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Cordelette - How do you carry yours?
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By zimick
Sep 20, 2012

Ok.... Just wanted to survey folks and see what methods/solutions everybody has come up with to carry a cordelette... somebody has to have the "trick" no muss, no fuss way!


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By Tony B
From Around Boulder, CO
Sep 20, 2012
Got Milk? How about forearm pump? Tony leads "Alan Nelson's Bulging Belly" (5.10, X) on the Lost and Found Flatiron. Belayer is Mark Ruocco. Photo by Bill Wright, 10/06.

Doubled, redoubled, then tied into an overhand figure 8. If it is too long, I add a twist to the 8.
It is about the size of a plastic soda bottle that way and takes ~10 seconds to do and less to undo.


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By Said
From Boulder, Co
Sep 20, 2012
Top of the 3rd pitch of Touchstone at Zion NP.

Cargo Pockets in your pants. Great for route topos, cliff bars and P&S cameras too.

I recently did Steck-Salathe, the offwidth monster with all that crap in my pockets and did not find it a hinderance.


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By Ed Wright
Sep 20, 2012
Magic Ed

I have been climbing for 45 years and have never carried a cordelette.


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By Crossing
From Breinigsville, PA
Sep 20, 2012
old rag summit

When I carry mine, I coil it around my hand then wrap the remaining loop around the coil a few times and thread it through an individual strand of the coil and clip it. This pic might show it better.

A dingus with 2 cordelettes
A dingus with 2 cordelettes


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By Kenan
Sep 20, 2012
Shelf Rd

Tony B wrote:
Doubled, redoubled, then tied into an overhand figure 8. If it is too long, I add a twist to the 8. It is about the size of a plastic soda bottle that way and takes ~10 seconds to do and less to undo.


+1

Compact, easy to tie and untie


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By csproul
From Rancho Cordova, CA
Sep 20, 2012
Summit of Wolf's Head with Pingora in the background

Basically I coil it just like you'd butterfly coil a rope...except much smaller obviously.


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By Jim Titt
From Germany
Sep 20, 2012

Victoria Alexanders wrote:
I don't bring cordilette anymore. Instead I bring two tripple length slings.

Cut up to form two triple-length slings which I leave at home.


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By Derek W
Sep 20, 2012
First summit of First Flatiron

Tony B wrote:
Doubled, redoubled, then tied into an overhand figure 8. If it is too long, I add a twist to the 8. It is about the size of a plastic soda bottle that way and takes ~10 seconds to do and less to undo.

+1


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By Charlie S
From Ogden, UT
Sep 20, 2012
Cams above the arm bar moves on Three Pigs in a Slot, Indian Creek.

Take it from a double to a triple loop, hold both ends, twist several times, bend at the halfway point and it'll twist about its own axis. Rack on a biner.


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By Larry S
Sep 20, 2012
The wife and I road-trippin on the Connie.

I do what crossing described... start at the ends/knot wrap it loosely around my hand (flat with fingers spread) to make a ball the size of a small nerf football, when there's about 2' left to go, i do a couple wraps perpendicular to the first wraps, then tuck the tail through a few strands from each side of the first wraps and hang it from the tail loop. It's quick easy and secure, you don't have to fight to get a bunch of strands on one biner. When you need it, pop the tail free and drop the rest and it uncoils itself.


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By B.S. Luther
From Walnut, CA
Sep 20, 2012

Crossing wrote:
When I carry mine, I coil it around my hand then wrap the remaining loop around the coil a few times and thread it through an individual strand of the coil and clip it.


Someone showed me something similar recently. Take about 8 inches of cordelette then start folding it up on top of that section.. so you end up with a thick, 8 inch section (that's what she said), then wrap a bit of the remainder around it a few times and pull through one of the end loops and clip. Not sure if that made sense, I think it's the exact same idea as Crossing's just with a larger section. Works pretty well though, and very quick.


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By skeeter
From Lakewood CA
Sep 20, 2012

Victoria Alexanders wrote:
I don't bring cordilette anymore. Instead I bring two tripple length slings.


curious if you use this to double up at anchor or for top and bottom anchor

edit: currently i triple, twist, then rack


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By Lakota
Sep 20, 2012
Rex

Like so
Like so

Thanx. I like this new way of using tripple lengths..
Just something im trying out. The tripple lengths are manufacturer sewn btw so the strength is not impeded. Note my 'pas' prusell prussic with the dynamic cord I learned from a guide in Utah!


