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Friend dropped from 60 ft.
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By Rick Blair
From Denver
Aug 1, 2013
This is a novel auto blocking belay device.  I think it works quite well, depending on rope thickness and sheath quality, it belays very smooth.  Great to lower with.  You gotta love over engineering.  $3 at a gear swap!

Timothy.Klein wrote:
So you fell 60 feet, evacuated yourself, and the rode to the hospital on the back of a stranger's Harley? That's pretty bad ass. Hope you recover fully.

Not to make light of your situation but that is one awesome story. Hope you heal up quickly, definitely one of my heroes now.


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By doug rouse
From Denver, CO.
Aug 1, 2013

Whatever happened to stitch plates? No confusion as to how they work, and a hell of alot cheaper than a grigri. If they show up with one, that may be a red flag..When climbing with unknowns, take your own safety into account, and ensure that your partner displays proper usage of any device. It may offend some, but it still beats cratering!


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By climbnplay
Aug 1, 2013

so it was established through your conversation with the belayer at the hospital that he in fact did not know how to use the Gri-Gri? If that's the case, shame on him for not letting you know.

a couple of questions, though.
1) to me, the logical thing to do - if i have any doubts about a communication with the belayer, would be to go directly into the anchor and then sort it out with the person from there. i would never start lowering myself on the rope because i think the belayer hasn't caught on and i just want to get to the ground. were you in a hurry?

2)was the belayer in a position where you could not hear or see him?


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By Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Aug 1, 2013
OTL

Lesson: Sport climbing with people from the internet is dangerous. Stick to multi and you have a better chance of living.




Dang, glad you survived a shitty partner!


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By David Sahalie
From on the road again
Aug 1, 2013

doug rouse wrote:
Whatever happened to stitch plates? No confusion as to how they work, and a hell of alot cheaper than a grigri. If they show up with one, that may be a red flag..When climbing with unknowns, take your own safety into account, and ensure that your partner displays proper usage of any device. It may offend some, but it still beats cratering!


What happened to them? They went away because they suck. And they absolutely are in no way shape or form a substitute for a gri. Hip belays on the other hand. ..


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By Allen Sanderson
From Oootah
Aug 1, 2013

Yikes, this accident sounds similar what happened to a friend. Except her belayer, who claimed to be experienced and was not as he set a top rope yet ran the rope directly through the slings. Further, the climbing outing was a date and the guy was married. She was pretty banged up and ended up suing the douche bag - and she did get a settlement.

Hope ya heal well.


David Sahalie wrote:
What happened to them [stitch plates]? They went away because they suck. And they absolutely are in no way shape or form a substitute for a gri. Hip belays on the other hand. ..


Baloney, stitch plates are still around just in a different form. BD calls them ATCs, Trango calls them Jaws. And yes, they are perfectly adequate and often better than a gri-gri or cinch. The problem is that people learn on one device and then if they loose it they are screwed. There have been several cases of folks getting stuck cause they lost their rappel device yet had enough biners to make a biner brake but did not know how. I bet half the people on MP would be in the same position.


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By Tom-o Sapien
From World's largest trailer park
Aug 1, 2013
Conky and I confront Patrick Swayze

Allen Sanderson wrote:
The problem is that people learn on one device and then if they loose it they are screwed. There have been several cases of folks getting stuck cause they lost their rappel device yet had enough biners to make a biner brake but did not know how. I bet half the people on MP would be in the same position.


I always thought that a biner brake rappel could only be safely made with oval biners. Try finding one on any sport climber's rack.
Then I came across this tech tip using solid gated non ovals.
Painfully slow, one can always rely on the Dülfersitz in a pinch.
Learn and practice these as well as the body belay.

Glad Scott is doing better!


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By Red
From Arizona
Aug 1, 2013
Cobra Kai

Timothy.Klein wrote:
So you fell 60 feet, evacuated yourself, and the rode to the hospital on the back of a stranger's Harley? That's pretty bad ass. Hope you recover fully.

+1 well said. I hope you have a fast and full recovery Scott!


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By Rick Blair
From Denver
Aug 1, 2013
This is a novel auto blocking belay device.  I think it works quite well, depending on rope thickness and sheath quality, it belays very smooth.  Great to lower with.  You gotta love over engineering.  $3 at a gear swap!

Tom-o Erectus wrote:
Dülfersitz in a pinch.

Holy Crap! This isn't the 1930s. Rap with a munter and save your balls from rope burn.


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By Brad White
Aug 1, 2013

"What happened to them? They went away because they suck. And they absolutely are in no way shape or form a substitute for a gri. Hip belays on the other hand. .."


What Allen said in response to this silly statement above . .

I always thought that one of the supposed advantages of a grigri is that they are idiot-proof for belayers. Sure seems to be a lot of accidents with them.

I've always found that the use of a simple, intuitive device such as an ATC, along with some good explanation and practice is the best way to teach a beginner how to belay safely. I like using a grigri in certain situations, but there are certain aspects about them that are not intuitive, and they are clearly not a good substitute for knowing the basics of belaying.

I'd take a hip belay from someone that knows what they're doing, over a belay from a grigri from someone that does not know how to properly belay any day. .


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By BrandonChalifoux
From Lebanon, NH
Aug 1, 2013

Seems to me an unconscious belayer may have been a more effective belayer in this case.

