Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
How much does your trad rack weigh
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 2.  1  2   Next>   Last>>
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
Apr 25, 2012
I am building a budget rack and i think it is coming out to be pretty heavy. I am wondering what other people's racks are weighing in at. i know that ounces add up to pounds and am curious as to where the weight can be shaved most quickly and most cheaply.
Any imput?
Phil Raymond
From Minneapolis MN
Joined Jan 18, 2012
134 points
Apr 25, 2012
Batman Pinnacle
It depends on where I'm going... Scott O
From California
Joined Mar 30, 2010
25 points
Apr 25, 2012
Batman Pinnacle
Good wiregates are usually a solid bet for shaving weight cheaply. You can usually find bunches of them for sale on the forums here. Scott O
From California
Joined Mar 30, 2010
25 points
Apr 25, 2012
Top half of Melifluous
I shaved half a pound off my runners by switching fom old BD Quicksilvers to Trango Superflys. Kept the Hotires on the rope end but switching 12 biners saved me 8oz. Skinny slings help too. Sam Stephens
Joined Jan 20, 2010
768 points
Administrator
Apr 25, 2012
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
You're about in the same skill range as me Phil. I used to think about the weight of my rack and shaving oz's and what not. Now I kind of look at it like hiking. Yeah, geeking out on the technical side of things is fun, but in the grand scheme doesn't make much difference. The way I look at it, I like to hike, but I'm not ever going to do the AT in a one-season push so dumping extra $$ on super light gear and employing techniques to go with the bare minimum doesn't suit me.

The same with climbing. At our level, a lb or two isn't going to make a difference. At 5.8 or 5.9 if 2lbs, or even 4 is holding you back, you probably just need to get more hours logged, build technique, strength, endurance, what have you. Now, having said that, I can also appreciate not wanting to have a bunch of heavy ass ovals and solid stem friends on my rack.

I don't know your age, or stature or anything else. I do know that if you're just trying to trim a few lbs and feel emboldened a little as a result, the easiest way to do it (and the way that will pay the most dividends) is body weight. If you could stand to lose 5 to 10 lbs, doing so will benefit you much more than shaving a lb or two on your rack.

Also, when you're talking about shaving weight, the lighter/stronger stuff generally costs more. So usually you can shave weight, or shave dollars, but it's rare that the two coincide. Just my $.02 Take it with a grain.
Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Joined Jul 30, 2011
997 points
Administrator
Apr 25, 2012
El Chorro
muttonface wrote:
You're about in the same skill range as me Phil. I used to think about the weight of my rack and shaving oz's and what not. Now I kind of look at it like hiking. Yeah, geeking out on the technical side of things is fun, but in the grand scheme doesn't make much difference. The way I look at it, I like to hike, but I'm not ever going to do the AT in a one-season push so dumping extra $$ on super light gear and employing techniques to go with the bare minimum doesn't suit me. The same with climbing. At our level, a lb or two isn't going to make a difference. At 5.8 or 5.9 if 2lbs, or even 4 is holding you back, you probably just need to get more hours logged, build technique, strength, endurance, what have you. Now, having said that, I can also appreciate not wanting to have a bunch of heavy ass ovals and solid stem friends on my rack. I don't know your age, or stature or anything else. I do know that if you're just trying to trim a few lbs and feel emboldened a little as a result, the easiest way to do it (and the way that will pay the most dividends) is body weight. If you could stand to lose 5 to 10 lbs, doing so will benefit you much more than shaving a lb or two on your rack. Also, when you're talking about shaving weight, the lighter/stronger stuff generally costs more. So usually you can shave weight, or shave dollars, but it's rare that the two coincide. Just my $.02 Take it with a grain.



All excellent advice.
Ryan Williams
From London (sort of)
Joined May 10, 2009
1,468 points
Apr 25, 2012
1. wiregates help ... you dont need to spend $$$$ ... WC nitros are as good as any of the other $$$$ biners ... dont believe the notchless hype for trad ... its not like yr cleaning overhanging bolted routes

2. get good at nut placements ... theyre lighter and it saves cams for pumpy cruxes ... for long moderate routes tricams can also save weight if you like em ... i would of course still have cams generally

3. dyneema slings for draws help ... they are lighter and less bulky ... i just buy the BD ones which are reasonably priced ..

