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Careers that could support this lifestyle?
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By jselwyn
From Grand Junction, CO
Apr 3, 2013

If the medical stuff has any interest to you its def worth looking at. There's a lot of jobs in the medical field that aren't nursing and work the same 36hr/wk schedule. My wife is a nurse and it didn't really appeal to me, so I went to respiratory therapy school. Same length of education, but more focused. Getting your 1-2yrs of experience as a new RT may require you working in a place that is less that ideal, but afterwards you can find lots of job options all over. Other jobs include radiology tech, ultrasound tech, EEG techs, even CNA.
CNAs work their asses off, but most places will pay for the class, its cheap, its a short class, always find a job, and the pay isn't great but its better than fast food/retail and still 3 days a week.


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By Patrick Vernon
From Albuquerque, NM
Apr 3, 2013
mexico

Liberty wrote:
Experience is what you need. Denver has never had a good market for nursing. I took a huge pay cut coming from East coast 10 years ago. I was already experienced though. All new grads wanna work ER or ICU...why not LTEK ? Hard work tons of sick patients, always need people, lots of skills to practice. Clalifornia needs nurses. New grads ahould not be so picky. Remember its not about glamour but about helping sick people.


I never wanted to work ER or ICU right out of school. I am open to SNF and LTAC. The problem is the market is saturated with nurses with 10, 20 years of experience willing to take pay cuts to live out here looking for work. Its a popular place to live!

I know nurses here with good experience having a hard time finding work. I went to University of Colorado, one of the most highly regarded schools in the state. People who graduated before me took up to eight months to find a job. It's not impossible, its just not the rosy job outlook everyone says it is. Networking is key.

Everyone loves NPR right?
kunc.org/post/job-market-catch-22-newly-graduated-registered>>>


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By brianjames
From Appleton, WI
Apr 3, 2013
Working on a boulder problem in yosemite, can't remember the name of the problem

Rob Davis wrote:
I have less free time now that I'm a teacher than I did while I was a student working another job. Yes you have time off in the summer, but it's hot in the summer, most people would rather take their vacation during the "good climbing months" (fall), you end up working 12 hours a day during the school year so unless you're going to crank plastic all of the time you get out of shape, you can't go out at night during the week. If you like teaching then go for it. If you're doing it just to get vacation time, find another profession.


+1 On this post. I am a teacher also and can attest to everything Rob is saying. Some previous poster mentioned getting done at 3:45 and climbing all the time. Those teachers are generally not very good and are just doing it for the time off and do not really care about the craft. I probably put in well over 65 hours a week on planning, grading, extra duties (coaching), and just looking for new innovative things to include into the classroom. Sometimes I think about how easy a lot of 9 to 5ers have it that when they leave work their day is done. Also depending on the field you want to teach in it may be really hard to find a teaching job. In my state for every social studies opening 200+ apply for it.


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By EricSchmidt
Apr 3, 2013

You should do what you want. Yeah Nursing is a good profession but if you are only in it for the money and good schedule you won't last, you have to love doing it. Why is everyone trying to steer him to nursing when it really sounds like teaching is what his heart is set on? I guess its just the obligatory "go into nursing" post?


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By David Sahalie
From on the road again
Apr 3, 2013


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By Eric G.
Apr 3, 2013

One last note: just like nursing, teaching might not be what you think it is. There are the highly sought-after positions in both careers that are easy to romanticize, and there are the harder,"get-your-hands-dity," more thankless jobs that you will most likely get until you've worked your way up.

My friend has been a teacher for a couple years and, after a highly competitive and lengthy applications process, she works with troubled kids who constantly call her rascist names, are violent, and say stuff such as "why don't you hop on my dick?" when she asks them to quiet down (that's from at 7 or 8 year old)! When you bring these kids to the principal's office, they send 'em back to class because the parents apparently don't care and the principal's office has to be reserved for truly heinous behavior/crimes. Same with nursing--I know a dude who wipes butts professionally, but on the othe hand, I know a really hot girl who instantly became a promotional advertisements model for the nursing outfit and her primary duties involve heart-warming work in the newborns ward.

