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Can i use my WI crampons for mountaineering?
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Apr 22, 2013
So my only experience with crampons is fully rigid Rambos and Terminators on up to WI 5 and easy Mixed terrain.
Can I use these same crampons for regular mountaineering? Specifically Whitney, Mountaineers route.
Or do i need to get some light aluminum horizontal point 'pons?
daven
Joined Apr 6, 2013
0 points
Apr 22, 2013
My biggest safety concern would be balling. My experience with Rambo crampons was that they balled up like crazy making for dangerous walking.

For the record, I've used Cyborg monos for general mountaineering with good results. Aluminum crampons can get scary if you encounter any blue ice.
Dobson
From Butte, MT
Joined Oct 20, 2011
187 points
Apr 22, 2013
Me
Can a guy piss standing up or does he need to sit down? Gwut
Joined Mar 17, 2013
80 points
Apr 22, 2013
Maroon Bells-Bell Cord Couloir
Make leashes for them... Mountaineering in crampons meant for stiff-ice-can cause them to pop off. You wouldn't want to lose them mid-route. AnthonyM
Joined Mar 5, 2009
43 points
Apr 22, 2013
Epic free solo with a pack on
Gwut wrote:
Can a guy piss standing up or does he need to sit down?


I think you nicely wrapped up the answer he was seeking.
Ben Brotelho
From Albany, NY
Joined May 4, 2011
700 points
Apr 22, 2013
Aiding. Photo by Locker.
Mountaineering, Freedom of the Hills says that rigid crampons used for mountaineering/hiking are prone to stress fractures and breakage because they don't flex when you walk, but your boot does.

I do not know if this is true or the usual overcautiousness of that book. I gave up any pretense of wanting to freeze my ass off in snow and ice pursuits long ago.
teece303
From Highlands Ranch, CO
Joined Dec 16, 2012
636 points
Apr 22, 2013
Sunny day on Lost Marsupial, The Throne.
Don't get aluminum crampons. They're worthless and do not stand up to mountaineering. I've heard many people tell me they've broken or bent aluminum crampons their first time out. Your Rambos would be better than aluminum, but you would be better off with horizontal front points for snow travel. Dave Lynch
From Waseca, MN
Joined Nov 17, 2009
520 points
Apr 22, 2013
Me
Timothy.Klein wrote:
Mountaineering, Freedom of the Hills says that rigid crampons used for mountaineering/hiking are prone to stress fractures and breakage because they don't flex when you walk, but your boot does. I do not know if this is true or the usual overcautiousness of that book. I gave up any pretense of wanting to freeze my ass off in snow and ice pursuits long ago.


And whos mountaineering boots flex?
Gwut
Joined Mar 17, 2013
80 points
Apr 22, 2013
Maroon Bells-Bell Cord Couloir
Gwut wrote:
And whos mountaineering boots flex?


I have a rigid boot (for winter) that do NOT flex and I have a spring/fall (less insulated boot) that flexes quite a bit.

Depends on your boot and preference.
AnthonyM
Joined Mar 5, 2009
43 points
Apr 22, 2013
Takin flight on the 'sky swing'
A vertical point(s) will not hold in snow, alpine ice or snice well at all. You'll find this out on our first excursion with them. They cut right through and gradually down you slide; insecure,dangerous and much wasted energy and time. Also, mountaineering in a fully rigid boot wastes energy and taxes your feet (and thus whole body) much more. The cookie cutter design collects snow like it was made for it; you'll be whacking them out every other step and maybe stumble because of it.
Rigid crampons are WI specific, really, whereas a steel dual horizontal crampon excels all year. Mountaineering mixed is more stable with two flat points on the rock.

The softer and lighter your boot the faster you will walk and climb and the fewer blisters you will incur. Speed equals safety, happiness and braging rights. Consider your objectives and the ratio of time spent on your toes to time spent doing everything else, like a big approach on trail.

