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Got blowtorch?
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By Tradoholic
Jan 6, 2013

www.b3bouldering.com/2013/01/05/blowtorching-wet-boulders/

If you had to, would you?


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By Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Jan 6, 2013
Mathematical!

It seems to me that a blow torch is excessive, but what about those heat guns (that are essentially super powered hair dryers)? Those seem like they might be a good compromise.

Personally though, if I was climbing and the holds were wet, I just wouldn't climb.


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By Tradoholic
Jan 6, 2013

Obviously you have never climbed in the snow. Heat gun, totally inadequate. Are there battery powered ones anyway?


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By Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Jan 6, 2013
Mathematical!

Red Tagger wrote:
Obviously you have never climbed in the snow. Heat gun, totally inadequate. Are there battery powered ones anyway?


No, I don't think there are. It was just a suggestion *shrug*


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By vinny6
From Madison,WI
Jan 6, 2013

Yes! I want to rock climb, and climb as much as possible. If what I want to climb is covered in snow and ice. I WILL shovel it off/out of snow. Melt ice and dry off holds to make it climbable.


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By Reginald McChufferton
Jan 6, 2013

It's usually best to send a bro out the day before and start a huge fire under your proj. Only use dead and downed firewood though. LNT BRO!


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By Dan Felix
Jan 6, 2013

Using a torch to dry rock will weaken the rock. Depending on the type of rock and how high the heat, it can also provide increased texture for gripping (what we call a 'thermal' texture at work), though most typical propane/mapp gas torches aren't capable of that in granite, not sure about softer stone.


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By Mr. Holmes
From Cascade West
Jan 6, 2013
#2

oh boy....here we go...
It seems to me the same argument can (and has)been made of drills. Any yahoo can purchase a Bosch and "put up a route". The stupidity of one affects many thus it is crucial that climbing areas continue to be honored as unique and that one rule cannot always apply to all. This makes it paramount that these climbing resources be
"self-regulated" by the local crew of developers, regulars, and land managers. Climbing management plans can put all this to rest if/as climbers organize to preserve their climbing environments.


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By vinny6
From Madison,WI
Jan 6, 2013

Lets call a spade a spade here people. "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction" Say 10 climbers go out and climb the same problem 100 times and on the 101st time they climb it a hold breaks. Was it the fact they climbed it too much? Or maybe they put on weight? Or maybe it's there was always an unseen weakness not visible to the human eye. Either way at some point in time that piece of rock was going to come off, either naturally, or at the hands of man. Is it really such a horrible act to dry off a hold, top out, or climb with a torch? Is it actually making a drastic impact on the rock? Have you seen a climb/boulder ruined by said act? What about drilling and blasting a hole through the side of a mountain to build a tunnel so as to drive through, or destroying a farmland or forest to build ones "dream home". These things seem to me at least to be a bigger impact on environment than drying a hold off.


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By Dan Felix
Jan 6, 2013

It is noted in the Rumney guidebook that a hold broke on a boulder problem due to the first ascentionist drying the rock with a torch, which then made the problem a grade harder.

Yes, drying with high heat (flame) *will* weaken the rock, regardless of any natural imperfections that otherwise exist.


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By vinny6
From Madison,WI
Jan 6, 2013

noted: Do note take flame to pile of schist.


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By Travis Dustin
From Hollis, NH
Jan 6, 2013
NH

As someone who works with rocks for a living I can tell you heating them up with a torch will weaken, crack or take off layers changing the texture/features of the stone.


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By Dan Felix
Jan 6, 2013

Travis Dustin wrote:
As someone who works with rocks for a living I can tell you heating them up with a torch will weaken, crack or take off layers changing the texture/features of the stone.

You a mason? I'm a landscaper in the Lakes Region. I work with stone enough to know what heat does, not sure why people would think it's a good idea for climbing....


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By Tradoholic
Jan 6, 2013

Just because something is heated and then brakes doesn't make heat the culprit, just a suspect.

I think if I feel a particular hold is fragile I wouldn't blow torch it, or if I thought the blow torch would mark the rock I wouldn't do it either but overall I think the risk of blow torching is vastly overstated.

I've personally blow torched the shit out of some top outs and there were no marks, the texture didn't change, and there was nothing to break because it was big rounded top out. This was on rare quartzite however. So, try it out on a piece of the type of rock you are climbing on and see what happens. If it messes it up, don't do it on the climbs but my guess is that nothing will happen.

