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Does webbing deteriorate?
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By BSheriden
May 21, 2013

Seems like most posts by caprinae are flat out wrong and dangerous. Hopefully she can learn from this and refrain from giving unsafe advice in the future. But I am guessing we will continue to be subjected to her ten paragraph replies when one would suffice....


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By Caprinae monkey
May 21, 2013

Please see above - not advice, only a suggestion. And in light of all the remarks, I'll go ahead and jump on the "Corey should buy new slings" bandwagon, there are memorial day sales across the board anyway.

I don't see how my so called bad advice in checking the integrity of the sling in addition, is worse than speculation on its storage methods. I don't think any in-use sling should be used after 15 years, I'm just saying after the "stored properly" speculative test and the visual test maybe check it out physically too.

How is speculating that it is stored properly, PLUS a visual inspection (which would be done first), plus a body weight test (and visual inspection), worse than mere speculation? I think it just appears what I wrote comes across more as a fail safe test, which it is not, and storage guidelines is just internet speculation.

yeah sorry i am long winded.

Regardless, my new suggestion is for Corey to repurpose his slings for other things, such as tying seat cushions to chairs, and tying sleeping bags in a roll, maybe make reusable shopping bag handles.


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By Dan Bachen
May 21, 2013

Mike Rowley wrote:
Yes. Webbing deteriorates. Several weekends ago, a friend of mine who frequents The Creek was climbing some tower in the Bridger Jacks and when her 170lb male climbing partner weighted the rope to rap down, the webbing anchor snapped. He fell about 20 ft onto a ledge. I believe that he broke several ribs, and was a bit beat up but otherwise alright. Moral of this short story is: Dont trust old webbing. Its super cheap and easy to bring a little extra with you in case you need to replace some tat.


Seems like people are talking about 2 different situations. Its well established that webbing left on anchors over a few months to a few years will deteriorate to the point of not being able to hold body weight due to UV, rodents, etc. Unless you store your gear on your front porch these situations are not relevant to assessing stored slings on cams.


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By ChaseLeoncini
From San Diego, California
May 21, 2013
El Cajon Mtn. Leonids. 5.9.

"If the webbing is gonna break at 22 kN, its gonna break at 1 kN."

"Usually when there is deterioration due to UV, chemicals, bugs or decay it's not gonna hold 1 kN, not even close. If none of those are present, it's likely close to full mfg strength."

Im gonna add these to the dumbest things climbers have said thread.

If you're tires are bald but can still drive, the tires are probably brand new. Drive on.


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By Caprinae monkey
May 21, 2013

ok I'm SORRY!!!!!!!!!!!

ps, bald tires would not pass the visual test

apparently visual test alone is better than visual + weight it a bit test... they tell you to visually check your harness, and visually check your rope & feel for odd spots... I don't see why adding something would be worse. No, it's not as good as a FF 2 or weight it till it breaks test w/ 5,000lbs but that's as good as you can do w/o a lab.


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By ChaseLeoncini
From San Diego, California
May 21, 2013
El Cajon Mtn. Leonids. 5.9.

Relax Monkey im just giving you a hard time.

Nobody really minds if you don't know something on a thread and ask. You'll get a few guys who'll poke fun but thats normal even in a crowded room. It isnt until you get on stage and tell people a "fact" that is actually dangerous nonsense that people tend to get a little pissed off.

Again, to finish off the thread:

The majority of climbers will tell you:
Slings are cheap, hospital bills arent.

saw your edit monkey:

The thing is a body weight test tells you nothing. The force from a fall is far greater. You know that. Knowing that, why would you spray the above quotes to someone asking for honest advice and pass it off to a community of climbers (many of which have an amazing wealth of knowledge) and act like its fact?


Buy new slings, take care of them. Any sign of wear or if it has passed shelf life, toss them. A garage gets dusty, warm, damp, filled with fumes from cars, spray cans, cleaners, etc. And over a long period of time who knows what else.

Replace questionable slings.
Simple.


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By teece303
From Highlands Ranch, CO
May 21, 2013
Aiding.

Chase:

You are being too black and white about it.

Body weight certainly does tell you something: it tells you it can hold body weight! Body weight plus a bounce is pretty close to what a ratty sling will experience when you rap off of it. So a body weight test is damn useful there. Alas, sadly, it's often quite hard to safely conduct a bodyweight bounce test of rap slings.

And the simple fact of the matter is that slings are way stronger than we give them credit for. Even ratty tat that has been in the sun for months often holds falls (again, see the BD guy who did pull tests on old stuff).

It's just that there is no way to know for certain, so we replace old stuff.

What I'm more interested in is old slings that have been well cared for. I recently threw out a bunch of old slings that were 15 years old, but very lightly used and stored well. My hunch is that they were more than fine for lead climbing use, and this is where I would really like to see more hard data.


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By divnamite
From New York, NY
May 21, 2013

There is no incentive to do testing on 10 year slings. It's cheaper to buy new slings than conduct testing on decade old slings. Personally, even if someone's well cared for decade old slings do pass the test, I would still replace mine after three to five years.

"When there is doubt, there is no doubt."

PS: Spank the monkey!


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By ChaseLeoncini
From San Diego, California
May 21, 2013
El Cajon Mtn. Leonids. 5.9.

@Timothy
I agree with you. Weighting it and bouncing around will prove you can rap from it. And if i were ever to descend from a route in an emergency i would probably have to trust some ratty old slings.
However, i might also add, while everything you said is true, if i owned a pair of slings (and not stumbled upon them) that matched the OP's description I would discard them. As you did yourself.


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By Caprinae monkey
May 21, 2013

PS: Spank the monkey!

:(


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By teece303
From Highlands Ranch, CO
May 21, 2013
Aiding.

Caprinae monkey wrote:
PS: Spank the monkey! :(


Don't be sad, I understood what you were trying to say.


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By Caprinae monkey
May 21, 2013

Ah, thanks Tim :)


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