Main point: it's all too easy to idealize or romanticize some lines of work. Know what you're getting into. Elenor sounds like she's elbow-deep in human waste, but apparently she's killing it. You gotta find a way to figure out what's right for you.


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By FrankPS
From Atascadero, CA
Apr 3, 2013

Here is the definitive answer on pursuing a nursing career:



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By drmartindell
From Homer, Ak
Apr 3, 2013

Lots of different possibilities. Come to Alaska and participate in the fishing season. Generally lasts March-September for the majority of the fisheries. You wouldn't have to spend that entire time here, maybe just fish in a few of the fisheries and then leave. I know many people (including myself at times) who do this work and then lead the gypsy life for the remainder of the year. Only downside is that you are far away from climbing during some of the best months of the year. But, if you play your cards right you could be done in time for Squamish and then continue on from there.


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By ZackBay
Apr 3, 2013
By Rap Rings

Go to college where the climbing is good. Study something that has the potential to make you lots of money later in life. When you have a job that pays you well you can take time off to go climb anywhere you want.


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By Rob Davis
From Brooklyn, NY
Apr 3, 2013

Eric G. wrote:
One last note: just like nursing, teaching might not be what you think it is. There are the highly sought-after positions in both careers that are easy to romanticize, and there are the harder,"get-your-hands-dity," more thankless jobs that you will most likely get until you've worked your way up. My friend has been a teacher for a couple years and, after a highly competitive and lengthy applications process, she works with troubled kids who constantly call her rascist names, are violent, and say stuff such as "why don't you hop on my dick?" when she asks them to quiet down (that's from at 7 or 8 year old)! When you bring these kids to the principal's office, they send 'em back to class because the parents apparently don't care and the principal's office has to be reserved for truly heinous behavior/crimes. Same with nursing--I know a dude who wipes butts professionally, but on the othe hand, I know a really hot girl who instantly became a promotional advertisements model for the nursing outfit and her primary duties involve heart-warming work in the newborns ward. Main point: it's all too easy to idealize or romanticize some lines of work. Know what you're getting into. Elenor sounds like she's elbow-deep in human waste, but apparently she's killing it. You gotta find a way to figure out what's right for you.


agree with this. For the five positions the opened at my school this year, there were almost 1000 applicants (yes, one thousand). You can do that "I mean, I can't figure out what I want to do so I guess I'll just be a teacher" thing and end up in a worst-case-scenario abusive school that takes advantage of teachers, and then get burnt out after a few years and go back to school, or you can find a career you actually are good at and not waste everyone's time.


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By Peteoria
Apr 3, 2013

#1 career choice if climbing is your top priority would of course be climbing... DUH! Alex Honnold makes six figures.

Although related professions work well for cross training - Richard Rossiter is a yoga instructor for example.

Overall, +1 for sugar momma / lotto and I'd maybe suggest seasonal work like doing taxes. That way if you get crippled you have a back up plan to become a 'respected' member of this mercantilist based, gold worshiping, fascist society climbers oh so tenaciously avoid integrating with. Unless you'r an ice climber wearing $700 boots


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By Dave Lynch
From Douglas, Wyoming
Apr 3, 2013
Sunny day on Lost Marsupial, The Throne.

Holden Caulfield wrote:
So you are a mooch? Being a mooch might be a good option for the OP.

Damn, was I the only one who thought your comment was old-person-falls-down funny?


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By John Herreshoff
From Ann Arbor, MI
Apr 3, 2013

Airline pilot.

You can commute to work from any airport with airline service (though I'm not saying it's always easy). I have a friend who sold his house, bought an Airstream, and rolled out to where ever he wanted to be for the time being. You can get anywhere from 3 to 10 days off in a row (depending on your seniority), but the pay ain't great. Expect to make $19,000 first year at a regional airline, and the really good jobs at major airlines are few and far between.

That being said, the time off can be fantastic once you've got some seniority.


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By Kyle M
Apr 3, 2013

Spatial Sciences.... jobs in GIS pay great, test you on a daily basis, and offer endless opportunities.

