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By Phum1986
From conway, Ar
Dec 17, 2012

So I have plenty of fat ropes (10.5mm). Looking to get something with a smaller diameter. I would like something 9.8mm or less. The fat ropes are great but don't feed all that well through the gri gri (short roping my climber on clips) plus they are heavy. That being said, what's a solid rope 9.8mm or less, good price, brand, and what kind of UIAA rating should I be looking for? I'm sure the $250 ropes out there are find but looking for something closer to my budget. Any suggestions? My area doesn't have any multi pitch climbs so should I go for 60M or just go for the 70M in the rare occasion I would need it? Thanks MP


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Dec 17, 2012
...

www.justropes.com/



Also:


SuperTopo has a "Price Finder" section that you might find helpful.(Located on the right side of the page)

www.supertopo.com/climbing/forum.php


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By Superclimber
Dec 17, 2012

www.ebay.com/itm/Edelweiss-Rocklight-9-8-mm-X-70-M-Dynamic-C>>>
Edelweiss Rocklight 9.8 on sale on Ebay. I used one of these for a couple years.


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By Superclimber
Dec 17, 2012

Oh and just to be a smart ass, you could try belaying with an ATC;)


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Dec 17, 2012
...

Shit Chris...

that's a GOOD find...


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By bearbreeder
Dec 17, 2012

something to think about ...

dont get fixated on the "diameter" ... i can name plenty of 9.8/9.9 mm ropes that are stiffer than some 10/10.2 mm ropes ... it all depends on how the rope is built to handle ... and the handling can change over the life of the rope, some get stiffer with age, others dont ...

the other thing is that some manufacturers ropes seem to be "wider" than their rating suggests ... generally mammut ropes are one notch up ... for example my mammut infinity is as thick if not thicker than a beal 9.7mm ... and as thick as an elderid python 10mm when i owned one ... yet it was more durable and stiffer despite its 9.5mm rating

go into a store and play with as many ropes as you can, generally the better it handles (less stiff), the better itll feed through a gri gri ... and try using as many different ropes of your partners as you can just so you can get a feel of the differences (and to save your ropes for the gnarl=P)

if yr sport climbing id get a 70m if you can get a good price simply becaue chopping the ends is not uncommon after enought falls ...


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By Larry S
Dec 17, 2012
The wife and I road-trippin on the Connie.

Discussion on the Mammut Infinity here - that's my suggestion - mountainproject.com/v/mammut-infinity-95mm/107730787

If you never use all of a 60, i'd save your $ and the weight and stick w/ the 60. I like my 70's for linking pitches and long rappels. In addition, i can (and have) chopped the ends of the rope as they get worn out and still have a good length of rope left.


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By Phum1986
From conway, Ar
Dec 17, 2012

Thanks for the feedback.

@chris: I definitely have thought about the ATC switch. I have plenty. But hen I find myself with a $100 paperweight(gri gri). Ha. I appreciate the words of wisdom.


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By JJNS
Dec 17, 2012

Edelweiss energy 9.5


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By superkick
From West Hartford, CT
Dec 17, 2012
Free Solo up hitchcock gully WI3

Blue Water Double Dry Lightning Pro 9.7 60 or 70m


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By John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
Dec 17, 2012

Edelrid Boa, 9.8mm 60m standard entry rope, retails at $150 year round. Handles well enough and you can even buy it at REI. If you wanna go fancy, the bi-color version is $190.


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By Rob Warden, Space Lizard
From Springdale Ut
Dec 17, 2012
blah

I can attest to the Boa being an awesome rope. I won one in a raffle and though it was going to blow. not the case at all


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By bearbreeder
Dec 17, 2012

John Wilder wrote:
Edelrid Boa, 9.8mm 60m standard entry rope, retails at $150 year round. Handles well enough and you can even buy it at REI. If you wanna go fancy, the bi-color version is $190.


i owned the python which is the boas bigger brother ... it lasted a week before i took it back to MEC ... no TRing or anything crazy ... the sheath was coming apart badly ...

as a reference ive done much worse things on my current ropes from TR gangbangs to big sport whippers ... etc ... and theyve lasted much longer and looked better even after months of daily use ... and im not the only one with this issue i know of with the Boa/Python series

i suspect it has something to do with the relative loose weave of the sheath ...

it does handle like a dream though ;)


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By Jason Halladay
Administrator
From Los Alamos, NM
Dec 17, 2012
Climbing at the Belvedere crag near Nago with a great view of the northern end of Lake Garda and the town of Torbole sul Garda below. June 2013.

