Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
EMTs and paramedics – what do you carry?
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 2 of 5.  <<First   <Prev   1  2  3  4  5   Next>   Last>>
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
By s.price
From PS,CO
Jul 23, 2013
 Morning Dew ,self portrait
Not an EMT but I am a WFR. My kit is very similar to Jace Mullens but I also carry an epi(mostly for me) and instead of ibuprofen I carry cheeba chews. Great pain reliever (especially if you eat the whole thing) and tasty with none of the negatives of ibuprofen.
And duct tape. Always duct tape.

FLAG
By Rob Fielding
From Las Vegas, NV
Jul 23, 2013
Third pillar of dana descent.
The first aid supply list people are bringing up is absurd...

For traumatic injuries, the only thing you can really do outdoors is stop the bleeding and offer pain medications. Quick clot, knife, climbing tape, and pain meds. You can easily make a tourniquet out of a sling or strap on your back pack.

Really, what you need is some type of spot device to call SAR if someone is really badly injured so they can get to a trauma surgeon as quickly as possible, bandaging/splinting isn't going to do anything, just a waste of weight on your back.

FLAG
By Davi Rivas
From Ventura, CA
Jul 23, 2013
Davi Rivas on the U-Notch, Palisades, 06/06/2011
EMT-P RN CCRN

Lots of awesome suggestions here. But the best suggestion posted is to stay within your scope bro. Don't pack stuff you don't know how to use, don't pack meds your not 100% about.
Start there and keep it simple. As you gain more experience and training, you can add to your kit. But let your skills dictate what you pack.
If you plan for every type of emergency that you may encounter in the back country, your ruck will be full of rescue gear, leaving little room for camping and climbing gear.
In my opinion, your ability to assess risk and your escape plan (in case you or one of your party actually do get hurt), will serve you better than a ton of trauma supplies. I don't say that to discourage. In fact, I think every climber should have some kind of a kit, not jus the doctors, nurses and medics who climb. I also think every climber should have some kind of medical training; basic first aide and a CPR card will do.
For what it's worth, I have a fully equipped 'jump bag', complete with AMBU bags(adult and peds), an OB kit, meds, IV start kits, a few liters of NS, a ton of trauma supplies and a D size O2 cylinder. But that bad boy stays in my truck back at camp or the trailhead.
In my ruck, I have sterile gauze, some 4inch bandage rolls, snips, tweezers, cloth tape, a sterile 20ml syringe(for wound irrigation), an Emergency Blanket, Tylenol, Motrin, Benedryl, Neo-Sporin and 4-5 packets of GU. That's it.

FLAG
By Donald Kerabatsos
Jul 23, 2013
If you are out in the back country and definitive treatment is potentially 3+ to even 24+ hours away climbing tape and a knife are great but limited. There is a whole world of possibilities between life threatening trauma and minor trauma that you can treat with a few extra supplies. You can absolutely get by with climbing tape and a knife but you could do so much more with minimal added weight. You can do a lot more than 'just stop the bleeding'.

If someone has a large laceration you can minimize bleeding, irrigate it, cover it with neosporin and a steril bandage. If it is on a spot that has significant tension, steri-strips can help keep it closed. You could just put a dirty t-shirt and climbing tape on it, but the supplies needed for better care weigh maybe half a pound total.

If someone has a fracture or sprain, you can mold a SAM splint to fit just about any body part easily, quickly, and effectively with minimal equipment. A SAM is less bulky than an improvised splint, more comfortable, fewer pressure points, better support, 'dummy' proof (directions are printed right on the side) in case you aren't the one making the splint, cheap, and light weight. On top of that, you don't have to mess with cut up webbing, back packs, pads, and you get to wear your shirt out. A 36" SAM costs about 10$, weighs 1/3 lb., and can be bought rolled or folded so you can fit it in your pack however you want.

Edit: Davi brings up a good point. Electrolite pack for ORT of some sort should be in there. I have emergen-C but there are tons of good ones out there.

I also sometimes put in general survival stuff. Some fishing line, hooks, a few caddis flies, dry tender, matches, iodine.