City of Bozeman is hiring 2 City Planners if anyone with experience is looking for a change in lifestyle...

www.bozeman.net/Departments-(1)/Human-Resources/Jobs#.UVzs7I>>>


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By wankel7
From Indiana
Apr 4, 2013

John Herreshoff wrote:
Airline pilot. You can commute to work from any airport with airline service (though I'm not saying it's always easy). I have a friend who sold his house, bought an Airstream, and rolled out to where ever he wanted to be for the time being. You can get anywhere from 3 to 10 days off in a row (depending on your seniority), but the pay ain't great. Expect to make $19,000 first year at a regional airline, and the really good jobs at major airlines are few and far between. That being said, the time off can be fantastic once you've got some seniority.


Of course you have to work hard to pay off the 60k+ in debt to get all of the ratings :)


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By Steven Groetken
From Durango, CO
Apr 4, 2013
On top of Hitchcock Pinnacle.

Probably not what you're looking for, but I sure did a lot of climbing in the Army. If you get in the right occupational specialty, you'll do a good amount on the job ( the Army has a contract agreement with Metolius for a reason). There's also a good amount of free time, one month vacation, and every conceivable government holiday, plus comp time if you ever have to work overnight in the barracks. I had way more days off than I do currently in the civilian world.

You could also get stationed in places that are close to good climbing. Ft Carson, CO ( Colorado Springs) FT Drum, NY ( home of the 10th Mountain Division near the Gunks) Ft Bliss, TX ( Hueco Tanks) Ft Huachuca, AZ (Cochise Stronghold) Ft Irwin, CA (J Tree, Tahquitz, Red Rock, Yosemite) and several posts in Germany and Italy.

Good pay, good benefits to help with your degree ( GI Bill and Tuition Assistance rules!) and you get paid to do PT every morning to get you into excellent climbing shape. Just a thought.


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By Rob Davis
From Brooklyn, NY
Apr 4, 2013

John Herreshoff wrote:
Airline pilot. You can commute to work from any airport with airline service (though I'm not saying it's always easy). I have a friend who sold his house, bought an Airstream, and rolled out to where ever he wanted to be for the time being. You can get anywhere from 3 to 10 days off in a row (depending on your seniority), but the pay ain't great. Expect to make $19,000 first year at a regional airline, and the really good jobs at major airlines are few and far between. That being said, the time off can be fantastic once you've got some seniority.


One of my best friends is an airline pilot. He's very very in debt, lives in those weird pilot hotel rooms most of the time, and has very little chance of being promoted or hired by a better airline. He loves his job, and takes full advantage of his time off, but the people that jump ahead in the pilot game put in their time in the airforce/air rotc/are rich and started flying at a young age.
He also flew every day from xmas eve through new years day without seeing family or friends.


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By Travis Senor
From Mailing Address in NC
Apr 4, 2013
Profile photo, exhaustion after a long day on Rainier.

Careers? Not so much of a long-term career suggestion, but I'll second the recommendations for seasonal work. A fishing or drilling gig will net you some bankable cash, and then when you're done with the contract the time's all yours.

Slightly more outside the box is taking up a seasonal gig with the U.S. Antarctic Program. If you get in good you can usually keep coming back on (southern) summer contracts (5-6 months usually). You bank all of your income, have the opportunity to travel a little bit, and when the contract's up it's only early Spring in the U.S. so you get the whole spring/summer to climb. Last I knew there was a bouldering cave down at McMurdo to keep fit.

Totally random, but might work.


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By Davis Stevenson
From Flagstaff, Arizona
Apr 4, 2013
Following up a new route out in the Mojave Desert.  Info coming soon maybe?  Fun 5.10 hands and fingers.

How has nobody mentioned any 'work-from-home' type things?

Take some classes on graphic design, or web development. Search around and find many one-off contracts in the range of $500 for putting a logo together for a company. There's thousands of dollars to be had in web design and security for small/medium companies. Start finding small projects for Social Media Marketing. It's such a new field, there's no formal training, and it's pretty easy and surprisingly consistent and formulaic work. What about Internet Sales and Marketing? Find clients and do pay per sale traffic towards their website. Most companies will want to keep plausible deniability, and don't care too much what you do. What about independent software design? Keep a powerful laptop with you to code on, then ssh if you need it back to your client.

Best of all, tmost of these can be done on a 1099, and are short term. Yeah, you'd spend extra time hunting these down, but no more time than hunting down jobs in new cities every couple of months.

