Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Climbing the highest peaks of all 50 states?
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 2.  1  2   Next>   Last>>
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
By Just Alice
From Burnsville, MN
Jan 18, 2010
I know it's not achieving the 7 summits or anything glamorous like that but it's become a new passion of mine. Anyone ever done this? Which state was the most difficult? I'll be climbing Rainier soon. Here's a cool link that I found to help me figure out which peaks to climb.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_...

FLAG
By jhump
Jan 18, 2010
Grand Canyon Rim to Rim to Rim 12/4/09, 42-ish mil...
Wow, that sounds like lots of driving. How about the second highest in each state? St. Elias, the Grand, etc.

FLAG
By Ralph Kolva
From Evergreen, CO
Jan 18, 2010
selfie
Check out listsofjohn.com/. Came across the link from Dougal McDonald's (sp?) Colorado Mountain Journal.

FLAG
By Stu Ritchie
From Denver
Jan 18, 2010
Desert Tortoise
Denali followed by Gannett in Wyoming.

FLAG
By Forestvonsinkafinger
From Iowa
Jan 18, 2010
If you come to Iowa, you will get a test of your map and compass skills, our highest point is actually in a corn field on the Sterler Farm. That'd be a cool photo on your wall next to rainier "and here I am at 1670ft above sea level" standing in a row of corn.

FLAG
By Jim Davidson
From Fort Collins, Colorado
Jan 18, 2010
Some people call this highpointing. Pretty sure there is a book out on this with specific locales, driving instructions, etc. The high points in flat states can be obscure. I hear that the high point in KS is a sunflower field - better bring full alpine gear. :)

FLAG
By Nathan Stokes
Jan 18, 2010
It is called high-pointing. One of my peak bagging friends does it as a side hobby. There are high point lists by state, county, etc. I think the one in one of the Atlantic states like Delaware is in someone's backyard. The high-pointers are nearly as picky as how you get to the high point as say ADK 46ers or NH 48ers.

FLAG
By Mike Dallin
Jan 18, 2010
Jim Davidson wrote:
I hear that the high point in KS is a sunflower field - better bring full alpine gear. :)


Actually, Mt Sunflower in Kansas is a pretty serious climb, especially the north face.

bettingers.org/air/ks000.htm

FLAG
 
By percious
From Bear Creek, CO
Jan 18, 2010
Hanging out with some scooter trash.
I've been working on this for some time now. I have 12 states I think.

A lot of people don't "get" why visiting each state is a fun thing to do. It's more about exploration and seeing parts of the country you would otherwise ignore. One of my favorite state high points is IA actually, the drive in and out is quite fun.

As for difficulty, the most difficult to find has been CT for me, the most demanding physically so far is probably NY. CO is not much more than a walk up with some altitude and weather considerations.

I am looking forward to WY, CA, and OR. AK will be one of the last, and HI will be a fun vacation...

Anyway, feel free to hit me up, I can give you more information if you like.

cheers.
-chris

FLAG
By Tristan Higbee
From Cambodia
Jan 18, 2010
Me on a mixed route Crisco and I did in Rock Canyo...
Here's the book: Highpoint Adventures.

The highest point in each state is something I'd love to do, too. I haven't gone out of my way to do them, though. So far I've only done California, Washington, and Utah. This summer I'd like to do the rest of the western states: Colorado, Oregon, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Arizona, New Mexico.

I like the idea of doing the second tallest in each state. Hmmm... intriguing...

FLAG
By Marc H
From Lafayette, CO
Jan 18, 2010
The Cathedral Spires in RMNP, left to right: Stile...
Some states are definitely no worth it, IMO. Take Florida as an example. The highest point was a landfill; it's now a rest area on some highway. :)

--Marc

FLAG
By Nathan Stokes
Jan 18, 2010
percious wrote:
I've been working on this for some time now. I have 12 states I think. A lot of people don't "get" why visiting each state is a fun thing to do. It's more about exploration and seeing parts of the country you would otherwise ignore. One of my favorite state high points is IA actually, the drive in and out is quite fun. As for difficulty, the most difficult to find has been CT for me, the most demanding physically so far is probably NY. CO is not much more than a walk up with some altitude and weather considerations. I am looking forward to WY, CA, and OR. AK will be one of the last, and HI will be a fun vacation... Anyway, feel free to hit me up, I can give you more information if you like. cheers. -chris


Why did you find NY so demanding? Its only 14 miles RT with ~3500 gain and you top out at just over a mile in elevation. There are much worse things in the Adirondacks than Marcy if you are ticking lists.

FLAG
By David A
From Boulder, CO
Jan 18, 2010
Hanging out after climbing a route in Eldo on a co...
I have 7 so far, going for ND in the next month or so!