FLAG
By CodyL
From North Carolina
Jul 23, 2013
Ill carry everything from SAM splints, self heating blankets for cold weather, tons of gauze/tape/kt tape/gloves, IV bags/starter kits, gauze, NPA hose just in case, basic MEDS, 18/20 GA needles.You don't need to bring the kitchen sink, just plan what you need for a day/multi day/back packing/ etc etc. When I am just on a day climb ill carry a EMT responder fanny pack basically with everything I need. If I'm doing more then ill pack more. Medical skills are very perishable IMO, not only is it important to have the right supplies but you see people buying these kits and not knowing how to use everything in it.

FLAG
By Patrick Vernon
From Albuquerque, NM
Jul 23, 2013
mexico
Crash cart, vent, attending on speed dial and neosporin.

FLAG
By Buff Johnson
Jul 23, 2013
smiley face
harry potter wand

FLAG
By Patrick Vernon
From Albuquerque, NM
Jul 23, 2013
mexico
A roll of elven mithril for quick clotting and patching up wounds.

FLAG
 
By i.reynaud
From Long Beach, Ca
Jul 23, 2013
Claim Jumper
This was taken out of a wilderness first responder training text.
Page 1
Page 1

FLAG
By i.reynaud
From Long Beach, Ca
Jul 23, 2013
Claim Jumper
Page 2
Page 2

FLAG
By i.reynaud
From Long Beach, Ca
Jul 23, 2013
Claim Jumper
--- Invalid image id: 108255800 ---

FLAG
By i.reynaud
From Long Beach, Ca
Jul 23, 2013
Claim Jumper
Best advice from this book is to bring what you have knowledge of and are comfortable using.

FLAG
By chuffnugget
From Bolder, CO
Jul 24, 2013
Dehydrated water. Suriously tho, tea tree oil is so much better than triple antibiotics.

FLAG
By manuel rangel
From Tempe, Arizona
Jul 24, 2013
I'll stick with Dean's kit: "Benadryl, Epi pen, and tape" plus add a knife and latex/nitrile gloves. If I can't fix it with this, you're in need of real help. That's when I use my 28 years of experience as an EMT and call 911 ASAP.

You can drag a ton of stuff up the wall but then what will you be doing, climbing or medicating. Nobody is expected to perform miracles wherever they go and I haven't had to use more than the gear I have, thank god.

Do what you can to stabilize the person and keep them comfortable until help arrives. If you are far from help; good luck.

FLAG
By Jake D.
From Northeast
Jul 24, 2013
I think it's funny that people are so into bringing Neosporin.. you're going to be getting home that day right? you're not going to get an infection in a few hours.. how many times do you get a flapper or smash your finger and just shove chalk in it and keep climbing.

I find the large kits here amusing too. as an Athletic trainer i'm basically in the same position as WFR with easier ambulance access. The things I use on a regular basis are what are in my bag. gauze, steri strips, white tape, duct tape, band aids, moleskin, pocket knife, safety pin, mylar blanket, benadryl, advil.

You're not going to save the world.. only pack what you need. NOLS thinks otherwise and if you look at all of their gear suggestions you get packs around 50lbs of crap. I laughed at a guy on the LT who pulled out this 2lb tri fold FAK that had more crap than my work kit.

As a fairly ultralight backpacker weight is always a concern and being able to do a lot with a little is important. This is my FAK I took on the Long Trail (280mi) thru hike in Vermont.

in the tube is advil, i changed out the kidney shaped blister things for moleskin, mylar blanket added later, triangle bandage removed.
2-3oz

FLAG
By Paul Hutton
From Jacksonville, NC
Jul 24, 2013
Stokolm, Messina, Sicily.
Active duty Navy Corpsman x3 years of service. Currently deployed with Engineer Marines in Afghanistan. Been climbing for 2 years.

I once saw a kid take a ground fall at a gym: ankle pain with inflammation. I forgot to pack the SAM splint, so all I could do was elevate his leg (which doesn't do much, but it factors in a lil to slow inflammation, thus, reduce pain). When I got back in from lookin in my car I found that bystanders had worked together to improvise a splint, but it was a messy job and they had ice packs wrapped up inside of the splint material lol! I imagine that patient felt the weight on his foot. Wish I'd had the SAM splint.

STOP using quik clot powder! It generates heat, which can burn tissue inside of the wound, including mucous membranes like eyes, nose, mouth, and it can be a nightmare for doctors to clean out. Look for gauze impregnated with "KAOLIN" hemostatic agent. If you're dealing with a large wound, the gauze must be stuffed up in there. Don't be shy-- the average adult can bleed out in seconds to a few minutes.

