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easy trad climbs
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By Jon Powell
From LAWRENCEVILLE GEORGIA
Feb 12, 2013
stone depot

Any suggestions on some easy trad climbs (5.6 to 5.8) that could be top roped? What I am wanting to do is set up a top rope and be able to practice placing pro.


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By todd w
Feb 12, 2013

This place looks good:


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By Jon Powell
From LAWRENCEVILLE GEORGIA
Feb 12, 2013
stone depot

Real helpful thanks


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By snicho
From Boulder, CO
Feb 12, 2013
me on Binou's Crack in Indian Creek

where?


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By Jon Powell
From LAWRENCEVILLE GEORGIA
Feb 12, 2013
stone depot

I'm in Georgia but any where that the Southeast Forum covers


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By Greg Berry
Feb 12, 2013

Sandrock AL


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By Jon Powell
From LAWRENCEVILLE GEORGIA
Feb 12, 2013
stone depot

Greg Berry wrote:
Sandrock AL

I'm pretty familiar with Sandrock but I stick to the sport routes. Any particular trad routes that you can set up a top rope?


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By Jon Powell
From LAWRENCEVILLE GEORGIA
Feb 12, 2013
stone depot

And just for the record I am not a beginner climber. I am just new to trad and trying to learn things the safe way rather than getting myself or someone else hurt. Lots of guys like Todd W that like to give people a hard time on mountain project rather than help out a fellow climber. Some people forget that they didn't know everything at one point in their life. For the rest of you thanks.


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By Logan Schiff
From NY, NY
Feb 12, 2013

Why not start by practicing placing pro on some of the sport routes your familiar with? I'm sure some take decent pro.

I've never been to Linville Gorge (hope to at some point), but it looks like they have lots of nice looking easy and moderate trad climbs. Not sure about the feasibility of setting up on TR.


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By Adam Paashaus
From Greensboro, North Carolina
Feb 12, 2013
After you get done climbing be sure to head up to the summit for sunset. Its only a 10 minute walk from the main wall. Don't forget your headlamp.

you could practice pro at Pilot Mountain in NC. The whole cliff-line is equipped with top rope anchors. I imagine you could do the same at Crowders Mountain though I dont have experience there. There is also TR anchors at the Chimneys at Linville gorge.


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By TomCaldwell
From Clemson, S.C.
Feb 12, 2013
Me on One Pitch Wonder at Whitesides.  Photo credits to Kyle Jones and his lucky anti-rain jacket.

There are quite a few areas in Ga that offer what you are looking for. Check out Currahee in Toccoa. Everything there is TR'able. The slab wall and Buzzard wall both have some moderates that are protectable by gear and bolts, but also have anchors at the top.

Mt. Yonah near Helen also has a lot of options to TR'ing trad climbs. The 2-man climbs, even though they are bolted, gear can be placed. The Balance climb area has the cable that runs to the top and over every trad route there. Also, you can hike to the top of the main wall and drop ropes where ever you like.

Check out the Dixie Craggers Alabama and Georgia for a guide book.


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By Br'er Rabbit
From The Deeper South
Feb 12, 2013
'Bred en bawn in a brier-patch, Brer Fox--bred en bawn in a brier-patch!'

Alabama: Steele, Palisades, Sandrock are all ideal for this....especially Palisades.

You can drop TRs on most all of the trad routes at Sandrock given some hiking and scrambling. That said, I don't think I have ever seen a bolted line at Sandrock that wouldn't go on gear.... You could engage in some mixed climbing on easier bolted routes.....any of the 5.8s and 9s would be fine for this.

Georgia: Currahee, Yonah, Lost Wall.
NC: Pilot, the Chimneys.
TN: Leda.


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By Siberia
From Birmingham, AL
Feb 12, 2013

Palisades and Sandrock are good choices.

At sandrock, Knob Wall was my first lead. Also, find some sport climbs there that have been retro bolted and place gear on them.

Palisades has tons of 5.6 routes good for first leads


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By Raul P
Feb 12, 2013
Stella!

So I recently have gotten into the trad climbing scene as well,

For Top Roping to place gear, hard to beat Palisades. Top Access with abundant strong trees to sling and anchor, with some pretty good lines.

Sand rock has some pretty awesome easy leads, (rare to include awesome and sand rock in the same sentence, but if you can deal with some hooligans, it's pretty rad) especially around the pinacle. Pin chimney being one of my favorite 5.8s, and loosey goosey is pretty fun/easy also. But to set the top rope for these, you would have to lead up (the standard route barely goes at 5.6.

Steele would be harder to set a top rope, everything I know of is bottom access, so you'd have to lead it first.


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By Brian Hudson
From Greenville, SC
Feb 13, 2013
Valor Over Discretion (5.8), RRG

Hey Jon, give me a heads up if you want to meet in the middle at Currahee or Yonah sometime.


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By Jon Powell
From LAWRENCEVILLE GEORGIA
Feb 13, 2013
stone depot

Brian Hudson wrote:
Hey Jon, give me a heads up if you want to meet in the middle at Currahee or Yonah sometime.

Anytime man. Like I said in my earlier post I'm no beginner. Strong sport leader on most 5.9 and a few 5.10. I am pretty flexible this time of year because of the type of work I do so let me know if your free and we will make it happen


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By Brian Hudson
From Greenville, SC
Feb 13, 2013
Valor Over Discretion (5.8), RRG

I got ya. Maybe we can hit up that sweet crag Todd suggested!


