Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Bicep tendinitis
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
By thomas.w
From Denver, CO
Mar 27, 2012
Hey climbing community,

I have in the past few months developed something I can only assume is tendinitis in my bicep. I have been trying to ice it after climbing outside and at the gym. It to some extent helps a little, but week by week it only seems to get worse. Have any of you been through this and have any recommendations on exercises or or stretches, or should I simply just go get physical therapy?

Any information or suggestions is better than what I've got right now and would be appreciated.

FLAG
By dirtbag
From Bellingham, WA
Mar 27, 2012
i really enjoyed this drive to the tetons... can't wait to make it back to WY
i remember the book "one move too many" (my bible for stuff like this) says a lot about bicep tendonitis but I haven't read into it and won't have the book on hand for another week since i'm traveling. if you're still interested by then shoot me a msg.

FLAG
By James Otey
From NH
Mar 27, 2012
Urban Surfer, Rumney. <br /> <br />Photo by Lee Hansche
More pushups, less climbing

FLAG
By erik kapec
From prescott, az
Mar 27, 2012
enjoying the static, grappel and a smoke on Dana...
I had something similar although closure to my elbow. Drinking tons of water, and backing off of the harder routes and boulder problems definitely made the biggest difference. Also a good stretch and warm up. Ooh and some of that good old vitamin I.

FLAG
By Aerili
From Salt Lake City, UT
Mar 27, 2012
The West Desert...it's not just for climbing, suckers! <br /> <br />Photo by Samantha
Is is proximal (near the shoulder) or distal (by the elbow)?

If you can get PT, you should, even if only a few sessions.

Why do you keep climbing when it continues to get worse by doing so? If you really have bicipital tendonitis, rest would be first and foremost.

FLAG
By Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Mar 27, 2012
Mathematical!
James Otey wrote:
More pushups, less climbing

+1

Also, dips are good. I've also had luck with this exercise:

  • Edit* I can't get the video to work for the life of me. Too tired to think about it right now, maybe I'll try again after some sleep.

FLAG
By thomas.w
From Denver, CO
Mar 27, 2012
Thanks for the responses guys, the inflammation has actually gotten worse since Sunday and has been flared up for three straight days now. Making the call and going to get PT. Appreciate the info though. Thanks guys.

FLAG
By Eric8
From Framingham
Mar 27, 2012
mountainproject.com/v/tendonit...

FLAG
 
By boulderbum
From NY
Mar 28, 2012
Had it so bad the pain would make me nauseous. Find a chiro that does active release therapy/ART, really helped with getting mine from chronic to very manageable. Like other guys mentioned too, pushups and dips, and a dedication to them, help a ton.

FLAG
By Eric Carlos
From Boulder, CO
Mar 29, 2012
Always wear a helmet.  I had it with me but chose not to wear it.  A fist sized rock fell about 35-40 ft and hit me right on top of the head
I would avoid the vitamin I except for the day of an injury. There is substantial research showing that longer term use slows recovery of tendons and can actually lead to weaker tendons elsewhere. NSAIDS mask the pain but have no healing benefit. If you want to feel better and push through, by all means, take it. If you want to recover and heal, stay away from it.

FLAG
By Aerili
From Salt Lake City, UT
Mar 29, 2012
The West Desert...it's not just for climbing, suckers! <br /> <br />Photo by Samantha
Eric Carlos wrote:
I would avoid the vitamin I except for the day of an injury. There is substantial research showing that longer term use slows recovery of tendons and can actually lead to weaker tendons elsewhere.

1. Please cite the research that shows NSAIDs weaken tendons in general.

2. Impairing healing in soft tissue is not that black and white or clear cut. There are conflicting studies about not only how long you have to take an NSAID for this to occur, but there is uncertainty about which NSAIDs actually do this (in some cases, ibuprofen has shown no detriment to the healing process vs other NSAIDs), and whether you are studying bone, ligments, or tendons-- and which part, like osteotendinous junction or some other area of the tendon. Not to mention that many of these studies are not carried out on humans and some are even done only on soft tissues from animals in petri dishes. (It would be erroneous to think tendons or ligaments always behave identically in petri dishes as in the body...we are finding they certainly do not.)

I believe short term use of NSAIDs is generally felt to be safe and helpful in many cases of acute or chronic injury (probably 2-4 weeks). Certainly I have had past injuries where I simply could not start exercise therapy in the rehab process UNTIL I finally started a short term NSAID therapy (due to chronic re-aggravation of the injury without them). So it can be useful.

FLAG
By lucander
From Stone Ridge, NY
Mar 29, 2012
Lucander off the GT Ledge on p. 2 of Keep on Struttin.
mountainproject.com/v/my-bicep...

FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.