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Careers that could support this lifestyle?
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By 20 kN
From Hawaii
Apr 8, 2013

If you can handle military service, the US Navy selected reserves is a good option. In the reserves you can pick and choose your own job offers/ contracts and choose when you want to work. So if you need money you can volunteer to work more, and if you dont need money you just dont volunteer. However, you will have to do one-year-long deployment (likely in a combat zone) every 5 - 10 years so that is something to consider. The downside is that the reserves is best suited for someone who previously served on active duty and achieved a rank of at least E-4. Starting out in the reserves with no experience or rank would suck.

RN/ APRN, CRNA is a good option too. CRNAs get paid out the ass. Work as one for ten years and you can retire for life. However BE WARNED, what those who are recommending RN to you are not telling you is that getting a job as an RN at a hospital is much easier said than done. Due to the influx of recent RN grads over the past few years, RN has gone from being what was arguably the most open field to a relatively closed field. I know many RN grads who cannot find a job because hospitals wont hire them without previous experience. It is kind of like the viscous credit cycle where no one will give you a loan without you first having credit and once you get credit you get a loan, but at a very shitty interest rate.

Another option is you could be come a professional rigger. Get your level one SPRAT and IRATA certifications and go from there. Most climbers would love a rigging job because you get to play with climbing gear and rap down buildings for a living. The downside is that you dont get paid very well until you hit level III and the jobs are a bit far and few in between.


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By Christiney
From Wheat Ridge, CO
Apr 10, 2013
Horseman

I can tell you what NOT to do.... I found climbing a few months after I *finally* found a job at a BigLaw firm after the 2009 housing market bust... and it's killing me. 70+ hour weeks, 1-2 weeks vacation tops per year (if you make your hours), and I'm thinking about climbing all day.


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By John Herreshoff
From Ann Arbor, MI
Apr 10, 2013

Caprinae monkey wrote:
I can tell you what NOT to do.... I found climbing a few months after I *finally* found a job at a BigLaw firm after the 2009 housing market bust... and it's killing me. 70+ hour weeks, 1-2 weeks vacation tops per year (if you make your hours), and I'm thinking about climbing all day.


This is exactly why I'm ecstatic to go back to my job making $40,000 a year as a pilot when I graduate from law school in May. I might not make a ton of money where I'm at, but I can hold an easy 15-16 days off per month at my seniority. I'll take it happily over my colleagues who are either working 80 hours per work or worse, unable to find work at all.

Cheers!


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By 20 kN
From Hawaii
Apr 10, 2013

John Herreshoff wrote:
working 80 hours per work or worse, unable to find work at all. Cheers!

Working 0 hours per week is worse than working 80? Interesting.


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By EricSchmidt
Apr 10, 2013

NickinCO wrote:
nursing sucks because you work for corporate america. I'm sofuckinghappy I finally got back into the fire service and away from all the bull that comes along with a privately owned for profit hospital. Every shift there's a new rule or some new form of documentation that you (and your whole staff) were doing wrong... And even if you bust ass pick up a bunch of open shifts to help the department out (10 bed ER) and never call in sick, at the end of the year you get a 1.8% raise LOL! This is the biggest hospital company in the Denver area also BTW. $24/hour is change when you have 50-60k in student debt also...


waaaah. Werent you spraying to everyone about how awesome going into nursing was a few months ago? 10 bed ER??? Thats your problem... How is that the biggest hospital in denver?


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By Kirk B.
From Boise, ID
Apr 11, 2013
belay slaving on some route I forgot the name of way right of Bloody Fingers.

What's a "Lifestyle"?


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By Mark Mueller
From Flagstaff, AZ
Apr 11, 2013
Great quality rock on this one!

try unemployment


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By Zirkel
From Bishop, CA
Apr 11, 2013
Owens Gorge.  Mt Tom in background.

www.nih.org/jobs/show_job_category.php?category=Nursing&sub=

Pension
$30/month health insurance
3 @ 12 hr schedule
Brand new facility
Not for profit hospital

Did I forget to mention climbing and bouldering?