FLAG
By Matt Pickren
Jan 18, 2010
Where did the rock go?
I've done 39 out of 50. I believe Wyoming (Gannet) and Alaska (Denali) are almost tied for the most challenging. AK is most likely the most expensive. We spent 5 days in the Winds and still did not summit for weather issues and not going via the cattle trail.

Don't be surprised when you find out how some can be very difficult for private property access issue. IE: Mount Frissel in Conn. you are only allowed certain days of the year. N.D. was sort of a pain, Charles Mound in Illinois is very much private land where you drive up the driveways. Just remember don't ruin if for everyone after you...

Yea, it can be a lot of driving, but I've sen a lot of thing all over the country I never would have seen otherwise. Especially the Deep South!!

Enjoy!

FLAG
By Rschap
From Grand Junction, CO
Jan 18, 2010
Well I never bash someone for setting goals and going for them. The only info I can help with is on Whitney in CA and Elbert in CO. I climbed Whitney a few years back and you should look into permits as soon as possible. I have the first edition of this book amazon.com/Mount-Whitney-Compl... if youíre looking for hiking info. But the best way to climb Whitney is the East face 5.7 13 pitches, check out this book if that interest you supertopo.com/packs/highsierra.... Elbert is just a hike for the most part. There are several trails to the top and no permits are required. I got turned back with the summit in sight (and the steepest part of the hike behind us) due to really bad weather that was impossible to see until we topped out on the ridge (very common in the Rockies). If you need a partner for Elbert hit me up, Iíd love to take another crack at it. Not knowing what your mountaineering experience is Iíll say make sure to give yourself extra days for the high points that are real mountains, Iíve been turned back because of local thunderstorms several times and even spent 4 days stuck in my tent at 13,000ft waiting for the weather to clear so I could climb North Palisade and other nearby mountains.

FLAG
By Francisco Di Poi
From Boulder, CO
Jan 19, 2010
If you come to CT and need/want a partner to get to the high points of CT, MA, VT, NH, RI im down. I tried a winter ascent of Mount Washington as my first ever mountain climb and got seriously shut down. Let me know if you come to the North east and are interested.

FLAG
 
By Leo Paik
Administrator
From Westminster, Colorado
Jan 19, 2010
Good luck. Denali #1. Someone wrote an article about doing this in 1 year in the last decade or so.

FLAG
By Wally
From Denver
Jan 20, 2010
A friend wrote a guidebook, not sure if it is in print.

amazon.com/Highpoint-Adventure...

Wally

FLAG
By Just Alice
From Burnsville, MN
Jan 31, 2010
I'm climbing Harney Peak, SD in exactly 7 days. It's a baby of a mountain, but the biggest mountain in this area to climb. Rainier isn't too far off for me, then Denali?

FLAG
By Andrew Gram
Administrator
From Salt Lake City, UT
Feb 1, 2010
Andrew Gram
If you are up for it, you can make Harney a pretty good mountaineering challenge. Start from the Palmer Creek Road that goes between Rushmore and Sylvan Lake. You'll see the obvious frozen waterfall from the road. Bushwhack up to it, climb a good pitch of WI3, and then wander up snow, ice, and 5th class rock for a long way to the top. It is a full value day that way, though a vehicle shuttle is a good idea so you can take the trail back to Sylvan Lake.

FLAG
By Just Alice
From Burnsville, MN
Feb 1, 2010
So you're saying to go a route that would require ice tools and also crampons? Just so I know if I should take the ice climbing tools or not...let me know your thoughts.

FLAG
By Andrew Gram
Administrator
From Salt Lake City, UT
Feb 1, 2010
Andrew Gram
If it is in, the ice route on Harney from the Palmer Creek side is my favorite pitch of ice in South Dakota. In a normal year it is in now, but I don't know what kind of winter SD is having. You can't toprope it - you need to be able to lead a fairly long and sustained WI3 pitch. You can see the ice from the road when it is in - the hike in is a couple of miles.

It is a route finding adventure getting from the top of the ice to the top of Harney. I really enjoyed it, but don't underestimate it. Ice axe, crampons, ice screws, and a small rack of rock gear are necessary.

Here is an old grainy photo of me leading the ice pitch.


FLAG
By Just Alice
From Burnsville, MN
Feb 1, 2010
Problem is I'm going alone, and that's probably not safe to do alone. Maybe next time...It looks like an awesome route. I'm anxious to try it with a friend sometime.

FLAG
By J.J
Feb 1, 2010
It's only dangerous if you fall...

FLAG
 
By Brian Milhaupt
From Golden, CO
Feb 1, 2010
Pyramid
Here's a cool list. Also has good beta for the routes.

peakbagger.com/list.aspx?lid=1...

FLAG
By Just Alice
From Burnsville, MN
Feb 2, 2010
Looks like the trails to Harney Peak are closed. I guess I'm going to have to forgo my trip. :o(

FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 2.  1  2   Next>   Last>>