John Wilder wrote:
Edelrid Boa, 9.8mm 60m standard entry rope, retails at $150 year round. Handles well enough and you can even buy it at REI. If you wanna go fancy, the bi-color version is $190.

Another strong nod for the Boa. We used one all year last year, roughly three times a week sport climbing, and that rope held strong and felt great the entire time. We often chuckled about it being classified as a "entry level" rope but being better than many of our supposed high-end ropes.
If you want to go smaller, I've been really happy with the Mammut Infinity 9.5.


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By Nick Pavlichek
From Athens, GA
Dec 17, 2012

You say $250 is too much, but what is your budget? $150?


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By Zappatista
Dec 17, 2012
Book me, officer.

For disclosure's sake, I've heard around town that Wilder is repping for Edelrid, adding a little underlining to why that particular brand is getting such rave reviews (ahem).

That said, I've owned three Edelrids, two Boa 9.8 70Ms and a Cobra. The Cobra was a shit rope, wore out much faster than expected for such a fat, heavy rope. Any Bluewater 10mil I've ever had kicked its ass ten times over, same with the Sterlings I've owned, a Kosmos for instance at 10.2 I'd put at outlasting the Cobra by a factor of 5, so the sale price becomes meaningless at some point. Not sure what the deal with the fatter Edelrids is but their skinnies seem to be much harder to kill, figure that one out for me.

The Boas are sweet, very happy with the hand, durability, and overall performance and value. I wouldn't dream of shelling out for the tricked-out dry version living where I do, the price was the reason I tried these models in the first place. I paid $129 shipped to my door for each, would say that I've been pleased as punch with every aspect. They handle like a slightly "hollow" Evolution Velocity, and I've used the first one to develop over fifty new pitches-kicked it down to a friend in need and switched to a sub-$100 PMI I got a screaming deal on, my homie's still rocking the Boa as of now, I got almost a year of hard use on it, usually would have gone through at least 2 or 3 of them in that time, but Boa #1 held up. Though I'm not getting paid to say so, these are pretty sweet cords.

One man's unpaid 2 cents.


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By John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
Dec 17, 2012

Full disclosure- I did work for Edelrid for a short time, but no longer do so. Not sure why that matters on a thread like this, but whatever.

The python and cobra both suck, the Boa doesn't, don't know why. Don't much care. For a full price rope, the Boa is hard to beat. I've been happy with the performance of mine. If you care that much about price, get the cheapest rope you can.


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By Che
From grnd junction, co
Dec 18, 2012

Two suggestions -

1.) Get a 70M rope especially if you are on a budget. The ends will wear out faster, so with a 70M you can chop the ends and get more time out of your rope. When you go to chopping the rope, it is always good to double check the rest of the rope for soft spots.

2.) Stick with a Gri Gri, it has saved the lives of a few people I know as a belayer can get knocked out by falling rocks, leader falls, etc.


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By Tomtomtomtom
Dec 22, 2012

John Wilder wrote:
Full disclosure- I did work for Edelrid for a short time, but no longer do so. Not sure why that matters on a thread like this, but whatever. The python and cobra both suck, the Boa doesn't, don't know why. Don't much care. For a full price rope, the Boa is hard to beat. I've been happy with the performance of mine. If you care that much about price, get the cheapest rope you can.

Hi, you got an opinion on the heron 9.8mm and the viper 9.6mm? I have a heron and my buddy has the viper, we use it mostly for single pitch sport, often multipitch sport/trad. We're european so lots of rainy/moist days, thats why i wanted a dry rope. My rope has stopped quite some small lead falls without any problem, but after one moderate fall on alpine granite, i have this spot where the mantle is pretty damn scuffed, more than i would expect from a rope thats been used for less than one season... I specifically chose this rope because its stated it can take 8 uiaa falls, more than most other models, thinking it would last. Bad purchase or overworried?


