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Mar 12, 2013
Stella!
So, I will have about a week off in August to plan a pretty solid climbing trip. I'm looking into a bunch of the crags out west (I'm currently in the south east). What are summer conditions for J-Tree? Indian Creek? Yosemite?

I'm pretty much interested in single pitch trad 5.10-11 or multi pitch 5.9 or less (the more pitches the better!).

Anyone have any advice?
Raul P
Joined Feb 12, 2013
16 points
Mar 12, 2013
While this has been dissected at great lengths in other threads, here's my $0.02.
Kinda hot in Yosemite Valley in August, but if you haven't been there yet don't necessarily let it stop you. Tuolumne will have more enjoyable weather, and lots of long moderate trad routes. Good luck finding camping, though.
Lovers Leap always good if you're coming to NorCal to climb. Lots of good routes up to 5 pitches. Then go north to Smith Rock.
TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points
Mar 12, 2013
TWK wrote:
Tuolumne will have more enjoyable weather, and lots of long moderate trad routes. Good luck finding camping, though.


Tuolumne in the summer is amazing. Time your arrival at the Tuolumne campground ranger hut for 5AM Monday - Thursday (hut opens at 8AM) and you are almost guaranteed to get a spot for up to two weeks. Plan on excellent meals at the Mobil station (Whoa Nellie Deli) in Lee Vining and Tioga Pass Resort.
Dave Swink
From Boulder, Co
Joined Jun 14, 2007
43 points
Mar 12, 2013
Stella!
Thank's for the input. I've climbed in some brutal humidity here in the Alabama summers, so anything less than that would be great haha. Raul P
Joined Feb 12, 2013
16 points
Mar 12, 2013
Stella!
Dave, how are the flat irons in the summer? Raul P
Joined Feb 12, 2013
16 points
Mar 12, 2013
Flatirons are great, and distinctive climbing. Boulder is cool (micro-breweries), and you would have to climb at Eldorado Springs, Boulder Canyon, and Lumpy Ridge if you visited for a week. Camping in Boulder is not impossible but requires more planning/research into National Forest lands camping.

The summers are warm but bearable for climbing. The Flatirons all face east so they are shaded in the afternoons. Oh, and the humidity is pretty low.
Dave Swink
From Boulder, Co
Joined Jun 14, 2007
43 points
Mar 12, 2013
top of mt. lady washington - rmnp
Are you dead set on cragging or open to some alpine climbing? Cause august is prime season for that. Think bugaboos, high sierra, elephant's perch, RMNP, etc.

Tuolumne would be prime. Lumpy ridge outside of Estes Park would be sweet, paired with an alpine route or two in the Park.

J-tree, Indian Creek and Yosemite Valley would all be really hot in August.
Andrew Mayer
Joined Nov 14, 2010
122 points
Mar 12, 2013
Andrew Mayer wrote:
Lumpy ridge outside of Estes Park would be sweet, paired with an alpine route or two in the Park.


Heck yeah, alpine! Look at pictures of Petit Grepon, Sharkstooth, Spearhead, and Keyhole Ridge and you will be convinced. Nice and cool too. :-)
Dave Swink
From Boulder, Co
Joined Jun 14, 2007
43 points
Mar 12, 2013
OTL
I'm partial to TM

Tuolumne Meadows area and Tenaya Lake, from Olmste...
Tuolumne Meadows area and Tenaya Lake, from Olmstead Point, Yosemite NP


Its effing awesome and beautiful with or without the climbing.
Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Joined Oct 20, 2010
345 points
Mar 12, 2013
Agreed on TM. Wow, that picture is full of great climbing with Tenaya Peak on the right, Pywiack and Dozier domes centered, and Stately Pleasure dome on the left. Cathedral Peak is just out of frame in the right background. It would take you weeks to begin to do justice to the rock in that picture.

Is that Conness Peak in the center background? Back to fun alpine climbing there!
Dave Swink
From Boulder, Co
Joined Jun 14, 2007
43 points
Mar 12, 2013
Southeast Buttress of Cathedral Peak. Easy but World Class with unbeatable views. Easy approach through gorgeous territory. Would be a great intro to Tuolumne and the high Sierra.

Charlotte Dome, Bear Creek Spire, Fairview Dome.

A week's not long enough. You may never be happy in Alabama again. You may not ever go home.

I paid my debt to society--I spent 4 years of my life in Alabama. Auburn's not as bad as the rest of the state. I did zero climbing those 4 years, though.
TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points
Mar 12, 2013
Stella!
All I can say is Wow. I'm afraid I really wouldn't come back.... Since the time that picture got posted, I started looking for jobs out west. Hopefully the trip I take there this summer will be as I'm moving. Thanks for all the awesome feedback. Raul P
Joined Feb 12, 2013
16 points
Mar 12, 2013
squamish ...

the sbucks is a 5 min WALK away from the bluffs, and a 15 min walk away from the grand wall

:)
bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
2,053 points
Mar 12, 2013
Emerson summit
+1 for Tuolumne and the High Sierra

The weather is more stable than the Front Range and the camping situation is way friendlier. The Leap is not going to feel very challenging if you climb at that grade. There are some shady things that are reasonable to do that time of year in the Valley (e.g. Steck-Salathé).

I made this plot for myself in my ongoing internal debate about where to live/climb (yes, I realize it is super nerdy).

rain
rain


enjoy!
fossana
From Sin City & Bishop
Joined Apr 30, 2006
12,392 points
Mar 12, 2013
No, no, we were just kidding.

