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Building an anchor with climbing rope
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By William Domhart
From Ventucky, CA
Feb 21, 2012
Traverse by HWY 41 Cave

I've found lots of references about building an anchor with your climbing rope on here (20 pages of search results on MP), but I haven't seen an explanation and picture (I'm visual).

Anyone have a good picture or link of an anchor built using your climbing rope so I can get the gist of it? I've had two situations come up so far where it would have been nice to know and that's two too many for me. Grassy ass in advance.

Oh...and yerr gonna die!


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By Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Feb 21, 2012
OTL

Will, I think for you it would be "YAARRR GONNA DIE"


Here's a read to get you started
www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1661357/Anchor-with-the-rop>>>

Its something I'd like to practice too - I just never seem to do any lead swapping multi-pitches.


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By William Domhart
From Ventucky, CA
Feb 21, 2012
Traverse by HWY 41 Cave

Ahoy ahoy, I think you're right Matt! How was J-Tree?

Oh, and Yarrrghz gonna die!


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By RNclimber
From Riverside, Ca
Feb 21, 2012
Seconds before onsighting Gun Smoke V3, Joshua Tree bouldering

climbinglife.com/rock-anchoring-systems-videos-advanced/buil>>>


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By Greg-Az
From Prescott Az
Feb 21, 2012

I like the self-equalizing figure eight knot.

The pros; it equalized pieces, bomber simple rigging, built in safty and the ability to extend the anchor much further and easier than using slings and cordelettes.

The cons; if one of your pieces pop it will extend also it can use quite a bit of rope.



Another way... After you place three peices of gear tie off two of them, then run the rope through the third peices biner, pull the two loops formed in between the peices towards the direction of pull and tie tie a master point. Think of it like single strained cordelette.

Its easier to visualize if you just play with it inside your house or something.

Or in joshua-tree where the route are short I pull up fifty feet of slack after finishing the climb and run it around the largest and nearest boulder I can find. Normaly they are about thirty feet long and ten feet wide and I am sure those things arent going any where. Just tie them off with a figue eight and biner to your side of the rope.

Theres are so many ways to do this. Have fun be safe and yer gonna die.


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By BHMBen
From The Deeper South
Feb 21, 2012
Post climb snack... <br /> <br />Photo is of Strappo Hughes, taken in the Yosemite Lodge parking lot in 1982 by Russ Walling.

Some examples.

On tree.
On tree.


In a crack.
In a crack.


Two bolts.
Two bolts.


Stole off the internet.
Stole off the internet.


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By kBobby
From Spokane, WA
Feb 21, 2012

BirminghamBen wrote:
Some examples.

In your first example, if you put the ATC biner on one of the bights instead of the linking biner, you will move the tri-axial loading off of the linking biner and onto the rope. The rope is better suited to take such load configurations.


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By canyonclimber
From Casper WY
Feb 21, 2012

I use the rope for anchors all the time. I see lots of questionable anchors here in this post. Later today I will post a simple (tried and true) rope anchor system for you.


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By Peter Franzen
Administrator
From Phoenix, AZ
Feb 21, 2012
Belay

Picture #2 and picture #4 in BirminghamBen's post look sketchy as hell to me. I can't even tell what's going on in #2, and everything is far too close together in #4 (in addition to not really being equalized).


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By fat cow
From Salinas, CA
Feb 21, 2012
perfect seam

ya those pics are shit, there are better ways to do all of them except # 2 because who knows what the hells going on there. it may be a joke though, hopefully he knows it.


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By Sir Wanksalot
From County Jail
Feb 21, 2012

Buy a book (Craig Lubben). Find some rope. Find some cracks (on the ground). Build anchors. Pull the shit outta them and try to make them fail. See what happens. Scientific Investigation.

Definately don't listen to internet wankers for advice or you proably will die. You can always hire a guide.


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By tk1085
Feb 21, 2012
Flying high at mountain creek <br />

i found this video by Eli Helmuth very helpful. and hopefully what you are looking for
climbinglife.com/rock-anchoring-systems-videos-advanced/buil>>>


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By kBobby
From Spokane, WA
Feb 21, 2012

Peter Franzen wrote:
Picture #2 and picture #4 in BirminghamBen's post look sketchy as hell to me. I can't even tell what's going on in #2, and everything is far too close together in #4 (in addition to not really being equalized).

The only problem with #4 is that the quickdraw is unnecessary. Everything else is in that setup is fine.


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By JSH
Administrator
Feb 21, 2012
JSH @ home <br /> <br />photo courtesy of Gabe Ostriker

#4 above is three pieces in a row. That's not synonymous with an anchor, at least in my mind. Some kind of equalization of load would be a good start.

Here's what I do with doubles.
Basically, clove hitch each rope (green and blue here) separately to two of your pieces (#1 and #2 here). Then run one side back to your harness, and back up to the third piece (#3 here). Done.
Note: this ties you into the anchor. Deal accordingly.

two ropes makin' happy.
two ropes makin' happy.