Anti-inflammatory meds are great, Marines ask for it all the time. Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Mobic. The Epi-pen can be a life-saver--I get the stories about climbers grabbing for pockets and getting bitten/stung by something. The epinephrine is a bronchiodilator and vasoconstrictor, so it'll reverse airway inflammation and compensate for hypovolemia, the cause of shock (in this case, anaphylactic shock). Pressure dressings--the packaged trauma dressings are great, but you can improvise, plus lighten the load and save space with some rolls of gauze (if treating an extremity, start furthest from the torso and wrap towards the torso. Compressed gauze is awesome!). Nasopharyngeal airway adjuncts can be a life-saver when working with an unconscious victim. If I explain every item I throw on this post, it could get really long, so start googling if you don't understand. Antibiotic ointment: infection CAN spread quickly, as not everyone has a strong immune system. Duct tape, medical tape. If you're gonna carry steri strips, have tincture of benzoin/iodine so you're prepared to close up a hairy wound.. On that note, carry a razor. Trauma shears are great, they can cut through a leather boot. Moleskin. Emergency blanket-- a combination of bleeding and hypothermia will prevent blood clotting. Knowing how to treat fractures and bleeding isn't everything, know how to identify and EFFICIENTLY treat heat and cold injuries. Coban can make bandaging cleaner and easier, it sticks to itself. Elastic wrap for joint injuries-- again, distal to proximal on extremeties.

If you wanna be motivated, look up how to perform a cricothyroidotomy-- it's not difficult, you can improvise the rigid airway with a number of things, and don't lack confidence about learning and DOING. If the poor guy/gal you're working on isn't breathing, the head tilt chin lift and/or jaw-thrust maneuver doesn't work and you can't get chest rise/fall with CPR and you can't see a foreign object in their mouth, they're gonna die. It's best just to try the cric. You'll increase the chance of survival if you can get something through that membrane. IV set with a bag of LR or NS can help treat massive blood loss both internally and externally, special training required.

When you're as passionate about treating trauma as I am, you don't mind carrying gear. The more you have, the more prepared you feel. Then there's no question about what to carry. Being so skilled and able to improvise is great, but the moment that you knock someone else for having more supplies than you do makes you a douche! I've been a victim of the jokes, but there have been times outside the wire when another Corpsman would need something and I had it, and vice versa. First responders help each other, don't cut each other down. Situations vary, and they're constantly changing as the seconds tick by. Two heads working together are better than one. It's better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

Don't panic! It'll make the victim panic. Save lives! OORAH!

FLAG
 
By chris_vultaggio
Jul 24, 2013
Chris Vultaggio leads the title route at Five and Dime in Yosemite. <br /> <br />Photo by Bill Roehrich
EMT with an herbalist GF.

Waterproof kit with BSI, tape, bandages/gauze. Ibuprofen, Vicodin, benadryll, tweezers, tick-remover, triangular bandages, antibiotic and sterilization wipes. Notepad for SAMPLE etc. marker for notes/marking envemomations, tourniquet time.

No splints or tourniquets, I can make them with slings/clothes, packs. Ginger chews (stomach aches and diabetics).

GF has taught me to keep an eye out for things like yarrow, witch's hair, osha, and other stuff.

FLAG
By Jake D.
From Northeast
Jul 24, 2013
ahhh.. love type A EMT folks who think they will save the world. But can't do it without a truck full of gear.

spout off all the of the emergency care techniques that you know but in reality the chances of needing any of it are extremely small. I've been climbing for 14 years and the most i've needed to do is steri strip a laceration in camp and tape someone's ankle after a lead fall. If I saw someone carrying an IV kit in their crag bag I would laugh my ass off. I climbed for a bunch of those years with a Combat medic(ret)/paramedic and he had none of that shit.

telling lay people to learn basically surgical techniques? HA Good Samaritan law doesn't go that far.. you screw up and you're fucked.

A few years ago I was almost in a head on collision with a SAR rescue jeep that was going 60+mph down the single-ish lane access road to Muir Valley at RRG. He was so hopped up on being badass rescue man he turned his brain off to the fact that he was putting others in danger. After I stopped laying on my horn I pulled up to tell him to slow the fuck down and his eyes were like Mel Gibson in Lethal Weapon.

FLAG
By Patrick Vernon
From Albuquerque, NM
Jul 24, 2013
mexico
Far more important than most of the gear listed is a basic knowledge of A+P and Patho of trauma injuries. Most equipment can be improvised. The thought of over zealous people wandering the backcountry with Iv start kits ready to bolus someone having an attack of seasonal allergies with stream water kind of scares me.