It's way too crowded, hot, rainy, and humid way out west. You really don't want to move from Alabama--you'll hate it here. You'll miss all the, um, something ...I'm sure there's something you'd miss.

Okra?
Rebel flags?
Fat chix raised in mobile homes?
Tornadoes?
Greasy sandstone chose heaps?
TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points
Mar 12, 2013
fossana wrote:
The Leap is not going to feel very challenging if you climb at that grade. There are some shady things that are reasonable to do that time of year in the Valley (e.g. Steck-Salathé)!


He said he leads multiple-pitch at 5.9. He'd love the Leap!
TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points
Mar 13, 2013
Stray dog found in rural Alabama w severe mange. T...
TWK wrote:
Okra? Rebel flags? Fat chix raised in mobile homes? Tornadoes? Greasy sandstone chose heaps?


Didn't get out of Auburn much, I take it?
BHMBen
From The Briar Patch
Joined Jan 12, 2007
1,530 points
Mar 13, 2013
BirminghamBen wrote:
Didn't get out of Auburn much, I take it?

Sure did. And I got the f**k out of your redneck $hithole of a sorry excuse for a state as soon as I could.

And if we want to turn this into an exchange about how fukt up Alabama is, start a new thread:

"How come nobody ever posts 'Suggestions for vacation in Alabama', why is it always "Coming to California--Climbing Suggestions?"?
TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points
Mar 13, 2013
me on top of Flowers of High Rank
Go to Tahquitz. I was there for two weeks last summer. The moderately long but incredible steep approaches keep the crowds at bay. The high number of quality multi-pitch is astounding. Good camping. Amazing town. For my entire time there, I only waited for one climb, the Open Book.
Open Book...worth the wait
Open Book...worth the wait
TommyWiggins
From Nanuet, NY
Joined Apr 5, 2010
75 points
Mar 13, 2013
John Marsella wrote:
well, that escalated quickly


Yeah, sorry. But spend any length of time in that culturally regressive region and you'll understand my angst.

And seriously, there are a lot of climbers who used to live in Alabama and there are a lot of people that live in Alabama who used to be climbers.

That's why this thread was about another Dixie refugee headed West.
TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points
Mar 13, 2013
Cold day at Smug's
TWK wrote:
Yeah, sorry. But spend any length of time in that culturally regressive region and you'll understand my angst. And seriously, there are a lot of climbers who used to live in Alabama and there are a lot of people that live in Alabama who used to be climbers. That's why this thread was about another Dixie refugee headed West.

By the same token...I've lived in CA for a good while and climbed there pretty extensively, but it'd be hard to convince me to move back. I love to come back for climbing vacations, but I'm not sure I'd live there again without some really big incentives. Course...I don't live in Alabama and I've never been there.
csproul
From Davis, CA
Joined Dec 3, 2009
214 points
Mar 13, 2013
The worst thing about California is that so many people like it. That's why they want to visit, or stay. TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points
Mar 13, 2013
Stray dog found in rural Alabama w severe mange. T...
John Marsella wrote:
well, that escalated quickly


He seems bitter.





BHMBen
From The Briar Patch
Joined Jan 12, 2007
1,530 points
Mar 13, 2013
north wash
Think about visiting boulder. Huge miltipitch 5.6's and 5.7's. the third flatiron is 8 pitches of moderate awesomeness. Climb at night for a beautiful scene of boulder lights. mr. mango
Joined Jan 18, 2012
72 points
Administrator
Mar 13, 2013
El Chorro
TWK wrote:
The worst thing about California is that so many people like it. That's why they want to visit, or stay.


Isn't that the problem with all of the world's coolest places? The only problem I can find in France so far is that there are a lot of French people. Can you imagine what California was like before WWII?

OP, a week is nothing. The time it takes to get around out west will surprise you. Pick a place with easy access, short walk ins and relatively low elevation. Lover's Leap would be great. A lot of friendly people there but not over crowded because of the limited camping (do some research so you can get a spot). Traveller's Buttress is awesome and I think it goes at 5.9. One hardish pitch but if I remember correctly you have a choice of 5.9 OW or 10a fingers which can easily be aided.

TM is amazing but it's huge. Save it for a two week trip or go with the idea that it is just a recon trip. My recommendation for dealing w/ camping is to just NOT deal with it. You and your partner should buy an "America the Beautiful Pass." It's $80 for one year and allows you to enter any NP as many times as you like. There are pullouts on the east side of TM where you can bivy.

Enjoy.
Ryan Williams
From London (sort of)
Joined May 10, 2009
1,468 points
Mar 14, 2013
Ryan Williams wrote:
Isn't that the problem with all of the world's coolest places? The only problem I can find in France so far is that there are a lot of French people. Can you imagine what California was like before WWII?


I've got a good friend who was in grade school in WWII. When his dad came back from the Pacific, they'd ramble, hunting and fishing, all over the Sierra and the Coast Range. Their 4WD tracks and hiking trails are now superhighways. Sometimes, he wishes he was dead--he can't stand stand to see it today.

My first trip into California's backcountry was 1980, and the use/abuse that I've seen since then is heartbreaking at best.

But it still beats most other places I can think of. There are just too damn many people.
TWK
Joined Sep 15, 2012
164 points


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