4. i use skinny light draws for both sport and trad, WC nitros are reasonably priced, there are others as well ... it saves money to use something like 6 draws and 6 slings vs buying a while set of slings just for trad

while a bit of weight shouldnt hold back yr climbing ability ... there is utterly no reason why you cant get a fairly "light" setup with the price of modern wiregates that arent the fancy smancy ones ...

the most important thing however is yr brain and skill ... if you have an idea of the route before hand, bring what you need, nothing more ... also the more and better you climb, the less gear you may find you need
bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
1,876 points
Apr 25, 2012
stronger legs = a pack that feels lighter todd w
Joined May 5, 2008
2 points
 
Apr 25, 2012
Myself placing a a blue/yellow offset MC to protec...
the one thing a bout skinny slings is you have to replace them just about twice as often. Lightweight biners on a full rack can save a good bit of weight for a minimall cost increase. On the other hand i like functionality. So for example i dont own the metolius ultralight tcu's because i have a hard time fitting my hands around the trigger and opt for a slightly heavier cam that is more user friendly for me.

Since i rack primarily on my harness the weight just sits on the core and legs where +/- 2 lbs is marginal.

Todd i think hit on the best advice...strong legs = lighter load. something i am constantly reminded of when my chicken legs are trying to haul ass on an approach

T
rock_fencer
From Columbia, SC
Joined Dec 20, 2009
253 points
Apr 25, 2012
OTL
Don't over-rack.
If you have good gear beta for a route - listen to it and bring what you need, not everything and the kitchen sink. If you're swapping leads, anchor with the rope = no cord weight & bulk.
I used to always have my nearly full rack on me (mental comfort thing probably) - the more routes I ended up with leftover gear, the more I tried to plan ahead the next time.
Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Joined Oct 20, 2010
338 points
Apr 25, 2012
You can love your rope but you can't "LOVE&qu...
Weight of trad rack is inversely proportionate to weight of one's balls. If you have steel balls all the better! Lee Smith
Joined Sep 5, 2003
1,686 points
Apr 25, 2012
Grahh! There be a human in my Throne!
I just think of it as weight training! I'm usually not trying to climb near my limit so hiking and climbing with most of my heavy ass rack just helps me get in shape. Or so I'd like to think.
I'm really bad at trying to do climbs with a minimal rack for the route. I'll bring ~12 cams, 8 slings, quick draws, and a biner of cow bells on a climb where I place 3-4 pieces. I always figure its better to have extra gear then run out before the end.
Tim C
From Lakewood, CO
Joined Nov 17, 2007
209 points
Apr 25, 2012
Scott O wrote:
It depends on where I'm going...


Yep. I never bring the whole thing unless I'm aid climbing. When cragging I bring most of it, but then rack for each climb after I eyeball it.

Lee Smith wrote:
Weight of trad rack is inversely proportionate to weight of one's balls. If you have steel balls all the better!


Leaving pieces behind and running it out certainly keeps the rack lighter. In some cases, it's easier that way. Being lighter and less bulky helps the climbing feel easier, and when you place less pieces you don't pump out as fast. Of course, you also want to not get hurt...

Another good technique is to bring smaller pieces when they will work. Sometimes you're climbing a hand-crack, but constrictions and horizontals will take small gear. Some small cams and nuts weight much less than extra hand-size cams, and won't take up good jams. This almost always applies at places like the Gunks - placements abound, so bring smaller, lighter gear and just use the smaller cracks.
Auto-X Fil
From NEPA and Upper Jay, NY
Joined Aug 1, 2010
46 points
Apr 25, 2012
I weighed all my gear for a trip to the Bugaboos. I made an effort to cut some weight. For the plane, I had about 10 lbs of rope and about 10 lbs of carabiners, protection, slings etc. On any given route, I would usually try to bring about half of that gear. At the lightest, that was a half set of nuts, 6 draws, some cord, and about 5 cams. DannyUncanny
From Vancouver
Joined Aug 27, 2010
78 points
Apr 25, 2012
Be careful with the idea of a budget rack--you don't want to sink a few hundred dollars into a rack only to decide you want to upgrade everything with better gear in a year or two. My advice would be to buy good gear, just less of it (which resulted in a fairly terrifying first season for me). In the long term, though, you won't need to buy anything but ropes.

+1 on placing nuts.
Pete Bohler
Joined Jun 4, 2007
0 points
Apr 25, 2012
Skiing around.
I posted this up a little while ago, it may shed some light on rack weight (pun intended). Of course this thread devolved quickly into a conversation about fecal weight....
old camalots vs new camalots
Darren in Vegas
From Las Vegas, NV
Joined Feb 13, 2006
2,147 points
 
Apr 25, 2012
I agree with much of what's been said already.