FLAG
By Jake D.
From Northeast
Jul 24, 2013
PatrickV wrote:
Far more important than most of the gear listed is a basic knowledge of A+P and Patho of trauma injuries. Most equipment can be improvised. The thought of over zealous people wandering the backcountry with Iv start kits kind of scares me.


the people improvising splints in a gym when EMS is on the way scares me too.. If you don't know what you're doing, leave people alone and let professionals do it.

FLAG
By Paul Hutton
From Jacksonville, NC
Jul 24, 2013
Stokolm, Messina, Sicily.
Jake D. wrote:
ahhh.. love type A EMT folks who think they will save the world. But can't do it without a truck full of gear. spout off all the of the emergency care techniques that you know but in reality the chances of needing any of it are extremely small. I've been climbing for 14 years and the most i've needed to do is steri strip a laceration in camp and tape someone's ankle after a lead fall. If I saw someone carrying an IV kit in their crag bag I would laugh my ass off. I climbed for a bunch of those years with a Combat medic(ret)/paramedic and he had none of that shit. telling lay people to learn basically surgical techniques? HA Good Samaritan law doesn't go that far.. you screw up and you're fucked. A few years ago I was almost in a head on collision with a SAR rescue jeep that was going 60+mph down the single-ish lane access road to Muir Valley at RRG. He was so hopped up on being badass rescue man he turned his brain off to the fact that he was putting others in danger. After I stopped laying on my horn I pulled up to tell him to slow the fuck down and his eyes were like Mel Gibson in Lethal Weapon.

If the Navy didn't teach me everything I know now because the chances of me running into every scenario that I could possibly handle were slim, then what would the world be like? I live amongst civilians, too. I stop by traffic accidents, where emergency responders haven't showed up yet, to ask if anyone's hurt. I keep a med kit in my car. Anyone can run their vehicle head on into someone else, but not everyone can respond in scenarios without advice from experienced professionals (so that professional you dealt with is just another dude until he arrives to the scene). I just contributed. Can you tell me that you know that none of the people's advice on here that you've cut down is valuable?

FLAG
By Paul Hutton
From Jacksonville, NC
Jul 24, 2013
Stokolm, Messina, Sicily.
Jake D. wrote:
the people improvising splints in a gym when EMS is on the way scares me too.. If you don't know what you're doing, leave people alone and let professionals do it.

This is in regard to my original post? Didn't think I'd need to include that his friends transported him to the hospital. Now I've got ppl thinking they can help me with my stories. I was trying to keep my post short so as not to steal the thread, entirely. I thought i could possibly shed some light on things that hadn't been covered, yet. I applaude the cric procedure cuz I've done it before and it worked, just like instructors said it would. I say the things I say for a reason, cuz I've seen people dying right in front of me before. I love climbing, partly cuz ppl offer advice and try to befriend and help each other out. So the positive, constructive, non stubborn people on here that have witnessed the members that don't follow Guideline #1-- take note of those individuals, and try to avoid them. They don't know what to do in a serious situation.

FLAG
By Buff Johnson
Jul 24, 2013
smiley face
don't forget a therapy dog named shithead

FLAG
By Jake D.
From Northeast
Jul 24, 2013
Carrying a trauma bag around to the crag with you waiting for something to happen is silly. Having it in your car available is not. plus you're more likely to be in an accident on the road than on the rock.

you'll notice i'm not the only one saying that carrying the ER with you isn't necessary..

And that SAR's experience would be useless if we had crashed and caused a more serious accident. Then there would be 2 accidents and one less responder.

To be called an EMT it takes a few weeks.. to be called WFR it takes a few days. So I am always amused that people hold credentials in such high regard.

Edit:
Oh please.. you're going to go off on a "look how hardcore i am, i'm a medic blah blah" then hide behind Rule #1 lol

All I said was you don't need the kitchen sink. you can be all sensitive about it if you want but you don't need all that gear. And you shouldn't tell people to perform surgery that will get them sued.

FLAG
 
By Jason Todd
From Ranchester, WY
Jul 24, 2013
Moss
Ready for EVERY contingency.

Jump Kit
Jump Kit

FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 2 of 5.  <<First   <Prev   1  2  3  4  5   Next>   Last>>