Tip: Bring a towel to sop up melting ice.


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By Ben Beckerich
From saint helens, oregon
Jan 6, 2013
About half way up the East Arete on Illumination Rock

I can't believe I didn't think of this myself..

Anybody ever put shoulder straps on a 5-gallon propane bottle?


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By Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Jan 6, 2013
Cleo's Needle

I find myself struggling to care that a little fire was applied to a pile of rocks. But then again I find bouldering tedious and I couldn't muster the interest to watch the video.


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By Ben Beckerich
From saint helens, oregon
Jan 6, 2013
About half way up the East Arete on Illumination Rock

Ray Pinpillage wrote:
I find myself struggling to care that a little fire was applied to a pile of rocks. But then again I find bouldering tedious and I couldn't muster the interest to watch the video.


Fuck bouldering. But this would work great on the short routes at Rocky Butte


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By TWK
Jan 6, 2013

Why would anyone bother with this?

If it's wet, go do something else; there are so many things to do, so many activities to engage in that are appropriate for any given condition.

If it's wet, climb it wet. Or find something else to do.


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By Tradoholic
Jan 7, 2013

TWK wrote:
Why would anyone bother with this? If it's wet, go do something else; there are so many things to do, so many activities to engage in that are appropriate for any given condition. If it's wet, climb it wet. Or find something else to do.


Nothing else compares to climbing. You sir, are not Midwest Hardcore.


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By AnthonyM
Jan 7, 2013
Maroon Bells-Bell Cord Couloir

Reginald McChufferton wrote:
It's usually best to send a bro out the day before and start a huge fire under your proj. Only use dead and downed firewood though. LNT BRO!



This is a joke right??? If not please explain how you haven't burned down everything in your area.

If it is-you had the desired affect and I would encourage you to post/comment more.


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By Alex McIntyre
From Tucson, AZ
Jan 7, 2013

There has been at least one climbing area utterly demolished by a wildfire coming into contact with the rock, if not more. Why is ANYONE surprised that extreme heat will weaken rock?

mountainproject.com/v/cochiti-mesa/105891776


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By Travis Dustin
From Hollis, NH
Jan 7, 2013
NH

Dan Felix wrote:
You a mason? I'm a landscaper in the Lakes Region. I work with stone enough to know what heat does, not sure why people would think it's a good idea for climbing....


I am the foreman at the Stoneyard in littleton ms. We sort stone, cut thin veneer and some bluestone and granite work


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By J Q
Jan 7, 2013
Me again!

Absolutely loving the irony of the hard core Midwestern ethicist using blow torches on rock. LOL!! Are you kidding?


Bolts: definitely not OK.
Pre-hung draws: not OK.
Being a sport climber: not OK


Flamethrowers on the rock: the preferred pastime of many!


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By MJMobes
From The land of steady habits
Jan 7, 2013
modern man

this is how its done in CT bro

youtu.be/cnDnkdg7sPA


this same guy on vimeo sculpting, see it at 3:10 and 4:25-

#


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By Jason N.
From Grand Junction
Jan 7, 2013
Indy pass

vinny6 wrote:
Lets call a spade a spade here people. "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction" Say 10 climbers go out and climb the same problem 100 times and on the 101st time they climb it a hold breaks. Was it the fact they climbed it too much? Or maybe they put on weight? Or maybe it's there was always an unseen weakness not visible to the human eye. Either way at some point in time that piece of rock was going to come off, either naturally, or at the hands of man. Is it really such a horrible act to dry off a hold, top out, or climb with a torch? Is it actually making a drastic impact on the rock? Have you seen a climb/boulder ruined by said act? What about drilling and blasting a hole through the side of a mountain to build a tunnel so as to drive through, or destroying a farmland or forest to build ones "dream home". These things seem to me at least to be a bigger impact on environment than drying a hold off.


Think you're missing the point here. It's not about environmental impact really, a couple holds breaking off of some random boulders is pretty minuscule. Only in the context of climbing is it a big deal, because losing holds can dramatically change climbs.


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By TWK
Jan 7, 2013

Red Tagger wrote:
Nothing else compares to climbing. You sir, are not Midwest Hardcore.


Hilarious!
But, I guess you're right. Here in California, we just ski until the warm sun dries out the granite. I guess I'll just never be "Midwest Hardcore".

But isn't that an oxymoron?


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