1. Buy quality gear from the get go. Stay away from the cheap shit, especially when it comes to cams. You want gear that inspires confidence.
2. Skinny runners and cheap wire gates are the way to go as far as I'm concerned. Tripled shoulder length runners are the most versatile. Plus maybe a couple double length runners. I rarely bother with conventional dog bones anymore.
3. Strategically plan your rack according to what you expect to climb that day. Take what you think you'll need plus maybe a few extra pieces. I think most of us start out carrying tons of gear and eventually learn how to plan better. That learning curve is part of the fun and will happen naturally.
Superclimber
Joined Mar 7, 2009
1,501 points
Apr 25, 2012
New Yosemite
Phil Raymond wrote:
I am building a budget rack and i think it is coming out to be pretty heavy. I am wondering what other people's racks are weighing in at. i know that ounces add up to pounds and am curious as to where the weight can be shaved most quickly and most cheaply. Any imput?


Are you talking about weight for a multi-pitch climb where you don't know what to expect, or for single pitch climbs where you can see what you might need and/or have some beta for the climb? It would seem to me that the first scenario is the only one that might stay relatively constant, and in that scenario, I think what everyone else has said sounds spot on; carabiner weight savings add up quickly, particularly with locking carabiners.
Bowens
From Carlsbad, CA
Joined Sep 23, 2011
88 points
May 1, 2012
take the cycling mentality. It is easier to take 5 pounds off of yourself compared to your bike. It is also cheaper. PosiDave
Joined Dec 7, 2011
3 points
May 1, 2012
MY RACK Raze (Taylor)
Joined Dec 31, 2011
7 points
May 1, 2012
Luxury Liner, Indian Creek
Raze (Taylor) wrote:
MY RACK


My sack.








Sorry. Too easy.
Alex Whitman
Joined Sep 30, 2009
276 points
May 1, 2012
not as much as your mom.

j/k. I'm not sure exactly. Fully kitted out it feels about 2/3rds as heavy as my rope, maybe .... 10 lbs? 15?
Jonathan Steitzer
From midcoast, maine
Joined Feb 21, 2010
1,425 points
May 1, 2012
Rock Wars, RRG, 2008
Scott O wrote:
It depends on where I'm going...


Agree. If I"m on an itty bitty thin crack I might have only a couple pounds of small cams, a couple small nuts, few biners. Depends as they say, on length of pitch and danger/comfort level you have for placing the gear. Imagine you could be easily over 10+ pounds with a load of huge cams and 'bros on a wide monster crack. If you are going siege style, use a chest racking harness and maybe plan on retrieving more gear from belayer every now and then.
Woodchuck ATC
Joined Nov 29, 2007
3,090 points
May 2, 2012
SO right now I have:
12 cams
6 tricams
10 nuts
5 lockers
9 draws (5 alpine)
1 grigri
1 atc
All weighing in at 10.2 lbs. Of course I wouldn't be taking all this up every route but I do plan on doing a 10 pitch alpine climb in the near future and I know I will need more stuff.
Additional Question:
Is it customary, necessary, or just convenient to have a racking beaner for every cam? Right now I have 3-4 cams on one large biner and also group my stoppers and tricams according to size. I've seen lots of people group stoppers but never grouping cams. Comments?
Phil Raymond
From Minneapolis MN
Joined Jan 18, 2012
134 points
 
May 2, 2012
Tricams are a great way to add finger to thin hands sized gear for cheap, also they are pretty light. I've found with a little practice they are not that much harder to place than tcus. Dan Bachen
Joined Mar 8, 2010
233 points
May 2, 2012
Here's a discussion about racking multiple cams on a single biner from 2007:
mountainproject.com/v/racking-...

I'm a really new leader (just led a couple routes) so you can't base anything off my experience. But here's my rack:

my new leader rack
my new leader rack


10 quickdraws
14 nuts
8 cams
7 hexes
5 tricams
5 dyneema slings for extending

That rack weighs 9 lbs.

I wouldn't necessarily bring all this on a route, it would depend. I'd also bring a few other items, not shown and not included in the weight: a prusik cord, a cordelette and/or nylon runners, and some extra locking biners for setting up an anchor.
dragons
From Lowell, MA
Joined Aug 19, 2011
542 points


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 2.  1  2   Next>   Last>>
Beyond the Guidebook:
The Definitive Climbing Resource
Inspiration & Motivation
to Fuel Your Run
Next Generation Mountain
Bike Trail Maps
Backcountry, Sidecountry
& Secret Stashes
Better Data. Better Tools.
Better Hikes!