Invest in a good laptop, a cell-phone, a 4G internet card for your laptop (or mobile satellite internet-- the kinds of things for RVs). You can work wherever, whenever.


If you play your cards right and are smart, you could probably make $20 /hr with no more education or experience. Think about iPhones and how many stupid apps there are for them. Most of them are simple and small projects. Learn to code for the iPhone and Droid and you'll be in good shape


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By Skat B
From Down Rodeo
Apr 4, 2013
St George

I have been thinking the same thing: What job would be most conducive to climbing? There are a lot of answers, but I have two ideas in mind that could work for me:

(1) I have a BS in Accounting so maybe I could just do taxes during tax season, save, climb for the other half of the year.

(2) Sit on a street corner and play guitar and hopefully by doing that 2-3 days, I could raise enough money to climb for a week.

Doesn't Nicky Dyal work as a financial consultant or something half the year and then takes the rest of the year off? JC Hunter really is the person I look up to: she has 4 kids, a full-time job (nursing?), she's married, yet she's able to find the time to climb .14b's. Just look her up on YouTube!


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By wankel7
From Indiana
Apr 5, 2013

Steven Groetken wrote:
Probably not what you're looking for, but I sure did a lot of climbing in the Army. If you get in the right occupational specialty, you'll do a good amount on the job ( the Army has a contract agreement with Metolius for a reason). There's also a good amount of free time, one month vacation, and every conceivable government holiday, plus comp time if you ever have to work overnight in the barracks. I had way more days off than I do currently in the civilian world. You could also get stationed in places that are close to good climbing. Ft Carson, CO ( Colorado Springs) FT Drum, NY ( home of the 10th Mountain Division near the Gunks) Ft Bliss, TX ( Hueco Tanks) Ft Huachuca, AZ (Cochise Stronghold) Ft Irwin, CA (J Tree, Tahquitz, Red Rock, Yosemite) and several posts in Germany and Italy. Good pay, good benefits to help with your degree ( GI Bill and Tuition Assistance rules!) and you get paid to do PT every morning to get you into excellent climbing shape. Just a thought.


Unless you get stationed in S. Korea ! :p


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By Gwut
Apr 5, 2013
Me

Become a top stone mason, good bucks + you can just drop your trowl and take off, if it means for just half a day at the crag or weeks or months at a time.


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By Rob Davis
From Brooklyn, NY
Apr 5, 2013

Gwut wrote:
Become a top stone mason, good bucks + you can just drop your trowl and take off, if it means for just half a day at the crag or weeks or months at a time.



Manual labor is probably one of the more realistic job/"career" that can be pursued while still climbing close to full time. There's always room for upward growth in the industry, and you are probably already pretty close to meeting the physical and mental requirements.


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By NickinCO
From colorado
Apr 5, 2013
after the hard stuff, into cruiser hands.

nursing sucks because you work for corporate america. I'm sofuckinghappy I finally got back into the fire service and away from all the bull that comes along with a privately owned for profit hospital. Every shift there's a new rule or some new form of documentation that you (and your whole staff) were doing wrong... And even if you bust ass pick up a bunch of open shifts to help the department out (10 bed ER) and never call in sick, at the end of the year you get a 1.8% raise LOL! This is the biggest hospital company in the Denver area also BTW.

$24/hour is change when you have 50-60k in student debt also...


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By Jon C. Sullivan
From Fort Collins, CO
Apr 8, 2013
approach to the Grand

Im stoked on all of the replies. I just returned from another week in Indian Creek and came home to some really helpful responses. I will say, this may be one of the only forum posts I've seen that is free of some sorry soul's critical jargon so thanks for that as well! I agree with the "pursuit of happiness" ideal. I have been doing seasonal work for a while but its hard to make enough money with my current seasonal jobs (climbing guide/Vitamin Cottage). Both pay pretty good ($+12.00 or +100.00 day day) but I am ready to find either a job to make big, fast cash i.e. manual labor, fisheries, oil etc. or just set myself up for a career. I know that I would like teaching, I have always known that but it is still very helpful to hear from people who know more of a teacher's lifestyle. Thanks again everyone. I hope for those of you in similar shoes that you also find a great answer!


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