equal approximately 4 or 5 horsepower). Also be certain to connect another part of your body (your ankles will work fine) to a fixed, stationary point. Have an assistant move the horses a know distance over a fixed period of time, an easy suggestion would be 1 meter over 1 second. If your strength cannot be determined with 4 or 5 horses then just increase the number of horses until your ultimate strength is tallied (by counting the number of horses. Next you will obviously need your assistant to calculate your strength to weight ratio by first converting Ml to cm^3, then divide (first they need to convert Hp to Mpa, which shouldn't be hard if you help them before this "experiment" is conducted). The final thing to do is post up the results here, and onto 8a.nu. Hope that helps!


Holy shit! That is the best post I've read on this forum in AGES!!!!!
Kenan
Joined Apr 15, 2010
1,203 points
Apr 17, 2013
25' drop...wheeeeee!
Camp wrote:
What's a KG?


I think it's French for lb.
JesseT
From Portland, OR
Joined May 5, 2011
114 points
Apr 17, 2013
Since we're splitting hairs, prefix names are always lower case. Prefix symbols are only upper case for prefixes greater than 10^6, see Section 6.2.2.

Brendan Blanchard wrote:
The prefix "Kilo" is always capitalized in SI units, so if we were to split hairs, both KG and kg are improper ;) So, 1 Kg = 2.2 lbs.
858jason
Joined Apr 23, 2008
137 points
Administrator
Apr 17, 2013
El Chorro
Over the last 5-6 years I have raised my onsight level by more than a number grade but the number of pull-ups I can do has been cut in half. So either climbing has nothing to do with strength to weight ratio, or pull-ups are a poor way to measure strength to weight. Ryan Williams
From London (sort of)
Joined May 10, 2009
1,468 points


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