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By J.Roatch
From Twisp, WA
Dec 24, 2012
In my hammock camping in Washington in the Okinawa county region

Beal 10.2 feeds well, is flexible, and seems to be pretty darn durable. Doesn't feel as girthie as other 10.2's I've used


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By John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
Dec 24, 2012

Tomtomtomtom wrote:
Hi, you got an opinion on the heron 9.8mm and the viper 9.6mm? I have a heron and my buddy has the viper, we use it mostly for single pitch sport, often multipitch sport/trad. We're european so lots of rainy/moist days, thats why i wanted a dry rope. My rope has stopped quite some small lead falls without any problem, but after one moderate fall on alpine granite, i have this spot where the mantle is pretty damn scuffed, more than i would expect from a rope thats been used for less than one season... I specifically chose this rope because its stated it can take 8 uiaa falls, more than most other models, thinking it would last. Bad purchase or overworried?


havent climbed on the viper or heron. alpine climbing can be hard on ropes- but if the core is intact (no soft spot where the scuff is), its fine.

one note- never purchase a rope because it has a high number of UIAA falls- that literally means nothing when it comes to longevity of a rope. They really shouldnt even publish that number, as it is probably the most mis-leading point of data out there for ropes. The only time i've ever seen that test mean anything is a few years ago when Maxim found that one of their existing lines wasnt passing the test- the result of bad materials in their lines and ultimately caused a recall.


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By bearbreeder
Dec 24, 2012

People who are comparing two ropes of similar diameters can usually see this in the test results—Mammut publishes the % of each ropes weight that is sheath so that people can judge for themselves what rope they will be happiest with. If you fall a lot, choose a rope with a high fall rating; if you don’t fall that much then choose a ropes with a thicker sheath (and if the manufacturer doesn’t publish that info call them and ask for it!). If you climb both abrasive rock and you fall alot, then think about how you wore out your last rope—if it went flat 10 or 15 feet from the ends, then get the rope with the high fall rating for the size and if the rope just fuzzed up to the point it felt sketchy or fat or lost its dry treatment, then concentrate on a rope with a thick sheath and a compact weave.


www.highinfatuation.com/blog/straight-from-the-mammoths-mout>>>


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By John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
Dec 24, 2012

Wow, thats surprising to see coming from Mammut- i've talked to quite a few rope guys over the years (and obviously worked for one) and i've not talked to anyone who says that a high fall rating will directly translate to longevity. That's an interesting position.


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By bearbreeder
Dec 24, 2012

it makes sense if you think about it ... in theory a rope with a very high number of falls ... ie the beal flyer II (11 falls) will likely last longer in terms of big sports whippers than one with say 5-6 falls ...

on the other hand the one with the higher sheath % will likely last longer for trad or TRing where its lower angle with more abrasion

i used to think it didnt matter ... until i started climbing overhanging sport and taking a lot of whippers ... many of them 30+ footers, often 5-10+ times a day ... ive noticed that ropes with a higher fall rating do seem to last somewhat longer before getting funny spots

not that mammut has anything to gain by saying so either as many of their ropes dont has as high a fall rating as the competition

but who knows ... it could be all zombie elephant propaganda ;)


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By Loren Tragen
From Flagstaff, AZ
Dec 24, 2012
Nameless boulder on the edge of the Holy Boulders area in SoIll.

Most 9.8mm ropes can handle 4-6 falls, but I just read that the Metolius Monster 9.8mm can handle 9 falls (as opposed to the Boa's 5 falls)! I was looking for a new rope recently, and decided to get the Beal Edlinger II 10.2mm x 70m (which can take 8 falls) for $140 from alpenglowgear.com. All Beal ropes have dry-treatment, which makes them a little slicker through belay devices, and this rope's sheath and core are attached, which prevents slippage and makes it safer. I decided that bicolor ropes aren't worth the additional $50, because I can always mark the middle and 5m from each end with a nylon-safe marker. Dry-treatment shouldn't be a deciding factor if you're just rock climbing single-pitch crags. When comparing ropes on a budget, first decide on your mandatory width and length (for you, it seems 9.8mm x 70m), then just calculate price/#falls for each one. Beal seems to have some of the best prices based on number of falls.


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By michaeltarne
Dec 24, 2012

Gear Express has the 60m Edelweiss Energy 9.5 for cheap. Do that.


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