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By Brannen
From Flowery Branch, GA
Feb 13, 2013

Go to lost wall. There is nobody there and you can get to the top of most routes via some scrambling. Not a ton of 5.7s but plenty of 5.8s and .9s that can be toproped.

And after you get scared you can throw on your beanie and go bouldering up the hill at rocktown.


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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Feb 13, 2013
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after a day of cragging.

This should go without saying, but I'll say it anyway. Please don't take offense, as I don't know your proficiency with gear and/or non-bolted top rope anchors.

If you're practicing placing gear because you're not proficient at it, make sure that you can build a solid top rope anchor from gear. It's best to utilize a minimum of three bomber pieces.

If you're not using gear, you may have to get a little creative. If you have some static rope and/or lengths of webbing, bring it. If you have to tie an anchor off a tree, make sure you extend the anchor over the edge of the cliff so that your climbing rope runs freely and not over any edges. If your extended anchor runs over any sharp or particularly rough spots of rock, pad it. A folded up tshirt works, so does a pack, jacket, etc. If you need to secure whatever is padding the rock, take a small piece of cord and prussik the item to the rope, cord, or webbing that the anchor is comprised of.

Again, I don't mean to insult you. I just remember doing what you're doing and having to figure all that shit out on my own. You may be the type that does good research and knows all of this already. If so, I apologize. If not, this info may be of some use to you. Have fun.


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Feb 13, 2013
El Chorro

Jon Powell wrote:
And just for the record I am not a beginner climber. I am just new to trad and trying to learn things the safe way rather than getting myself or someone else hurt. Lots of guys like Todd W that like to give people a hard time on mountain project rather than help out a fellow climber. Some people forget that they didn't know everything at one point in their life. For the rest of you thanks.


Not that I condone being a douche bag, but you must realize that there are ALSO a lot of people on Mountain Project that would say that you ARE a beginner climber. It seems to me that if you can't place gear well enough to lead, then you can't place gear well enough to set up a top rope.

At the very least you could have given us a bit more information about your current skill set, where you'd like to climb, and how you plan to climb given that you don't know how to place gear well enough to trust your life to it. If you had done that, I don't think todd w would have joked you with the road cut picture.


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By todd w
Feb 13, 2013

I recommmend John Long's "Climbing Anchors", it has a huge section devoted to good & bad placements. It gave me a lot of confidence and insight.


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By TomCaldwell
From Clemson, S.C.
Feb 13, 2013
Me on One Pitch Wonder at Whitesides.  Photo credits to Kyle Jones and his lucky anti-rain jacket.

Jon Powell wrote:
Like I said in my earlier post I'm no beginner. Strong sport leader on most 5.9 and a few 5.10.


Trad has a way of humbling those that get in over their heads. Just a few years ago someone died in Tallulah on a 5.8 when they were capable of 5.12 sport. By trad standards, you are a beginner. It takes many years of frequent practice to become ~75% proficient at trad. This isn't an insult on your skill level, but a suggestion that you use caution and get a mentor. Practicing gear placements will have limited gains without someone experienced to evaluate the placement. Not all placements are as simple as shoving a cam into a crack, especially not on granite and quartzite, which is common in the SE. There are many books out there that you should check out while starting. One of my favorites was trad climbing: surviving the learning years, and later check out self rescue. Both happened to be available at the library.


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By Peter Pitocchi
Feb 13, 2013
Pete belays 2nd pitch Little corner

Holloway Mt near Blowing Rock you can set top ropes easily, but there are only a few routes. Another good idea for you would be to hang out at a place like T-wall and ask other climbers to set your toprope when they finish a route. You will have no problem getting others to agree to do this. Obviously you would want be quick and open up the route for others when you're done.


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By JCM
From Henderson, NV
Feb 13, 2013

todd w wrote:
This place looks good:


Problem is, that beautiful road cut is in Maryland. Thats barely even the South anymore.


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By Thomas Skinner
From Birmingham, AL
Feb 13, 2013
Talluhlah gorge

Mount Yonah is a fantastic place to learn gear placements. multiple 5.6 slab climbing on the main face. Also, there is a sport route on the lowers that protects well with trad gear and is suited for beginner 5.6 I think. Although please find someone with experience to grade your placements. This is a must!


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By Davis13au
Feb 13, 2013
Only a few moves with an awkward top out.

Lots of interesting comments here. I'll second one bit of advice first. Trad is not something to take lightly. You shouldn't assume you can just drop down a few grades and be safe. It has more to do with your ability to manage the climb (pro, anchors, leading, belaying, rappelling...) than it does ability to climb at a grade (and your safety has a lot to do with your belayer if you are leading).

I'll pass on something else I learned (as I learned to lead trad). Teaching yourself (or practicing) to place pro incorrectly is worse than not knowing how to place pro at all. Lots of folks have taken big falls or unzipped a line of pro because they didn't seat a nut or cam correctly or use the right length runner.

Anyway...I'll get off my high horse and say that if you are new to trad the best thing you could possibly do is find a mentor or take a class. You owe that to whomever is following you. Seneca is still the south east so I'll put a pitch in for it as a great place to learn trad. There are classic 5.4 to 5.9 multi pitch routes (and harder) and there are two great schools there that do a good job training new leaders.

Good luck...and last warning. Trad is expensive and if you get hooked sport climbs will become something you do when you can't climb trad.


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