Best wishes and full recovery, Scott.


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By Red
From Arizona
Aug 1, 2013
Cobra Kai

Tom-o Erectus wrote:
I agree Red, but.. To tie into a rope's end is an unwritten contract to share a LIFE LINE with a partner. Your life is in my hands equally as my life is in yours. Too many people seem to take this lightly. Do we no longer stress this importance when teaching newcomers our passion? Hubris? Naivety? Wishing Scott a speedy recovery

I agree Tom and I stress this with newcomers. Unfortunately, it seems too many newcomers don't get a safe and experienced mentor.
Maybe some newbies just don't understand the seriousness of what they are getting their selves into. Keeping their partner alive and safe.


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By Brian in SLC
Aug 1, 2013
Climbing in Smuggler's Notch

Scott Jones wrote:
Unfortunately the traffic was bumper to bumper, but luck would have it that man on a harley was passing by, so i hopped on.


Bad ass, and, invalid without pictures...

Wow. Glad you're going to be (relatively) ok.


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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Aug 1, 2013
Bocan

Brian in SLC wrote:
Bad ass, and, invalid without pictures... Wow. Glad you're going to be (relatively) ok.


Scott's face pic is on the CU Alpine Club FB page...he got pretty banged up.

Get well soon Scott!


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By Greg Springer
From Minneapolis
Aug 1, 2013
Friends big puppy

chuck claude wrote:
sorry to hear that Scott, did I hear that correctly. Your so called belayer dropped you and you self-evac'ed and got yourself tyo the hospital. What was the so called belayer doing. He should have been busting ass to get you out of there


After being dropped to my potential death I think i would refuse any but the most life-saving help from the belayer.

Speedy recovery Scott, I respect the way and OP have handled this e-situation


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By Brian in SLC
Aug 1, 2013
Climbing in Smuggler's Notch

Scott McMahon wrote:
Scott's face pic is on the CU Alpine Club FB page...he got pretty banged up. Get well soon Scott!


Ouch...that's gnarly!


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By RobC2
Aug 1, 2013
This..

Sounds like he had the rope in the Grigri backwards? I always make a visual check of the belayer's set-up to be sure the rope is threaded correctly. Have caught this error a time or two this way...


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By teece303
From Highlands Ranch, CO
Aug 1, 2013
Aiding.

I love my Gri Gri, and I am 100% certain that when I'm belaying you with my Gri Gri, you are safer than when I'm using my slot device. (If I get hit in the head by a rock, the Gri Gri has a chance of locking up. An unconscious Tim does not, etc.).

But I am constantly amazed at how the universe keeps building people that can manage to screw up belaying with a Gri Gri. *shakes head ruefully*

I mean we upped the complication from hunk of metal, to hunk of metal with a hinged hunk of metal on it. Is that really enough to blow people's minds? I guess so.

As long as you look at the pretty picture to thread the rope right (and respect rope diameter), and you don't *purposely* defeat the cam action, the damn thing works almost without your help! Whattahey.


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By doligo
Aug 1, 2013
Jose Cuervo Fruitcups dirtbag style

RobC2 wrote:
Sounds like he had the rope in the Grigri backwards? I always make a visual check of the belayer's set-up to be sure the rope is threaded correctly. Have caught this error a time or two this way...


My understanding is he pulled the lever and had the braking hand off the rope.

Gri-gris are an advanced device, I would rather a beginner belay me with an ATC and wear gloves. I think Mammut Smart is a better suited belay device for beginners - it really takes an effort to lower.


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Aug 1, 2013
...

"Seems to me an unconscious belayer may have been a more effective belayer in this case.".



LMAO!


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By Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
Aug 1, 2013
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Peak.

Come on, post up some hospital pics. I wish I had done that from the ER a few weeks ago.


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By teece303
From Highlands Ranch, CO
Aug 1, 2013
Aiding.

If you search for the CU alpine club on Facebook, Tim, you can see the gnar.


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By RobC2
Aug 2, 2013
This..

doligo wrote:
My understanding is he pulled the lever and had the braking hand off the rope. Gri-gris are an advanced device, I would rather a beginner belay me with an ATC and wear gloves. I think Mammut Smart is a better suited belay device for beginners - it really takes an effort to lower.


Who ascertained this was the malfunction? This guy?


--- Invalid image id: 108269756 ---

He had to be severely concussed so his ability to undertake any evaluation of what happened was pretty minimal at the time or even later. Likely the " belayer" didn't even understand what he had done...

Even if the guy had the lever down on a Grigri 2 a rapid lower not a free- fall would ensue ( see video below). If the rope is backwards in the Grigri the belayer CANNOT arrest the fall. CHECK YOUR GUY'S RIG BEFORE YOU LEAVE THE GROUND!!! HAVE HIM/HER CHECK YOURS!!!

www.dailymotion.com/video/x50vsu_grigri-belaying-the-leader_>>>


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By bearbreeder
Aug 2, 2013

A panicked belayer with a fully open gri gri will drop someone

As will a panicked belayer who blocked the cam

Seems like a few MPer are looking to spread a bit of blame

;)


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By Rick Mix
From Nederland, Colorado
Aug 2, 2013

Sorry about your bad luck, Scott. Hope you have a speedy recovery. And as mentioned earlier you self rescued and all, Where the hell was dude?


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