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By Mike G
Feb 21, 2012

#1 places load on the gate of the biner. extending the knots further from the tree would relieve that


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By JoeP
From Littleton, CO
Feb 21, 2012

JSH wrote:
#4 above is three pieces in a row. That's not synonymous with an anchor, at least in my mind. Some kind of equalization of load would be a good start.


I believe I've seen that exact setup in the Luebben book. The pieces are tensioned with the cloves, so that they are sharing the load to some degree.


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By mattm
From TX
Feb 21, 2012
Grande Grotto

Greg-Az wrote:
I like the self-equalizing figure eight knot. The pros; it equalized pieces, bomber simple rigging, built in safty and the ability to extend the anchor much further and easier than using slings and cordelettes.


Pretty sure it has been proven via testing that the friction in the knot pretty much kills any hopes of equalization.


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By Harry Dorcy
From Denver, CO
Feb 21, 2012

+1. This was the video I was going to refer you to. Great resource.


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By JesseT
From Portland, OR
Feb 21, 2012
25' drop...wheeeeee!

JSH wrote:
#4 above is three pieces in a row. That's not synonymous with an anchor, at least in my mind. Some kind of equalization of load would be a good start...


Nothing wrong with rigging stuff in series. No anchors really equalize anyway.


I'm surprised nobody's posted this one yet:




Classic!


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By Yarp
Feb 21, 2012

Classic photo but the interwebz told me there is a bolt just out of frame. Anyone know if that is the verified truth?


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By William Domhart
From Ventucky, CA
Feb 21, 2012
Traverse by HWY 41 Cave

The method in that video looks like a good start for some garage tinker time later tonight. Not sure what I think of the setups in the pics, except that awesome rig in picture 2, ;)


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By JesseT
From Portland, OR
Feb 21, 2012
25' drop...wheeeeee!

Yarp wrote:
Classic photo but the interwebz told me there is a bolt just out of frame. Anyone know if that is the verified truth?


I heard that too, unverified though...

(edit: it has been verified that there is currently a bolt there, but unverified that it was there at the time this photo was taken)


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By BHMBen
From The Deeper South
Feb 21, 2012
Post climb snack... <br /> <br />Photo is of Strappo Hughes, taken in the Yosemite Lodge parking lot in 1982 by Russ Walling.

Anchor nerds....Shouldn't most of y'all be drawing diagrams and crunching numbers?

Triaxle loading?...under weight it all straightened out..
Not equalized?...yeah, yeah....
A knot it a crack????...yessir.

Any of those anchors, well maybe not the knot, will hold more forces than any of you will generate.

Oh....and that knot....Not for the faint of heart and I'm not suggesting anyone go out and try this...or that anchor for that matter...but it was solid.

Dude asked for some pics....there they are.

As for that draw in #4....sure makes a dandy spot for a redirect.


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By William Domhart
From Ventucky, CA
Feb 21, 2012
Traverse by HWY 41 Cave

Leeroy Jenkins wrote:
more tools in the tool box are never a bad thing. +1


That's pretty much what I was looking for. Learn some new tools to practice and put in the quiver. Thanks for the suggestions, I'll look at the ones that make sense and run through them in the garage to see if they makes sense. Might have some more questions later after I test and ponder a bit.


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By rgold
From Poughkeepsie, NY
Feb 21, 2012
The traverse out to the Yellow Ridge on the Dogstick Ridge link-up.  Photo by Myriam Bouchard

I do what Julie does with doubles, unless the configuration of pieces is more or less in a vertical line, in which case I use a sequence of clove hitches.

For single ropes, I've posted this picture in various places. It is similar to but, in my opinion, better the Eli Helmuth's version in his video.



Some people look at it and proclaim a clusterfk, but in fact it is generally faster and, of course, far more versatile than a cordelette.


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By JesseT
From Portland, OR
Feb 21, 2012
25' drop...wheeeeee!

In reference to:



Leeroy Jenkins wrote:
...This one is anything but simple. I've never built anything like it in the field and I'm pretty sure I never will but I figure it's better to know how and never use it than to end up shitting my pants 400 ft up a wall because I dropped my (alpine) cock ring and can't figure out how to distribute the load between a bunch of manky gear...


For real? There's so much friction at the PP that you're not going to get good load distribution (equalization) when it counts (in a fall). Not enough to justify that stellar cluster anyway. If your gear's really that bad, either A) You picked the wrong belay B) Use some slings to equalize (sliding x or whatever), if you don't have enough slings and are at the best belay available then C) come on, you shoulda seen this sitch coming.


Leeroy Jenkins wrote:
...The thing to focus on is learning the "why" of anchor building and not the "how"....


I am left asking myself both those questions.

In any case, this one is more of an "advanced manoeuvre."

K.I.S.S.


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