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By Matt Shove
From Ragged Mountain
Sep 20, 2012

raggedmountainguides.wordpress.com/2010/11/24/crafting-the-c>>>


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By zimick
Sep 20, 2012

Thanks for the input.... When i carry i have been doing the "ball and hang" method just was wondering if I was missing something!


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By Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Sep 21, 2012
Cleo's Needle

Victoria Alexanders wrote:


Welcome back Elenor.

dmmclimbing.com/knowledge/knotting-dyneema-vid/


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By harpo-the-climber
Sep 21, 2012

Ray Pinpillage wrote:


Sorry for thread drift. I saw that video and am aware you aren't supposed to construct sling by knotting dyneema or spectra tape.

However, I presume that there is no problem with using longer sewn dyneema/spectra slings as cordeletes by attaching them to two or three anchors and creating a master point by tying a figure 8 (or 9)? I have been doing this for a while with no problems.


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By Dom
Administrator
From New Brunswick Canada
Sep 21, 2012
Moby dick 5.11-

Ray Pinpillage wrote:




What's the link between the picture and the video?

Edit: The Quote seems to be malfunctioning. The last question is from me (Dom) and not from Ray Pinpillage.


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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Sep 21, 2012
Bocan

I've only done what I always thought was the standard way as seen in luebben's book. I wasn't aware people did it any other way.

The only difference is my coils are sloppier in the field and clean when I put it away.


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By Tony B
From Around Boulder, CO
Sep 21, 2012
Got Milk? How about forearm pump? Tony leads "Alan Nelson's Bulging Belly" (5.10, X) on the Lost and Found Flatiron. Belayer is Mark Ruocco. Photo by Bill Wright, 10/06.

Ray Pinpillage wrote:
Welcome back Elenor.

YEah, Welcome back... and then...
nahnah nah na Nahh na na nahhh... hey hey hey goodbye!

"And you... You've managed to piss off every single one of them."
"That was the plan."
"Not a great plan. ... There is NO THRONE, no version of this where you come out on top."


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By Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Sep 21, 2012
Cleo's Needle

Dom wrote:
What's the link between the picture and the video? Edit: The Quote seems to be malfunctioning. The last question is from me (Dom) and not from Ray Pinpillage.


I don't know, I just put up the DMM link.


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By Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Sep 21, 2012
Cleo's Needle

harpo-the-climber wrote:
Sorry for thread drift. I saw that video and am aware you aren't supposed to construct sling by knotting dyneema or spectra tape. However, I presume that there is no problem with using longer sewn dyneema/spectra slings as cordeletes by attaching them to two or three anchors and creating a master point by tying a figure 8 (or 9)? I have been doing this for a while with no problems.


Dyneema should not be tied in a knot. It is probably OK for top rope anchors but it seems like a bad habit to get into.


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By bearbreeder
Sep 21, 2012

knots are fine as long as there is rope in the system ....

the DMM video is very misunderstood


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By Dom
Administrator
From New Brunswick Canada
Sep 21, 2012
Moby dick 5.11-

Grosso Modo The DMM video shows that you should never tie your dyneema slings together using a knot. I've never seen anyone do this. Usually, dyneema slings are sewn together and I haven't seen dyneema slings sold without these ''sewn attachements''.

Cordelette on the other hand, is frequently tied together with a knot. (e.g. double fisherman's)


In the picture, the sling has an overhand used to equalized both strands of the sling. It's not used to tie the sling together. You can clearly see the ''sewn part in the picture''.

Don't know if this makes sense, but in a nutshell the video is apples and the picture is oranges.


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By Sam Stephens
Sep 21, 2012
Top half of Melifluous

Dom wrote:
Grosso Modo The DMM video shows that you should never tie your dyneema slings together using a knot. I've never seen anyone do this. Usually, dyneema slings are sewn together and I haven't seen dyneema slings sold without these ''sewn attachements''. Cordelette on the other hand, is frequently tied together with a knot. (e.g. double fisherman's) In the picture, the sling has an overhand used to equalized both strands of the sling. It's not used to tie the sling together. You can clearly see the ''sewn part in the picture''. Don't know if this makes sense, but in a nutshell the video is apples and the picture is oranges.


Not quite there killer. The knot is in a load absorbing section of the anchor. A knot in the dyneema cuts it by whatever % applicable. If for some god awful reason that master point were loaded beyond the decreased strength of the material with the knot in it, there would be problems.

That's pretty basic stuff.

Knot in dyneema, bad.

Knot in dyneema at anchor, bad.

Fall on anchor with knot in dyneema where the knot is used to form a master point and prevent extension, bad.


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