Summer routes in rigid boots and/or rigid crampons really sucks, and you'll only do it once. A full stap on crampon is the most versatile for all boot types,even approach shoes.
Stiles
From the Mountains
Joined May 21, 2003
791 points
Apr 22, 2013
top of mt. lady washington - rmnp
I've used my BD cyborg dual-points for general mountaineering quite a bit and never had a problem.

Although I'm tempted to get a pair of aluminum 'pons that weigh about half as much...(although concerned about the durability as dave commented on)
Andrew Mayer
Joined Nov 14, 2010
113 points
Apr 22, 2013
Middle
This thread reminds me how retarded the internet can be at times. jesus. Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Joined Jul 23, 2010
130 points
Apr 22, 2013
Lucander off the GT Ledge on p. 2 of Keep on Strut...
Use whatever you got and get the job done. My old aluminum 'pons did dozens of ascents on snow hills like Shasta and Hood and they're still intact, while my nice ice climbing crampons have done well on anythng I've done in them too.

Get after it!
lucander
From Stone Ridge, NY
Joined Apr 1, 2009
334 points
Apr 23, 2013
thanks all, good stuff to think about.
especiallly the slipping/shearing of vert points in snow.

the whole pissing thing almost threw me off though..... i thought mountaineers did it lying down in their tents into wide mouth gatorade bottles that they then cuddle up to.
daven
Joined Apr 6, 2013
0 points
Apr 23, 2013
I've used my petzl lynx's on many climbs without a problem. I'd much rather have them then horizontal points especially if the route has any ice or vert rock Kyro
Joined Apr 4, 2013
5 points
Apr 23, 2013
Free Solo up hitchcock gully WI3
Kyro wrote:
I've used my petzl lynx's on many climbs without a problem. I'd much rather have them then horizontal points especially if the route has any ice or vert rock



seconded. Then again I mostly only climb routes that require ice. If youre just looking to go to rainier and slog up the DC you prob should get horizontals.
superkick
From West Hartford, CT
Joined Aug 23, 2011
31 points
Apr 23, 2013
Thunderbolt Peak in the Palisades
I have an older pair of Grivel Rambo crampons that I use for ice climbing that I also use for technical mountaineering. I have the anti-bott plates for them though. I wear a stiff spring boot that works well with them.

For summer conditions where the snow will be harder and I will be in approach shoes I wear steel grivel strap on crampons.

If all you have right now are rambos then use them. Cut up a milk carton container and zip tie the plastic to the bottom of your crampons as a poor mans anti-bott plate.
randy88fj62
Joined May 28, 2010
67 points
Administrator
Apr 23, 2013
Most of the above points are good.

One minor advantage of the Rambos is that their front points have a T-shape. Hence, they won't shear as much.

It's totally a gray scale on this issue. Some mountaineering routes are more technical and you may do better with stiffer boots and crampons...but very difficult ice routes have been done with semi-rigid crampons and somewhat flexing boots.

The more rock (mixed climbing) you anticipate, the worse aluminum crampons will perform.

Remember to tap the sides of your crampons from time to time in balling conditions...even with anti-bots with rigid crampons.

If you watch that old video of that 1996(?) ascent of Chomolungma from IMAX, you'll see Tenzing's son mountaineering up that little chunk to the top in Rambos. They work.
Leo Paik
From Westminster, Colorado
Joined Jan 1, 2001
23,299 points
Apr 23, 2013
I once heard a guide in the alps walking along with his clients..




" Step...... Step...... Step..... Knock yer boots.... Step..... Step.... Step... Knock yer boots"

I am betting Whitney has been climbed with rigid, non rigid, 10 point, ski crampons, and maybe skins. Heck, probably been climbed in Converse High Tops. People do all sorts of things, you'll make it in Rambo's, you might save some weight and have an easier time on snow with horizontals. It's all about what you choose to concentrate on to make the climb the experience you want it to be.

knock yer boots.
robrobrobrob
Joined Oct 23, 2012
10 points


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