Home - Destinations - iPhone/Android - Partners - Forum - Photos - Deals - What's New
Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Does no snow = no spring at the base of RNWF on Half Dome come Summer?
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
By Nick_Cov
From Truckee, CA
Jan 28, 2014
Powder Day

I'm wondering how this terrible snow year will affect the spring this Summer. I'm planning on heading up there July or August, does anyone have any experience climbing RNW on a bad snow year? (Or 3 bad snow years in a row for that matter)

Second question: I've climbed a few big long free routes (Sun Ribbon Arete, Red Dihedral, couple others)and they both went rather smooth. How does HDIAD compare to these 2 routes?

Thanks


FLAG
By csproul
From Rancho Cordova, CA
Jan 28, 2014
Summit of Wolf's Head with Pingora in the background

Don't have an answer about the potential of the spring to be running, but when we did it a couple years ago, we were worried about it too. We opted to carry all our water up to the base, which sucked (especially since it turned out that the spring was running). We also found out that there is a more reliable spring on sub dome.

I have done SRA and I thought RNWF was way harder than SRA. SRA is easier climbing, shorter, requires no french free/aid, and does not have the logistical complications of the RNWF. Not unattainably harder, but I thought it definitely a step up in planning and execution. We did not do it IAD, so the considerations for doing it in a push are certainly different.


FLAG
By Guy H.
From Fort Collins CO
Jan 28, 2014
Crux roof on Freeway...

Most of the RNWF climbs pretty quick as long as you move fast on 5.8-9 terrain. The parts that will slow you down are the chimney pitches and the aid pitches. If you are proficient at french freeing, jugging, easy aid, and chimneys, you should have no problem with RNWF. Don't wait until the Zig-Zag pitches to figure out your aid system.


FLAG
By Air Alexy
Jan 28, 2014

My partner and I did RNWF in a 30-hour push. You can read about it on our blog at these two links:

bailureblog.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-push.html

bailureblog.blogspot.com/2013/02/bailing-gumbies.html

We did it in October of 2012, and there was no spring flowing. We pretty severely underestimated our water needs (and perhaps our speed, a bit, too), and were dangerously dehydrated by the end. I think if we had brought 8 liters total on the face, we would have been fine. We had planned to do that, but we stupidly hiked the death slabs in the middle of the hottest time of day, and burned through 3 liters on the way up. We also started the route at 7:30 pm, after basically no sleep for 40 hours. What can I say? We were psyched to climb once we arrived in the Valley.

I have not done either of the routes you mentioned, but my partner has. I think he would say that RNWF was the hardest/longest he has done. We had little experience with aid. We tried to short fix, but I don't think that saved us any time. Freeing pitches up high when you are tired and dehydrated is not easy, even when they are significantly under your comfort grade. The hardest we freed was 10c, I believe. This slowed us down a bit. Dial your systems and go as light as possible, except for water.

Good luck!


FLAG
By Sirius
From Oakland, CA
Jan 28, 2014
Moving through the crux lock - now that's micro beta for you, that is.

IMO, neither SRA nor RD are comparable to the RNWFHD.

But I think you should go for it all the same. The very best advice that I can give you: go light.


FLAG
By Eric D
From Gnarnia
Jan 28, 2014
Born again on the last move of the Red Dihedral, high Sierras.

We hiked our water to the base of HD in a dry year. It sucked but was doable.

The regular route on HD does not compare to the Red Dihedral. It is 2.5 or 3 times as big of a day. We short-fixed the first quarter, simul-climbed the second quarter, and belayed the rest, which resulted in a 12 hour climb. Though don't worry about it, just go for it.


FLAG
By knowbuddy
Jan 28, 2014
uh huh

We did half dome late September last year. Hiked in the evening/afternoon before without water for the route hoping the spring was running but fully prepared to leave our gear at the base and go back down for water if need be. Luckily there was enough in the pool to get water, albeit a little sandy. It's cold that time of year and the days are short so we didn't drink as much water as we expected to. Just keep moving. We started at 7am, summited at 9pm and made back the base at 11pm. Have fun!


FLAG
By Nick_Cov
From Truckee, CA
Feb 4, 2014
Powder Day

Good info, thanks everybody. That's the plan, light. I think we should be okay on the Spring if we go relatively early in the Summer. We are fast on 5.9 and I can French free pretty efficiently, and I can move quick in my aiders, but I suppose my strength is my ability to suffer.. thats all I need for the big days!

Thanks again
cheers


FLAG
By Simon W
Feb 4, 2014
Foreplay at The Pinnacles

Does anyone have good recent beta on the snowfall in the valley?

Apparently two weeks ago there was none, last weekend got fairly snowy, and more is forecast.

I guess that's it for mid-winter climbing!


FLAG
By doak
From boulder, co
Feb 4, 2014
Drinking with Moses

When you get there, ask around about the spring. Or check again on mtnproject and supertopo. Someone will know.

If an IAD is a bit too big, rather than suffering through a push, bringing minimal bivy gear in a backpack and spending the evening on Big Sandy is absolutely lovely.

My partner at the time wasn't up for an IAD, so we brought down jackets, thermal pants, and mylar emergency bags... and were reasonably comfortable. The location is truly awesome.

Tagging a pack on the upper pitches is no big deal (we had a 7mil tagline), but hauling a sack on the bottom pitches (and lugging all of it up to the base) sucks. Keep it light.

Oh, and the slabs approach is definately the way to go. Have fun!!


FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.