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By Liberty
Apr 11, 2013
Me

EricSchmidt wrote:
waaaah. Werent you spraying to everyone about how awesome going into nursing was a few months ago? 10 bed ER??? Thats your problem... How is that the biggest hospital in denver?

Denver health does rock! The best level 1 trauma center in the area. Indeed inner city population but so much to learn. I would recommend it to anybody energetic and hungry for knowledge. Not an easy work but great support from doctors being a teaching facility. The work is hard though you guys. I put in 2 years of nights there as a float.


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By Whippin
From Bend, OR
Apr 11, 2013

Davis Stevenson wrote:
How has nobody mentioned any 'work-from-home' type things? Take some classes on graphic design, or web development.


This. I now work remotely as a web developer which has allowed me to move to a place with good climbing. Make my own hours which lets me climb during the week, and have no problem taking off large chunks of time for trips. Last year I skyped in to a meeting with from the Yucca Valley Walmart parking lot, then went and climbed. Did the same thing this winter ice climbing in Ouray and billed some hours from the hotel on my rest days.

The catch: It's hard. Web development requires a lot of up-front time investment and constant learning to keep up with the latest in the industry, but the payout is worth it. You have to like it. As mentioned you don't need a degree (though it can help), just a willingness to grind through the hard initial learning curve. I worked in 9-5 cube land for about 4 years until I got enough experience to freelance. If you go in this direction, be prepared for 5+ years of constant learning and potentially low-paying gigs to get your skills up to snuff. There are also web development specific schools popping up around the country where you can pay a couple Gs for a weeks-long course to get you started. If I were starting now, that's what I would do, followed by building a portfolio of side projects I could show potential employers. The other catch: be prepared to deal with a lot of bullshit getting health insurance if you freelance.


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By D@n
From Boulder, CO
Apr 11, 2013
Head full of lead. Photo by Frosty Weller

I like the idea of being self employed. Online retail is what is I would consider reasonably viable if you had little in the way of start up funds and didn't want to go back to school. Sell climbing gear, clothes, DVDs, supplements, etc. Amazon or eBay are interesting places to look for retailers who are successful and who you may be able to emulate. There are a lot of blogs and articles on getting started. I've looked at a few and the guy you want to be is Timothy Ferris, the author of The Four Hour Workweek (probably a douche but he's got some good ideas).
Best of luck out there.


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By MJMobes
From The land of steady habits
Apr 11, 2013
modern man

grow 10-20 pounds of weed outside somewhere every summer when its too fucking hot to desire climbing rock. The first frost almost always means its time to chop the bitches down and climb, then you have the next 6 months off with a fat savings and very little work .

thats what I'd do if my marriage/family wasnt on the line

other than that being legally self employed is the best answer really, calling in sick is never a problem.


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By Will S
From Joshua Tree
Apr 11, 2013

Code monkey is your best bet. A culture that expects shorter term stints on resumes, typically telecommuting isn't a problem, pay is good to excellent, dress code is non existent, etc.

Downside: Isolation/no social component to your workday. Continuing education is a must because tech changes so rapidly. Some 11yo Korean kid can already do the same work, better and faster, for half the pay. Good chance of being obsolete well before it's time to retire. No real job security.

I have a buddy who is a union boilermaker (basically a welder with extra chops). Busts ass durng the work season, which is typically project driven, and then has usually 6-8mo off between projects. He makes VERY good money. He gets plenty of climbing in. Downside for him is limited locations he can live/work.

Most trades type work can be run as small shops, even solo ventures. Resume gaps aren't a big deal. Nobody on a job site gives a shit if you have a degree or where you got it, only how good your skills and work ethic are. My uncle worked in contruction trades all his career, almost always as his own employer with maybe one or two employees. He had a long list of GCs who would call him to sub, to the point he was always turning down work.


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